Fishing off ur sailboat in the northeast - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree4Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 03-02-2012
chef2sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 6,828
Thanks: 28
Thanked 53 Times in 49 Posts
Rep Power: 7
chef2sail will become famous soon enough
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Good story Gary

Quote:
Most of the striped bass will be large, roe-laden cows, some approaching 60 or more pounds.
There are a few at this size...but not many. State records are usually in the 70 lb range. Maryland is about 67 in Chessie

I once had the NJ state recordn years ago for a stripeper weighing iin at 58 lbs 4 oz caught on a full moon on a slack tide on the Bridge between Ocean City NJ and Longport.
It was like landing a whale and it fought me 2 hours. I couldnt really beleive its size when I "hoisted" with help it up on the bridge. Before that the largest stripper I had ever caught was 20 lbs. Would have taken up my whole cockpit of our C&C 35

See striiper records on this site

Striped Bass State Records & World Record - Striped Bass Fishing, Stripers, Rockfish - StriperSurf.com - Saltwater Inshore and Surf Striped Bass Fishing
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 03-02-2012
jimrafford's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ct
Posts: 546
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 4
jimrafford is on a distinguished road
A friend of mine has the new world record for striper. He caught it last August. It was a little over 80lbs.
Jim
__________________
S/V Deja Vu
CS 40
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 03-02-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 196
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 5
delite is on a distinguished road
You should have seen the one that got away! LOL
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 03-02-2012
travlineasy's Avatar
Morgan 33 O.I. Perryville
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,240
Thanks: 3
Thanked 52 Times in 43 Posts
Rep Power: 4
travlineasy will become famous soon enough
For those of you that do not enjoy the taste of fresh bluefish fillets, the absolutely best tasting fish in the mid-Atlantic and New England regions is tautog, also known as blackfish, molly george, poor-man's lobster and other monickers. Tautog primarily feed upon blue mussels, which is their favorite food. They're primarily found lurking in the bowels of wrecks, around rock piles, jetties and artificial reefs. They have been known to attain weights to more than 20 pounds, with the world record 24-pounder caught from a wreck off Virginia's Barrier Islands.

The meat is firm, snow white, flaky and quite sweet. There is very little oil in the flesh, therefore it's really the type of fish that could be readily smoked and retain that smoky flavor. However, they are fantastic when broiled and brushed with butter and seasoned lightly, but my personal favorite is to dip them in a mix of milk and well beaten eggs, then dredge them in homemade cracker crumbs seasoned with a bit of sea-salt, fresh ground pepper, Old Bay Seafood Seasoning and just a dash of garlic powder. I pan fry the coated fillets until golden brown and serve piping hot with some homemade Tarter Sauce.

Local places to find tog include the Inner and Outer Walls of Delaware Bay, Ocean City, MD's South Jetty, all of New Jersey, New York's and New England's inlets protected with jetties, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel's Third and Fourth islands, the sunken liberty ships at Kiptopeke Ferry, Virginia and every coastal wreck from Maine to northern Virginia situated in depths of 80 feet or less.

Flounder have the tendency to be a bit bland, but some folks love fish that don't taste like fish, which is OK too. Flounder, also known as fluke by the folks north of Maryland, are primarily found in shallow bays and estuaries. They primarily feed upon smaller baitfish, mainly bay anchovy, but they will also feed on tubeworms, bloodworms, sandworms, pea crabs, green crabs and anything else that gets within range and is small enough to consume.

The best fishing technique varies from region to region, however, most folks claim drift-fishing with strips of squid, or a minnow/squid sandwich is the most productive. They are most active when the tide is surging and washing unwary baitfish along with the tidal currents. The flounder actually bury themselves in the sandy bottom, leaving only their eyes exposed. When a baitfish gets within range, they thrust their tail against the bottom and engulf the unwary prey in just the blink of an eye. I've witnessed this first hand while diving in the back bays of Virginia's barrier islands. It's an incredible sight.

Flounder have four fillets, two on their back and two on the belly side. They are easily filleted and skinned with the aid of a sharp fillet knife and very little meat is wasted. Once filleted, the meat should be rinsed thoroughly in ice cold, freshwater or clean seawater, then patted dry with paper towels. Nealy everyone either broils them with a thin coating of seasoned butter, or dips them in beer batter and pan fried them. Either way is find, but be sure to serve them piping hot.

Offshore, those fresh, bluefin tuna fillets are tough to beat, especially when charbroiled. If you don't have a charcoal grill onboard, a gas grill will do just fine. Bluefin tuna meat is a bit dark, but has an incredible flavor. I frequently coat the fillets with Yoshida Gourmet Sauce, then while they're grilling I sprinkle on some Montreal Steak Seasoning and baste them with Yoshida. Be careful not to overcook them and they tend to taste best when they are removed from the grill a bit on the rare side.

Catching a bluefin tuna is not for the faint of heart, and I would not recommend doing this with a handline. Bluefin tuna can attain weights approaching 1,000-pounds or more, they're incredibly powerful swimmers, and even a 150-pounder hooked on an 80-pound rated, standup, tuna outfit will take the average person nearly an hour to land--and that's if you know what you're doing. The largest bluefin I've managed to land tipped the scales at 175-pounds and caught at the Jack-Spot 25-miles southeast of Ocean City, Maryland. The fish was hooked at 10:30 a.m. and it took till a few minutes after high noon to bring it to the side of the boat. At the end of an hour, I handed the rod to a young friend, who gave the rod back to me after just 15 minutes. My arms felt like rubber bands and thankfully, there was another, strong you man on the boat to wield the gaff.

Yellowfin tuna, which can be found along all the Atlantic's canyon edges and in the Gulf of Mexico, can attain weights of 600 or more pounds, they're a fast-growing, tropical species and readily slam fast moving lures trolled near the surface. They're fond of eating dolphin-fish (Mahi-Mahi), and the most productive skip bait I've found has been a bright, multi-colored, skirted lure with a green, blue and yellow pattern. Trolling speeds of 5 to 7 knots are the norm, so don't worry about going too fast to catch them--not many sailboats will exceed their speed under normal conditions.

Yellowfin tuna are a great tasting fish, with charbroiling being the preferred method of cooking. With this particular species I prefer using an Italian dressing marinate for about 30 minutes prior to cooking--it adds lots of flavor. I also baste the fillets with the same marinate through much of the cooking process.

Both bluefin and yellowfin tuna have a strip of dark meal along the lateral line, which in my opinion is nasty tasting at best. Removing that strip of dark, oily meat makes a world of difference in the overall taste of both species.

Someone mentioned they didn't enjoy the taste of mackerel. I guess it depends upon which species of mackerel you're talking about. Atlantic mackerel, which are the first to arrive during the spring off the mid-Atlantic region, are relatively small, rarely exceeding two pounds, very oily, and easy to catch. Granted, they're a bit too oily when prepared using traditional cooking methods, but skinned, filleted and smoked using the recipe I posted above, they're pretty darned good. They make a great afternoon snack while you're cruising along and sipping an ice-cold beer.

King mackerel, also known as kingfish, are frequently served in the best restaurants. They too are a bit oily, but when skinned, filleted, the dark meat removed and broiled they're fantastic tasting. A word of caution, though. King mackerel, bluefish, swordfish and many other oily species contain high levels of PCBs and mercury. There are specific health warnings associated with them and consumption levels are quite small. Be sure to check the local and federal web sites on finfish consumption restrictions--just to be on the safe side. For me, at 71-years of age, it probably doesn't make a lot of difference--the damage has already been done.

Cero mackerel are pretty good when smoked and I've used hickory, apple, maple and a few other hardwoods for them with a fair degree of success.

Spanish mackerel, which can be found along the coast from south Jersey to the Florida Keys and Gulf Of Mexico, is among the best tasting mackerel I've encountered. Fresh fillets placed on a grill and basted with melted, garlic butter taste absolutely incredible.

Spanish mackerel are primarily an inshore species, found at the mouths of bays and in the lower reaches of estuaries in small to mid-size schools. In Chesapeake Bay, during a hot, dry summer, they can be found anywhere south of the Bay Bridges at Sandy Point, mainly in the bay's open waters near the mouths of larger rivers. Top locations include Smith Point Bar at the mouth of the Potomac River, Windmill and Stingray points at the mouth of the Rappahannock River and the 4th Island of the CBBT. They'll slam small spoons, lures measuring 1.5 to 3 inches, trolled at speeds of 5 to 8 knots. Anything moving slower will be completely ignored.

Cheers,

Gary
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 03-02-2012
travlineasy's Avatar
Morgan 33 O.I. Perryville
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,240
Thanks: 3
Thanked 52 Times in 43 Posts
Rep Power: 4
travlineasy will become famous soon enough
You are absolutely right, Dave--not many stripers in the 60-pound plus size category. The largest one I've seen is mounted and displayed above the conference room door on the first floor of the Maryland DNR office building in Annapolis, Maryland. I believe it was 83-pounds, but was caught in a gill net, therefore not included in the IGFA records.

Cheers,

Gary
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 03-02-2012
deniseO30's Avatar
Move over Joan Rivers!
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bristol pa
Posts: 5,873
Thanks: 51
Thanked 72 Times in 64 Posts
Rep Power: 9
deniseO30 will become famous soon enough deniseO30 will become famous soon enough
Blue fish? EW
__________________
Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club. New Website!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

my current "project"!
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 03-02-2012
chef2sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 6,828
Thanks: 28
Thanked 53 Times in 49 Posts
Rep Power: 7
chef2sail will become famous soon enough
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Bluefin tuna are a delicacy and fetch in excess of $50 lb from A+ grade sushi suplliers. They are becomming extremely over fished.

Dave
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 03-02-2012
Maine Sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Maine Coast
Posts: 5,276
Thanks: 9
Thanked 114 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 15
Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice Maine Sail is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
Catching a bluefin tuna is not for the faint of heart, and I would not recommend doing this with a handline. Bluefin tuna can attain weights approaching 1,000-pounds or more, they're incredibly powerful swimmers, and even a 150-pounder hooked on an 80-pound rated, standup, tuna outfit will take the average person nearly an hour to land--and that's if you know what you're doing. The largest bluefin I've managed to land tipped the scales at 175-pounds and caught at the Jack-Spot 25-miles southeast of Ocean City, Maryland. The fish was hooked at 10:30 a.m. and it took till a few minutes after high noon to bring it to the side of the boat. At the end of an hour, I handed the rod to a young friend, who gave the rod back to me after just 15 minutes. My arms felt like rubber bands and thankfully, there was another, strong you man on the boat to wield the gaff.
Yep I fished for Blue Fin competitively in 80 and 130 class for many years. Fished on a two Posts, a Buddy Davis a Rybo and a Gamefisherman Express. All sweet boats but the woodies are the best. The Gamefisherman in cold molded epoxy construction with twin MANN's was by far my favorite boat to fish, a simply amazing boat!!

I my opinion the blue fin teenagers, as we called them, weighing 275-350 pounds, are by far and away the longest hardest fights. We once had a 280 pounder spool us to the backing on a 130 rig 13 times before we boated it. That fish actually discolored the aluminum Penn real case... The fight was over 7 hours and we had three guys in the chair rotating which are NOT easy rotations....

The largest fish we caught was slightly over 800 and after about 40 minutes the line went limp. We thought the fish had died but it just gave up cause when she saw the boat she got green again. Never had that happen before or after. Fish was fat and the buyer paid BIG money for it...

I can't even fathom how you could land a blue on a hand line unless you let it drag a float like the stick boats do..

We were lucky to have nice fighting chairs but I have done stand up on blues with 80's and I can tell you that rubber can't even begin to describe how bad those fish beat you up.

Blue fin are perhaps some of the smartest and most elusive fish on the water and by far and away the ultimate catch.. We left the dock daily at 3:30 am unless we were out to Sable or something. We would return at 7-8:00 pm and fished six days per week. One day was boat maintenance. In an average season we'd boat 7-18 blues.... Of course if wee were live lining or chunking we'd catch more but we were fishing strict 80 & 130 trolling rules...

Lot of time spent cleaning the rigs of weeds and going for "boat rides".....

If you have never had a chance to catch a Blue Fin tuna put it on your bucket list.
__________________
______
-Maine Sail / CS-36T


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.




© Images In Posts Property of Compass Marine Inc.


Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 03-02-2012
travlineasy's Avatar
Morgan 33 O.I. Perryville
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 2,240
Thanks: 3
Thanked 52 Times in 43 Posts
Rep Power: 4
travlineasy will become famous soon enough
Couldn't agree more, Main Sail--bluefin tuna rule the North Atlantic.

Dave, the last time I fished for bluefins the bag limit was one fish per boat, and one giant bluefin in your lifetime. All fished had to be tagged and registered and the season was pretty short.

Gary
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 03-02-2012
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: naples fl
Posts: 27
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
jesselee is on a distinguished road
Recipe looks good I'll try it on a Bonita can't find much blue fish down here in s.w florida
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sailboat Fishing dreuge Cruising and Sailing with Children 48 06-11-2013 08:26 AM
Ship rescues 3 from sinking sailboat northeast of Hilo - Honolulu Star-Advertiser NewsReader News Feeds 0 02-12-2012 03:30 PM
Vessel headed to aid disabled sailboat northeast of Hilo - Honolulu Star-Advertiser NewsReader News Feeds 0 02-08-2012 02:50 PM
commercial fishing from sailboat? businessonly805 General Discussion (sailing related) 13 12-06-2011 04:19 PM
Fishing off of a sailboat IronSpinnaker General Discussion (sailing related) 32 04-21-2011 08:25 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:37 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.