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  #11  
Old 01-10-2012
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We've used cedar battens on the ceilings (hull lining) of two boats with good effect.. but this is another no-strength-required application. It can look surprisingly close to teak with the right finish. And even if left light it can provide a pleasing contrast.

As a softwood it may 'shrink and swell' more than hardwoods with humidity changes...
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  #12  
Old 01-10-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
True cedar is of the species Cedrus, only 4 varieties I know of, now if I can remember all four, Liabanii, ie Cedars of Lebonon reference in the bible, deodora, Atlantica and brevifolia.....had to look the last one up! Members of the Pineaceae(pine) family

Some like the W Red cedar, Thuja plicata, or members of the juniper Cupressaceae family, Alaska Yellow cedar is Chamacyparis nootkatensis, I'm seeing it with a species of Callitropsis on wikopedia, altho I usually see it at nurseries I by material from as I said it initially. Incense cedar/ Calocedrus decurens is the one I see the most.....there are a few other species of incense cedar........

W Red cedar is used, as is Eastern red cedar on boats, as is other types of the Juniper version of cedar. Not sure if the TRUE cedars ie Cedrus sp are used in boats or not.....

Marty
Alaska yellow cedar is the one I referred to as sickening me. It has a very fibrous, grainless texture. It is very soft but in a different way than western red - it has an almost spongy quality to it. It is apparently very good for planking hulls - very rot resistant. Hard to get here though - it all gets shipped to Japan apparently.
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  #13  
Old 01-11-2012
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I think that Port Orford cedar is (white?)lighter in colour and more spicey pungent than our BC yellow cedar .Red cedar grows on the lower altitudes while yellow stays quite high. the trees are nearly the same visually .Old growth yellow cedar has got to be just about the nicest wood to work with. Especially the odour! Only three characteristics keep in from perfect.Lemnoria (pinworms) think it's candy and it"s oiliness sheds enamel .Old fashioned aluminum paint is a decent undercoat topsides but bottom paint takes on a new importance. It's hard ,strong and stable but shows a pretty grain like Norwegian goat cheese.Really resists rot. Red cedar can show a pretty grain (slash cut) for interior panel and trim but unless saturation epoxied before the varnish will take on an attractive distressed look .Many of the older fish boats were planked above the boot top in cedar;fir below. Not much forest left here today so you can buy purple heart from the tropics at similar prices as local woods. Who da thunkit!
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Old 01-11-2012
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Geez, you guys sure know a lot about cedar !
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Old 01-11-2012
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Actually Len,

WRC is close to the look of AYC, but if you know what to look for, there is quite a difference. Take a bow of both, crunch them in your hand, WRC is uch nicer to smell, If you look on the back side of the needles, WRC has a bow tie green and white needles, and AYC does not have that look. I've also notice, AYC is a bit scrawnier due to growing in the higher elevations. Hence probably why the AYC is used for hull boards vs WRC, as gowing at a higher elevation and a bit farther north, the growing year is smaller, making it a bit denser and heavier than WRC per equal board ft etc. Altho where they intermingle, around me in Seattle, 1700-2200' or there abouts, they can look more the same than different, but take a low growth AYC compare to a WRC at sealevel, very distinct looking trees.

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Old 01-11-2012
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I have been wood turning for many years:

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Long story short, after developing a bad cough that took over a year to get rid of, my doctor advised me that Western Red Cedar is VERY toxic and can do ir-reversible lung damage. End of working with it for me. Suggest you use the best respirator you can find and use it ALL the time.

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Old 01-11-2012
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Historically, on the US east coast, the 'ceilings', which in wooden boat lingo is the planking on the interior of the hull framing, would be done in what was called Atlantic White Cedar (or a variant of that which was called juniper cedar in the south). I can't tell you what the Latin name is but it was a reasonably dense, rot resistant, and light weight wood. I have seen Western Red Cedar used as well. Western red cedar looks nicer if you are bright finishing, but its a little softer and does not seem to hold a finish as nicely as white cedar. I would not use cedar as a walking surface, and no matter where you use cedar you need to allow air movement to keep it dry, and allow for expansion since it swells more than most woods.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
Historically, on the US east coast, the 'ceilings', which in wooden boat lingo is the planking on the interior of the hull framing, would be done in what was called Atlantic White Cedar (or a variant of that which was called juniper cedar in the south). I can't tell you what the Latin name is but it was a reasonably dense, rot resistant, and light weight wood. I have seen Western Red Cedar used as well. Western red cedar looks nicer if you are bright finishing, but its a little softer and does not seem to hold a finish as nicely as white cedar. I would not use cedar as a walking surface, and no matter where you use cedar you need to allow air movement to keep it dry, and allow for expansion since it swells more than most woods.
Good point, all of the Cedars I have used are fairly soft, much like Sugar Pine.
really nice and easy to work with but scratches and dents easily, not very durable or wear resistant, does smell good though!!

Dabnis
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Old 01-11-2012
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Eliminating the smell issue, Cedar would be very soft with a mid 300 density. For ceilings and side battens, may be fine but for cabinetry, may not hold up without getting dents and dings in the wood, screws stripping out, etc... If you like the look of cedar or the rot resistance, what about Cypress or Iroko. Also, rot resistance wood in today's market is overated. Cedar and Cypress and some others are harvest through farms where the trees are design to grow much faster then "old growth" woods. Most trees have some type of rot resistance even Oak.
They use to find cypress river logs that were over 500 years old, still in perfect condition and some old growth cypress trees grow to 1000 yrs old, obviously in swamps and isolated areas. Sorry, went off on a tangent about woods. Anyways, just my two cents.
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Old 01-11-2012
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Many of the early American small craft were planked with different sub species of White Pine or White Cedar but the interesting aspect of this is that these old growth trees have almost no parallel to what you can get your hands on now. When the boat builders of those days chose vertical grain softwoods to build a boat, the qualities such as strength and durability were, I believe, very different from what can be expected from these same species today if you can even get them. I found some very old vertical grain Red Cedar to build my Guideboat which made a very pretty boat but my first choice was White Cedar. There seems to be nothing of reasonable quality to be had in long lengths.
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