Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People. - Page 37 - SailNet Community

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  #361  
Old 06-09-2012
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RhythmDoctor View Post
I really enjoyed those videos a lot. As someone with zero offshore experience, it gave a real feel for what it's like. It seems that he didn't do everything perfectly, but had very sound judgement when it came time to recover from his mistakes. He had a heart of gold for helping out that penniless fool on the other boat. Littauer's poor passenger/crew Gail proves why you never want to head offshore with someone you don't know. (My wife won't even do a daysail with someone we don't know. And Internet pals fall into the "don't know" category.)

If I find myself in trouble someday, I hope there's someone like Drake nearby to render assistance. He just seems like a nice guy, and not at all self-absorbed like that publicity whore Dom "Mee Mee Mee."
Good post. Agree. Tell your wife the best way to get to know your internet friends is to babysit. I got two coming your way right now... (snicker).

In all seriousnes though, who is this Dom you referred to?

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  #362  
Old 06-09-2012
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

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Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
...In all seriousnes though, who is this Dom you referred to?
He's another guy who made a video of himself on a singlehanded ocean passage. Discussed in this thread.
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  #363  
Old 06-18-2012
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

I think the problem in many of these cases is that would-be sailors get steeped in the mythology of single-handed ocean passages before they get any real experience. I'm not saying that's necessarily the case here, but it well could be.

So, instead of going from A to B, they want to go from A to Z in one go. The logical progression is some coastal, then progressive longer and more complex offshore passages -- with crew (preferably experienced). Instead, they want to go straight for the single-handed circumnavigation or some such.

It's definitely not smart and potentially dangerous. After all, how many climbers start by trying to summit Mt.Everest without supplemental oxygen?

Last edited by sneuman; 06-18-2012 at 12:18 PM.
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  #364  
Old 06-18-2012
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

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Originally Posted by sneuman View Post
I think the problem in many of these cases is that would-be sailors get steeped in the mythology of single-handed ocean passages before they get any real experience. I'm not saying that's necessarily the case here, but it well could be.

So, instead of going from A to B, they want to go from A to Z in one go. The logical progression is some coastal, then progressive longer and more complex offshore passages -- with crew (preferably experienced). Instead, they want to go straight for the single-handed circumnavigation or some such.

It's definitely not smart and potentially dangerous. After all, how many climbers start by trying to summit Mt.Everest without supplemental oxygen?
I would have to agree with Sneuman, education,common sense and practice. Although living in Naples, FL I am very familiar with the lone lawyer story but I would think that the extremely rare exception and not at all the rule.
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  #365  
Old 08-24-2014
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

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Originally Posted by jameswilson29 View Post
Two more interesting aspects to Drake's ordeal are his concerns about the deck-stepped mast and the problems associated with his roller-furling jib during the storm.

Although the compression post survived its flexing during the storm, it appears he would have had greater peace of mind with a keel-stepped mast.

Again, we read about problems retracting a roller furling jib in heavy air, and all the associated problems it has caused. I seem to recall Cha Cha's skipper experienced the same difficulty, leading to its roller-furling jib being ripped to shreds. I am still not convinced roller furling is the way to go offshore.

Both skippers would have likely been able to reduce sail area at the critical time more effectively and quickly by dropping a hanked-on jib to the deck and securing it, instead of having to contend with an uncooperative roller furling system.
Bearing away and reducing the apparent wind work fine for roller furling, even in high winds.
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  #366  
Old 08-24-2014
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

Originally Posted by jameswilson29

"Both skippers would have likely been able to reduce sail area at the critical time more effectively and quickly by dropping a hanked-on jib to the deck and securing it, instead of having to contend with an uncooperative roller furling system."

For my 2 cents worth, if one is having that much trouble furling a jib, I'm not too sure I want to be on the foredeck wrestling a hanked sail down and either tie it to the lifelines or unhank it and get it below. Much better to learn to work the furler in heavy weather, IMO.
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  #367  
Old 08-24-2014
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

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Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
The skipper of Cha Cha is a parasite. I can't imagine how he sleeps at night.
I realize this is an old thread, but I'm just reading about it after viewing a few of the Paragon video's. I agree completely. In 20/20 hindsight, I would have taken the crew off and left the ******* out there on his own.
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  #368  
Old 08-24-2014
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

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Originally Posted by SlowButSteady View Post
Also...Old or new, a rolled up jib/genoa still produces a lot of windage aloft exactly when one doesn't want a lot of windage aloft.
Windage is not the issue.

Ensuring the genoa doesn't come unraveled and tearing is a bigger concern. If it is rolled up well, then taking a spinnaker halyard and wrapping it around in the other direction will help protect it from coming undone.
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  #369  
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

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Originally Posted by blowinstink View Post
The Pardeys make a pretty strong case for never lying a hull and never running off. I believe that lying a hull has been broadly dismissed as a storm tactic (passive, puts the boat broadside to the seas exposed and vulnerable to being rolled). As for running off, we have all read accounts of boats sucessfully runnning off but the Pardeys argue compellingly (IMO) that it is the *failures* that should be examined and that boats which run off (and certainly those which lay a hull) are the ones which are damaged and do not survive storm conditions. As for when to heave to, they state as soon as you think of it, but also focus on the steepness of the waves rather than the wind speed (when the white horses become overhanging crests). They make a good case. I'll have to look at Roth again to compare (it has been a few years).
The issue with running off is you lose ground, but it is not a bad tactic. When waves are breaking on top of you, and your steering gets mushy, then you might find yourself rounding up and beam on to the seas. I'd like to try a really big para-anchor (24') in these conditions. The effects of a Von Karman (VK) vortex are really significant--take a look as some satelite images of clouds around an island for proof--600 miles of disturbed air; and in water a VK vortex will diminish waves for miles. I've hove to in gale conditions and found the results quite pleasing--instant anti nausea medication--miserable to comfy in 15 seconds.
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  #370  
Old 08-24-2014
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Re: Reality at Sea - For Cruisers, Singlehanders, and Normal People.

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Originally Posted by AdamLein View Post
Good points. On the other hand, wouldn't a traditional hull form with a longer keel be more stable lying to a sea anchor?
Longer keels tend to fore-reach when hove to, sailing out of their protected slick of disturbed water, so a para-anchor is nice to have in that situation.
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