Travel Lift Approach - SailNet Community
 22Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 28 Old 03-04-2012 Thread Starter
1979 C&C 30 MK1
 
flyingjib's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Annapolis
Posts: 107
Thanks: 3
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
 
Travel Lift Approach

Hello Gurus,
I have scheduled my first haulout for later this month at Port Annapolis Marina and I really like to avoid looking like a total idiot! To be honest, I'm not really sure how to approach the travel lift bay. Does it make a difference if I approach bow first or stern first? What is the typical haulout procedure? I'm planning to stop by a day before and check things out but I figured I should ask the experts first.

Thanks in advance!
flyingjib is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 28 Old 03-04-2012
Senior Member
 
flyingwelshman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,775
Thanks: 20
Thanked 27 Times in 20 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Re: Travel Lift Approach

I approach bow in and tie off at a dock just outside the travel lift bay. The lift operator usually directs me to a spot as there are usually boats ahead of and behind me.

Once at the dock I tie off and lock my tiller to centre. The boat is manhandled into the slings.

The guys at the lift are always helpful and will give directions.

1989 Hunter 30'
Southern Georgian Bay

The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever. - Jacques Yves Cousteau
flyingwelshman is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 28 Old 03-04-2012
Senior Member
 
chef2sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,074
Thanks: 30
Thanked 58 Times in 54 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: Travel Lift Approach

Bow first..Its just like docking in your slip. Usually you tie up your boat in the Travel lift slip and they guide it in with the straps under it in the appropraite places from there,

Port Annapolis Travel lift slip is not unusual. Dave from Auspicious keeps his boat there, maybe he can comment.

Dave


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
chef2sail is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 28 Old 03-04-2012
HANUMAN
 
RobGallagher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Noank, Connecticut, USA
Posts: 1,463
Thanks: 7
Thanked 22 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 14
 
Re: Travel Lift Approach

Talk to them first. Some places have a dock for you to tie up at just outside, others may put you into a slip and bring you in later under side tow with their work boat.

If they do want you to come in under power it will most likely be bow first. Most likely someone may still meet you at the work dock just outside the lift to take lines so they can keep you centered till the straps are in the right place.

I'm willing to bet they will put you on the work dock and walk your boat in.

p.s. Damn that yard is pricey!
flyingjib likes this.
RobGallagher is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 28 Old 03-04-2012
Just another Moderator
 
Faster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 16,373
Thanks: 101
Thanked 304 Times in 294 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Re: Travel Lift Approach

Depends on the travel lift and the arrangement on the hard.. We've been to several that want you to back in. I'd check with them first.

In any event you virtually never 'drive in'.. and around here you can't ride the lift anyhow so you're off the boat at the finger dock, and they pull the boat into place with boathooks.

Be prepared with a profile drawing or marks or reference points on the boat for avoiding impellers, shaft and strut, know where your keel ends etc so there's no nasty surprises half way up. Pull the knotmeter impeller and insert to plug beforehand to be sure, if you can. Also have an idea where major bulkheads are for placing stands once on the hard.
jrd22, jackdale, SloopJonB and 1 others like this.

Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Faster is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 28 Old 03-04-2012
Morgan 33 O.I. Perryville
 
travlineasy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,247
Thanks: 3
Thanked 127 Times in 112 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Travel Lift Approach

This will depend a lot on your boat and the travel lift configuration itself. In my case the travel lift is more than adequate to lift the 13,000-pound boat and has a 25,000-pound (12-ton) capacity. Normally, the boat would be picked up bow first, but my roller furling system is essentially a solid length of aluminum that goes from the top of the mast to the bow sprit. Consequently, the boat is backed in, the back-stay is removed and the boom lowered so it will clear the lift's cross beam. Once ashore, the boat is lowered on the jack-stands, they're chained in place and the back-stay is reattached.

Regardless of where I have the boat hauled, I always provide the marina with a copy of the boat's construction diagram so he knows exactly where to place the travel lift straps. Some boats, such as my friends Morgan 32.2, has arrows etched into the superstructure indicating the travel lift pickup points. He usually places a couple strips of blue masking tape over them so the spots are easily seen and informs the travel lift operator--just to be on the safe side.

One last tip. Most of the marina place the boats on gravel or crusher-run covered lots. During the first couple weeks, especially if the weather is wet and windy, the jack stands tend to sink into the ground a bit. Be sure to check and tighten them regularly during that time to prevent the boat from shifting and placing too much pressure on the hull.

Good Luck,

Gary
SVAuspicious and flyingjib like this.
travlineasy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 28 Old 03-04-2012
Hmmm
 
Bilgewater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Campbell River, British Columbia
Posts: 514
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Travel Lift Approach

Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingjib View Post
I really like to avoid looking like a total idiot!
You won't look look like an idiot, they get this all the time and every kind of vessel imaginable. Go there and ask them the procedure...that's the way to do it. Or just pull your vessel up to the float and they'll let you know what to do. Every lift is different, every procedure is different, it will work out fine.

The important thing as has been mentioned already is knowing where the straps should sit and have it marked.

Here's an example of a variation in lifts and procedures you could come across.

Lifting - In this case, I secure to the float on the left.





Up the hill - towing the lift with the help of a front end loader.







Back down the hill (under it's own power) You wouldn't find a lift like this anywhere else...it's unique.

jrd22, Faster, chef2sail and 2 others like this.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Impulse III
Truant Pilothouse
Bilgewater is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 28 Old 03-05-2012
Just another Moderator
 
Faster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 16,373
Thanks: 101
Thanked 304 Times in 294 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Re: Travel Lift Approach

Quote:
Originally Posted by seayalatermoonglow View Post
You won't look look like an idiot, they get this all the time and every kind of vessel imaginable. Go there and ask them the procedure...that's the way to do it. Or just pull your vessel up to the float and they'll let you know what to do. Every lift is different, every procedure is different, it will work out fine.

The important thing as has been mentioned already is knowing where the straps should sit and have it marked.

Here's an example of a variation in lifts and procedures you could come across.

Lifting - In this case, I secure to the float on the left.


Up the hill - towing the lift with the help of a front end loader.






Back down the hill (under it's own power) You wouldn't find a lift like this anywhere else...it's unique.
...Only in Lund, eh Steve??

Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Faster is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 28 Old 03-05-2012
Senior Member
 
chef2sail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,074
Thanks: 30
Thanked 58 Times in 54 Posts
Rep Power: 8
 
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: Travel Lift Approach

Now thats unique...


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
chef2sail is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 28 Old 03-05-2012
Hmmm
 
Bilgewater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Campbell River, British Columbia
Posts: 514
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Re: Travel Lift Approach

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
...Only in Lund, eh Steve??
You got it Ron! If you build it...they will come.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Impulse III
Truant Pilothouse
Bilgewater is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Good approach to NYC? labatt General Discussion (sailing related) 5 05-13-2007 12:51 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome