The Live aboard dream right out of college? - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree17Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 04-03-2012
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Charleston
Posts: 85
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 4
b40Ibis is on a distinguished road
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

Maybe find a boat for sale at a local marina, buy it, and liveaboard/do weekly sails from there. Then when you gain experience move on to the next harbor. If you can support yourself while you do it. In general living on a boat is more of an effort than living on the hard, but it is fun learning how hard!. But it would be an excellent experience and completely doable even if it was for 3-6 months. Sailing to 'India' is a whole other thing compared to docking up in Beaufort or somewhere. Have you ever been offshore on a sailboat for days/weeks at a time? It gets a little old after about three days! Ever heard of 'monkey but'? Maybe just buy a ticket to Bangkok or wherever and charter a boat there and various other place you mentioned?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 04-03-2012
leogallant's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Greer, SC
Posts: 115
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
leogallant is on a distinguished road
The Live aboard dream right out of college?

My son is a sophomore, transferred to College of Charleston and wanted a better alternative to the apartment scene. He found a 30' Newport on Craigslist from college students who were graduated and we brought it up from Hilton Head to Charleston. Boat is structurally sound, but lots to do to get it really sea-worthy. But that's also half the fun. He has LOVED it, and has made some great friends in the marina...advice is never far away when questions about repairs or upgrades arise. I've also had a lot of fun helping with projects, of which there is no end :-)
__________________
Leo
Journey to Charleston on Ubiquitous

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Steve's Ubiquitous Blog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 04-03-2012
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
skyreep is on a distinguished road
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

Thank you all for your responses. Do you mind if I ask what your professions are that allow you to liveaboard cruise for so much of your lives? It is really what I want to do, I'm just unsure as to how I can finance it...
EDIT:
By the way, to give you an idea of the boats I've been looking at, I'm eyeballing the 37-42' Hunters, and Morgans. I looked at Ingrid 38's for a bit too but they're harder to find in my price range it seems, whereas the Hunters and Morgans can be found without too much trouble around the $30,000 range. I particularly like the 41' Out Islands and the 37' Hunters. Of course recommendations are always appreciated.

I'm planning on buying a boat in the 2013 time window and using it as a live-aboard while I work until at least 2014 which would be the earliest I would consider anything more than, for instance, a BVI trip. Any global sailing spanning more than a month or two would probably wait until the 2016-2017 window, as my significant other will have completed her Graduate work, and I will 1) have finished my commitment with the military, and 2) Have had a chance to save up, plan, prepare, etc. Obviously I'm planning a bit ahead but you must realize, I will be out of the loop in on bases until Feb. 2013, and hence I want to prepare as much as possible, as I hope to live aboard when I come home.

Last edited by skyreep; 04-03-2012 at 09:20 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 04-03-2012
RobGallagher's Avatar
HANUMAN
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Noank, Connecticut, USA
Posts: 1,318
Thanks: 7
Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
RobGallagher is on a distinguished road
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

Quote:
Originally Posted by skyreep View Post
Hello Everybody, I just wanted to ask a couple questions.

I'm 19 years old, I live in North Carolina, I'm a Combat Medic in the North Carolina National Guard. My dream has always been a transcontinental cruise, particularly spending time in Greece, Japan, India, and South America. I joined the NCARNG so that I could begin my career as an Emergency Medical Professional, and save some money.
My questions begin in the vague planning of my time abroad. I really can't afford an eccentric plan with a yacht and 4 star restaurants on every continent, however I want to be able to do it without being miserable. So my first question is, what's the least expensive way to begin living aboard? Even if I were docked and living on a boat, I would rather be living on a boat off the coast of North Carolina than in an apartment. So is it realistic to consider calling docks about basically repossessed boats? Or would it be less expensive to consider using my time as a soldier to slowly construct my own cruiser? Perhaps just a used boat? Thank you so much for all your input!

Also, what is a good minimum size for a global cruiser for 2 occupants? 30' ?
I think your best bet, as others have mentioned is to buy a used coastal cruiser, live aboard, cruise on the weekends/vacations and finish your education.

If you buy something decent enough, you can probably sell it for at least 75% of your purchase price.

That being said, YOU have to decide what your budget is.
How much do you want to spend on a boat?
How much can you afford for monthly slip fees?

Yes, you COULD live on the hook, but it will complicate things.
i.e.: You are have to cram for exams and it's blowing 40 - 50 knots, raining and you have to keep an anchor watch all night. Good luck with your test, one night like this could blow a semester.

Life in a slip could mean hot showers every day, marina wifi, power for your laptop, etc.

If you are really lucky maybe you can find a friendly marina that will help you out by trying to rent your slip every weekend and you can hang on the hook or cruise.

IMHO If you shop around 7K - 12K should get you something decent enough to live on.
1970's vintage:
C&C 30 MKI
Catalina 30
Pearson 30
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 04-03-2012
MedSailor's Avatar
Closet Powerboater
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Anacortes PNW
Posts: 2,387
Thanks: 58
Thanked 50 Times in 42 Posts
Rep Power: 7
MedSailor is on a distinguished road
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

Recommended reading:


The Catalina 27 is one of the boats in the book and I'm partial to it. There are scads of them for sale and they're cheap, they have standing head room (for some) and they sail well. They also are set up for an outboard, so you can get a cheap used one now and a nicer one later.

Having done something similar to what you're suggesting (when I quit college I did it to move aboard a 31 footer), what I did was FIRST find the marinas that would allow live aboards (as has been suggested). For me, I found that the 30ft slips had a 3month wait list and the 40foot slips had a 1.5year wait list. That (and lack of funds) sealed it for me, a 31 footer it would be! (they allowed a little bit of overhang in those days. CHECK about overhang now though. A catalina 30 for example is 33+ foot long as measured by some marinas and many won't let you put one in a 30ft slip)

What size is the smallest you can live on? Well, that all depends on you. Personally I'm happier in a tent than a 4000sqft house, so I can go pretty small. Others can't. As a very general rule I'd say that 27 is about the limit for most live-abords and many can't take 27. Also 30ft slips are available the world over in quantity and the Catalina 27 can always fit in a 30ft slip. Living aboard on a 30 footer is VERY common, there are lots of boats in that size that many can live on.

Boat length is an odd thing. Usable space seems to increase by 50% from 25 to 27ft. It seems to double from 27 to 30. After that, usable space doubles every 5 foot of length. Costs double too.

Living aboard is great and spending all that time aboard and at the dock lands you opportunities to learn, to get passage on other boats, to join race crews etc.

Have Fun!

MedSailor
jrd22 likes this.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


I have a sauna on my boat, therefore I win.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 04-03-2012
scratchee's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 363
Thanks: 4
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 3
scratchee is on a distinguished road
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

I was also going to recommend the book that Medsailor posted above. Note that those boats are smaller than the ones you mentioned...and I guess I would recommend that you consider something in those smaller sizes. I don't have a whole lot of experience either, but the size boats you mentioned don't seem to me to square up with the budget or experience level.

One interesting idea from another thread was to drive around to all the marinas in your area, and look for suitable boats with registration stickers that expired several years ago. Get the names of those boat owners and make them an offer.

Have you considered checking to see if you can get a slip on a military base in the area? There appear to be two on Camp Lejeune, and I believe Cherry Point has one as well. That might make a decent boat affordable for you right now. Spend two weeks on her to see if living aboard is right for you.

Finally, in my opinion the proper term would be "trans-oceanic." For a trans-continental trip I believe you'd want the Jeep forum. But maybe that's a special use of the word among boat folk that I'm not aware of.

Last edited by scratchee; 04-03-2012 at 11:49 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 04-04-2012
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
skyreep is on a distinguished road
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

I believe you're right about trans-oceanic. I apologize, and also I'm not on base actually, since I'm national guard I'll be back at home in NC with the exception of one weekend per month when I have to drill at my armory. Although those boats are large for my experience level and current needs, I would rather buy one boat and take more time, classes, etc, to be well versed in it, than have to deal with the boat market to size up after only a couple of years. I would much rather but what I will need for future endeavors, as the extra length would also give me more living space in the time leading up to any trans-oceanic cruising. I would like to find the 36-38 range because it's not so big it's unmanageable and at the same time it's large enough for blue water, and large enough to provide (unneeded but still appreciated) creature comforts such as short showers, decent sized galley, plenty of headroom etc.

I might be wrong here, and I'm not trying to seem adamant, I just don't want to invest in a boat only to turnaround in 3 years and try to flip it for a larger boat.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 04-04-2012
MedSailor's Avatar
Closet Powerboater
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Anacortes PNW
Posts: 2,387
Thanks: 58
Thanked 50 Times in 42 Posts
Rep Power: 7
MedSailor is on a distinguished road
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

Quote:
Originally Posted by skyreep View Post
I might be wrong here, and I'm not trying to seem adamant, I just don't want to invest in a boat only to turnaround in 3 years and try to flip it for a larger boat.
There is real logic to what you say. A boat is something that you are likely to want to pour your heart and soul into fixing up. Even if you do all the work yourself and buy your parts at home depot and swap meets instead of West Marine, boats do still have a way of eating up all your extra cash. So I can see wanting to buy only one.

On the other hand an absolute truism is that the smaller the boat the more you will take it out. What you need is experience and if your boat is easy to take out and sail for an afternoon, or a quick overnighter you will. The 31 footer I started on was a bit big for me and I didn't go out very often. When I did, it was for longer trips, but if I had a catalina 27 or a pacific seacraft 25, I'd be out every sunny afternoon.

Another important point is that you don't really know what you want in your offshore boat. Boat designs vary greatly especially in their undersides. Underwater profile matters. A modern boat is more easily driven in light air, is often "faster" and is much easier to park in a marina. A full keeled boat is more kind to it's crew offshore, and better in a storm, but is "slower" and maneuvering in a marina is so difficult it will make you want to anchor out. These differences and choices affect everything about your boat from it's sailing ability, to its complexity, to its cost, to it's interior etc etc etc.

You need to find out what kind of sailing you will actually do. It's nice to say "I'll always rely on sail" but it's another thing to find out that you actually will motor because you're bored to tears in light air. That's fine, but you'll hate yourself if you've sacrificed accommodations and strength for light air sailing ability and now you never sail in light airs. You might also find that a big, heavy, safe, storm-ready boat is so slow you hate it's sailing characteristics and regret all the emphasis you've put into strength over performance.

These preferences matter. The boats that suit them are very different. Until you know your preferences, and make your own choices, you won't know what kind of boat you really want. Your first boat (like your first girlfriend) is not likely to be the best long-term match.

Also, there is the budget issue. You "could" buy a 36 footer for less than 9K but if she has ocean potential, she'll be in awful shape and she is NOT going to be in a condition where you would likely be sailing her much. If your plan was to only live on her and work on her and sail other peoples boats (like club racing) that would be fine, but there is NO substitute for the experience gained in sailing your OWN boat.

If you choose one from the book I recommended you will have a boat you can afford, one that you can take for a sail at the drop of a hat, AND if you find you're okay with small, you don't HAVE to upgrade because all the boats in the book can (and have done) go around the world. So it could end up being the only boat you need to buy. You need a boat YOU can sail NOW and often.

MedSailor

P.S. Don't buy a wooden (or cement) boat. Just don't. Not okay. Never. I speak as a recovering wooden boat owner.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


I have a sauna on my boat, therefore I win.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by MedSailor; 04-04-2012 at 01:32 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 04-04-2012
chrisncate's Avatar
prwg, NOW!
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,639
Thanks: 18
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 5
chrisncate is on a distinguished road
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

Waiting kills the dream. Do it as soon as possible.
Listening to conventional wisdom kills the dream. You can go outside the box and there are still many innovations to be found. Cruising may be old hat, but refitting/outfitting boats is still wide open and doctrine in this area is nothing to be taken too seriously imo.
Not realizing/accepting that you will need to refit your own boat from top to bottom can kill the dream. Be prepared to work very hard unless you hold the mega millions ticket.
Biting off more than you can chew with a too big boat kills the dream. Go as small as you can stand. 30' is enough for sure.

If you really want it, it's something you realize is a life commitment unless rich - it becomes what you do.

Everyone does it just a bit differently, you either find your niche or you accept that you don't need to necessarily devote your life to this and just sail when you can, and live on land. There is no shame in day-sailing.

We gave up everything to pursue an obsession, and it does have a cost - be aware. We personally are at the end of the major full refit (so much in that sentence, it's so easy to type but so hard to convey what it means in reality) and all I can say at this point is that I am glad we did it this way - I know every flaw, every bolt on my boat and I feel that I am really ready to take her out there now. I have come to believe that those who chose the DIY route have the best chance, maybe even equal/better to those with the checkbook.

Bear in mind my opinion stems from the perspective of (making a boat for) cruising rather than living aboard. So... Imo, yes - you can do it (young and not rich), it is worth it, and it's awesome. Go for it! I personally like a full keel with a cutaway forefoot, narrow beam, low freeboard and smallish cockpit. I like sexy old boats in the classic sense, like folk boats (that style) for example..

Check out Wind and Tide by Jay Fitzgerald for info and inspiration. It's not on most cruisers list of required reading, and he is borish when he gets all philosophical (who isn't though?), but it should be on every younger potential cruisers required reading list imo. Best of luck, and fair winds
MedSailor likes this.

Last edited by chrisncate; 04-04-2012 at 02:21 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 04-04-2012
bljones's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,128
Thanks: 32
Thanked 69 Times in 62 Posts
Rep Power: 7
bljones has a spectacular aura about bljones has a spectacular aura about
Re: The Live aboard dream right out of college?

Quote:
Originally Posted by skyreep View Post
Hello Everybody, I just wanted to ask a couple questions.

I'm 19 years old, I live in North Carolina, I'm a Combat Medic in the North Carolina National Guard. My dream has always been a transcontinental cruise, particularly spending time in Greece, Japan, India, and South America. I joined the NCARNG so that I could begin my career as an Emergency Medical Professional, and save some money.
My questions begin in the vague planning of my time abroad. I really can't afford an eccentric plan with a yacht and 4 star restaurants on every continent, however I want to be able to do it without being miserable. So my first question is, what's the least expensive way to begin living aboard? Even if I were docked and living on a boat, I would rather be living on a boat off the coast of North Carolina than in an apartment. So is it realistic to consider calling docks about basically repossessed boats? Or would it be less expensive to consider using my time as a soldier to slowly construct my own cruiser? Perhaps just a used boat? Thank you so much for all your input!

Also, what is a good minimum size for a global cruiser for 2 occupants? 30' ?
I like this kid.

Lots of good advice here, the boat advice i will add is be careful of a disease that many newbies pick up- "LOA creep." Here you are in post 1 asking about a "good minimum size... 30'?", then by page 3 you are talking about "eyeballing 37-42' Morgans."

My wife and I bought a pompous little pig of a 23 foot cruiser with the intention of buying or building a larger boat next season...
That was in 2008.
We still have the same boat.
It has adapted to us, and we have adapted to her, over the years, to the point that the two of us and our two dogs are comfortable aboard from May-October, without shorepower or pressure water.

The bigger the boat, the bigger the costs, and while a perfectly serviceable boat under 30' LOA can be found under $5K, sometimes free, any boat OVER 30' LOA in the same bottom feeder price bracket is gonna be much closer to being on the bottom... and the costs to bring her back to acceptable will break your heart, your budget, your back and your dreams. A general rule of thumb is that just about every item or task on a 35' boat is TWICE as expensive as the same job or item on a 25' boat- painting, rigging, sails, electrical, etc.

Catalina 27, Cherubini Hunter 27 or 30, Grampian 30, Ericson 27, Oday 27, Pearson 26 are all solid choices in the sub $10k bracket which will serve you well for your purposes, not gross out prospective girlfriends (trust me, you find out who the keepers are when they learn that they have to pump the head... every time.) or alarm your parents.
MedSailor likes this.
__________________
It's 5 o'clock somewhere:


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Live aboard dream boat zaldog Boat Review and Purchase Forum 14 04-05-2012 04:17 PM
College liva aboard stevo39th Living Aboard 22 07-31-2010 01:21 AM
Live aboard- working on life long dream KMartin17 Introduce Yourself 4 01-29-2010 09:09 AM
Another way to live the dream apkaplan General Discussion (sailing related) 10 05-29-2008 11:50 AM
help live a dream liquidharmony Boat Review and Purchase Forum 6 09-03-2007 07:43 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:20 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.