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-   -   atomic 4 and man over board (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/83787-atomic-4-man-over-board.html)

you and me 02-11-2012 06:49 PM

atomic 4 and man over board
 
Would you turn on your engine right away or wait 5 minutes?

Sailormon6 02-11-2012 07:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by you and me (Post 830163)
Would you turn on your engine right away or wait 5 minutes?

Yes! ;)

msmith10 02-11-2012 07:04 PM

Do you like the person or not?

123456Wannasail654321 02-11-2012 07:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by you and me (Post 830163)
Would you turn on your engine right away or wait 5 minutes?

I an guessing that he is wondering if you'd forgo the customary five minute blowing out of the bilges prior to starting a gas engine.

I'd say turn on the engine. because the bilge blowing is only if you smell gas fumes. they are not always there.

Lake Superior Sailor 02-11-2012 07:12 PM

After 5 min. where I sail; Their pushing on death's door! I know as I pulled one out of the drink last summer and it's lucky he's alive!....Dale

msmith10 02-11-2012 07:21 PM

I was trying to figure out how the Atomic 4 was relevant. That makes sense. There are several techniques for recovering a man overboard. Starting the engine would not be my first step. Thowing a lifering would be first, followed by an immediate tack allowing the jib to backwind and circling aound to a recovery position. If I wanted to start the engine at some point (be sure you're in neutral so you don't injure the person or snag a line which is easy to lose overboard in the haste of the situation) I would not wait for the blower to clear fumes.
Situations are different. In light winds it may be advantageous to jibe around. I've been in MO situations where we reacted so quickly all we had to do was head into irons and drift back onto the victim.
In general, though, I think teaching 1 method and sticking to it so everybody is on the same page is the best course, and the first method I described is the one I go with.
Get a good basic book and study it, then practice it in warm, nice weather.

travlineasy 02-11-2012 08:03 PM

I am on my second A4 powered boat, never had an inkling of a fuel leak in 7 years of usage in some of the nastiest conditions. As stated above, however, the first thing I would do is toss the life-ring, then come about. I wouldn't hesitate to fire up the engine. Five minutes can literally be a lifetime for someone that falls overboard.

Gary :cool:

you and me 02-11-2012 08:55 PM

Thanks, I really think sticking to a plan is the best. I really like that idea. We attended a heavy weather seminar and we were told to buy a new boat. It was amusing but not goin to happen. We really need to practice this year. Becky :)

newpbs 02-11-2012 09:38 PM

Act Now
 
We had a MOB a few years ago. Fired up the atomic four as soon as we threw a floatation device and eased off the sheets. We were in moderately heavy seas with winds somewhere around 18 knots. We picked up our MOB within a few minutes and we continued on our way.

Our engine room received ventilation while were are moving, so no worries about fumes building up in the bilge.

Hope you can keep your crew on board.

Paul

JSailer 02-11-2012 10:17 PM

Start it.
Let's be realistic... It takes quite a large concentration of fuel vapor to cause an ignition.
I have an Atomic 4 and I have never had any fuel fumes issue.
Unless your engine and fuel lines are in terrible condition, which you would be obviously fully aware of, the odds of anything catastrophic happening to your fuel lines or carburator between the time you shut the engine down and the time your crew fell overboard are simply minuscule in my humble opinion.

I agree with the previous answers that practicing and perfecting MOB recovery under sail is a must, but if you really have to start the A4, I would not hesitate.


Just my opinion as a A4 owner.


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