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  #1  
Old 03-06-2012
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What is this Haylard for

I have a in mast halyard that exists the mast about 1/3 down from the top of the mast. The halyard exits towards the bow of the boat. I do have a pole slide fitted on the leading edge of the mast.

What would this halyard be used for?
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Old 03-06-2012
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Re: What is this Haylard for

That's your 'spinnaker pole lift'.. it could also be used to support a whisker pole.. In light air the weight of the pole will drop the spinnaker tack too far down so a pole lift is required.

However as the breeze pipes up, the pole will want to go up and so a pole downhaul is also required and this is the one that has to be very strong. The loads on the pole can be substantial, and the downhaul should be on a bridle attachment (in many cases the pole lift can be direct connected as the loads on it are relatively low - even so many poles have bridles top and bottom) Using a bridle avoids bending moments on the pole itself.
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Re: What is this Haylard for

A downhaul bridle would be used on a end-for-end gybe. For a dip pole gybe the topping lift and the downhaul (foreguy) would be attached at the pole end.

In this photo the downhaul is on a 2:1 purchase and the topping lift is attached to the pole end.



And end-for-end pole has jaws at each end. A dip pole has different fittings on each end, with jaws at just one end.

Dip poles also require separate sheets and guys. And end-for-end can use just sheets with te lazt sheet becoming the guy (perhaps with twings or tweakers)
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Re: What is this Haylard for

While Faster may be correct, other functions are possible.

It may be a halyard for a staysail -- hard to say without knowing what vessel and how she's rigged.
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Re: What is this Haylard for

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Originally Posted by PorFin View Post
While Faster may be correct, other functions are possible.

It may be a halyard for a staysail -- hard to say without knowing what vessel and how she's rigged.
The boat is a mast head sloop with no inner forestay. I believe as others have posted it would be used with the pole. I do have a pole and a wisker pole but have not used these items. I am considering adding a inner forestay and would like to use this halyard with it, but I think it exits the mast too low for use. I would like to add the inner forestay say 1 foot below the masthead so that I do not need running back stays for support. I am not sure if this is possible. Also, I am not sure what type of fitting would be required to attach the inner forestay to the mast. Any thoughts?

The inner forestay would be used with a hank on storm jib and to also stabilize the mast in case of forestay failure (have a roller furled jib on that now). I would plan to be able to disconnect the inner forestay so that jibing is easier, and attach it at deck level when needed. Boat is an S&S 34.
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Re: What is this Haylard for

At 34 feet you are on the cusp of dip pole vs end-for-end. End-for-end can be done with fewer crew. Twin bridles for the topping lift and downhaul with identical jaws on the pole will indicate end-for-end.

The inner stay might be a DIY but a rigger could probably provide more options.
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Re: What is this Haylard for

This model?



Adding an inner forestay as you describe would probably be best within a foot or so of the masthead as you suggest.. however that is going to require a dedicated halyard, either with its own entry sheave/block or the use of a halyard restrainer if you want to use an existing spare jib halyard... Ideally a dedicated block & halyard as the restrainer would have to be off-center to avoid conflicting with the stay and its attachment.

A good fall-back plan for extreme conditions and situations but I'd highly recommending consulting a rigger for the best way to engineer all this.. and don't forget about the required reinforcement for the deck level attachment.
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Re: What is this Haylard for

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Originally Posted by casey1999 View Post
.... I would like to add the inner forestay say 1 foot below the masthead so that I do not need running back stays for support. I am not sure if this is possible. Also, I am not sure what type of fitting would be required to attach the inner forestay to the mast. ....
I believe an inner forestay is most commonly installed further aft, on my 36', it was about 4' aft the headstay. I believe this positioning is planned so the storm jib will most effectively work with the trysail/triple-reef main.

For an inner forestay, you need to find or construct a deck location that can carry the load, such as one that permits attaching the equivalent of a chain plate to a bulkhead, say the aft partition of the anchor locker. Otherwise you may need to construct a partial bulkhead.
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Re: What is this Haylard for

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Originally Posted by Faster View Post
This model?



Adding an inner forestay as you describe would probably be best within a foot or so of the masthead as you suggest.. however that is going to require a dedicated halyard, either with its own entry sheave/block or the use of a halyard restrainer if you want to use an existing spare jib halyard... Ideally a dedicated block & halyard as the restrainer would have to be off-center to avoid conflicting with the stay and its attachment.

A good fall-back plan for extreme conditions and situations but I'd highly recommending consulting a rigger for the best way to engineer all this.. and don't forget about the required reinforcement for the deck level attachment.
Yes, that is the boat. You pic shows the English built version. I have the Australian built version shown below. Only diffierence is the coach roof height. The standing rigging I have matches the English version with the single spreader and fore and aft lowers but I also have the baby forestay as shown in the Australia version. Plan would be to use the aft bulkhead of the chain locker for the inner forestay connection point, probably need to beef it up some.
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Last edited by casey1999; 03-06-2012 at 03:06 PM.
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Re: What is this Haylard for

This may be a crazy idea but here it is:
I will be replacing my broken manual windlass with a Buckalgonquin 7X7 bronze mooring bit. Note this is way oversized for my boat, but bigger is better.
Buck Algonquin...Quality Marine Hardware Since 1955

This could be located such that it stradles the aft chain locker bulkhead and I could strengthen this attachement and tie the mooring bit bolts into a chain plate attached to the bulkhead so that a pull on the mooring bit would pull on the bulkhead. Then take AmSteel line and tie it off to the mooring bit which would then be used as a connection point for the inner forestay.

Do you think this mooring bit could take the required forces of say 3,000 pound up lift?

Last edited by casey1999; 03-06-2012 at 03:19 PM.
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