Running Aground West coast vs East coast - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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My worst.

I hit a rock on the east side of Boat Passage (Winter Cove). I had not noticed the the current was pushing us as much as it was. The depth sounder read 4.9 feet. We hit, bounced up and then came down on the rock. We were lucky. There was some hull delamination. That was a valuable lesson. When Sailing Directions indicates that local knowledge is required, believe it.

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post #22 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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Can we get the captain of the Italian Cruise Ship to post about exactly how he got that large rock embedded in his hull?

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post #23 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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Next time you are in Desolation take the dingy out to Sky Pilot Rock at low tide. Count the many different colours of bottom paint criscrossing it. If it were not for the100 meters deep all around it I would dive for the scrap metal that has accumulated since the missionary boat named it. It's a real money maker (I worked at Lund Marine). I could go on and on about shoring up with beach poles, vessels caught 8ft out of water on two points of terror firmer. How unsettle ling is that ?
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post #24 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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how he got that large rock embedded in his hull?
News reports cited an unspecified electrical fault.
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post #25 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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If submerged logs count, then count me in the grounding camp. In Howe sound with 200 metres under my hulls. A little chop, some sun in my eyes, and a a bit of inattention. Two the the hulls, it is a trimaran, were firmly "beached" on a log. After dropping the sails, I was able to reverse off the log under power. No damage to the boat or even the bottom coat.
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post #26 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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I've been sailing for 40+ years, and run aground a few times.. But I've run aground more in one afternoon sailing a catboat in Mystic than all the rest put together!.. Seriously, you guys need to get some more water over there!
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post #27 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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Sailing here in the Chesapeake, we ran aground several times with our first boat, a Seafarer 30, drawing 4'11" (makes 5 feet look sick!), which is really easy to do with shoaling so common, and no chartplotter on that boat. Two groundings, Selby Bay and Shaw bay area, were due to our inexperience at "reading the water" and how shoaling typically extends from the points of land in narrow creeks; two, around Knapps Narrows, were just due to the fact that the Narrows is not charted accurately, and we needed local knowledge... which we now have! We have unlimited towing from Towboat US, which I highly recommend for the Chesapeake. They are great and it is well worth it. Our soft muddy bottom means no damage, usually, except to your pride.
With our current boat, a Caliber 35 LRC, draft 4'6" and a great chartplotter, (and more experience!) we kissed the bottom once around Knapps Narrows, but immediately got off, no big deal.
We love exploring and gunkholing, which is going to involve some chance for grounding, sooner or later. Even in the Chesapeake, with a small tidal variation, it is best to time being in a shallow passage or entrance to a creek for around high tide... that 6 inches or so can make all the difference!
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post #28 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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Our second day on Ubiquitous, motoring up Intracoastal, north of Beaufort, SC, we found a channel entrance, indicated on the chart to be indeed part of the ICW and supposedly 12' at low tide. You know that feeling when the diesel is humming along nicely and you look over to the shore, and...the land is not moving, you glance down at the GPS, and see 0/nmh and CRAP! Apparently dredged channels have a habit of drifting. So, while we waited for the tide to lift us, we plotted a new course that took us out to the mouth of the ocean and back in to a different leg to reconnect to the ICW. Took about 45 mins to regain buoyancy and hit the new course. Kind of nice to get that out of the way on only our second day as new sailors!

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post #29 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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I bought my boat in the Chesapeake and brought it home to NJ through the C&D canal, then through the Cape May canal. I ran aground leaving Rock Hall on a shoal in the bay. I ran aground entering the Cohansey River, apparently you have to hug the channel marker. I ran HARD aground right behind the Cape May-Lewes ferry! Apparently the 12 foot charted depth doesn't account for the ferry props washing the bottom up into 3 feet of depth. I ran hard aground four or five times right along side the dredge in the Barnegat inlet channel. The dredge might be sitting in deep water, but how do you get around it? The saving grace in all of this is that my boat has a retractable keel, and I try to always sail with it all the way down.

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post #30 of 39 Old 01-14-2012
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Broad Creek off Pamlico River near Washington, NC. I have a "deep water slip". That means that with 4'10+" draft, I have roughly 8-12 inches under the keel in the fairway and first part of the creek. Fortunately, there is only wind tide to contend with, and bottom is typically sand or mud. Keel washes a hole in the slip, so usually when wind blows adversely, boat just settles down and floats in the hole. If the wind blows 20+ for a couple of days, water in the creek blows out and all boats just settle down in their slips (most often upright) and are steadied by their lines. Once I get into the river, there's deep water....that would be 9-10 ft. typically except for the shallow areas. There are a few holes pushing a good bit deeper. Soft grounding is not unusual at all, but usually of no consequence. Most boats that do touch usually manage to get themselves off. In 40 years, I've never had to be towed off when I touched bottom, but in my old age, I have started keeping a current SeaTow membership. After a while, you learn where you can go and where you can't. The amount/height of barnacles showing on the piling and wind predictions generally tell me whether or not I can go sailing on a particular day.
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