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milesinnz 04-08-2012 08:19 PM

NZ/UK national buying older yacht in the USA
 
Hi,

I've been a member of this community for a while now, but never posted.

I am in New Zealand and have been thinking for some time now, about buying a yacht on the West Coast of the US and maybe taking it back to the Pacific Islands and then at some stage to NZ.

I have been impressed by the support and help given by the members of this community.

I think I understand most of the issues involved. I have the practical skills in yacht construction and maintenance as well extensive sailing in European waters - but no big ocean crossings.

I was wondering what the predominance of Osmosis was on late 70's yachts of the like of the Islander 36.

Also my understanding is that if I am to avoid local purchase taxes the yacht has to be out of US waters within 30 days? This just seems too short a time to make sure the yacht is in good order and there is a decent weather window - very worrying.

What would be the advisability of taking the yacht South to Mexico as a shake down cruise but having somewhere where it could be hauled out of the water and worked on by myself in Mexico if this proves to be necessary?

I feel getting stuck in some expensive bureaucratic nightmare is more daunting than the sailing.

There is also the issue of the proper paper work for departing from the USA - would having the yacht registered under the UK flag (SSR) but purchased in the USA pose any additional problems?

All suggestions gratefully received....

Regards

Miles

TQA 04-09-2012 12:15 PM

Re: NZ/UK national buying older yacht in the USA
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by milesinnz (Post 855989)
Hi,

I've been a member of this community for a while now, but never posted.

I am in New Zealand and have been thinking for some time now, about buying a yacht on the West Coast of the US and maybe taking it back to the Pacific Islands and then at some stage to NZ.

I have been impressed by the support and help given by the members of this community.

I think I understand most of the issues involved. I have the practical skills in yacht construction and maintenance as well extensive sailing in European waters - but no big ocean crossings.

I was wondering what the predominance of Osmosis was on late 70's yachts of the like of the Islander 36.

Also my understanding is that if I am to avoid local purchase taxes the yacht has to be out of US waters within 30 days? This just seems too short a time to make sure the yacht is in good order and there is a decent weather window - very worrying.

What would be the advisability of taking the yacht South to Mexico as a shake down cruise but having somewhere where it could be hauled out of the water and worked on by myself in Mexico if this proves to be necessary?

I feel getting stuck in some expensive bureaucratic nightmare is more daunting than the sailing.

There is also the issue of the proper paper work for departing from the USA - would having the yacht registered under the UK flag (SSR) but purchased in the USA pose any additional problems?

All suggestions gratefully received....

Regards

Miles

I recently bought a CG docuented boat in the USA USVI and transferred it to SSR. You get a cert from the CG when you deregister it which you need.

Once you have the SSR you can apply for a cruising permit which allows you to keep the boat in US waters for one year. If you have a NZ passport this may not apply see more info here

You will need the B1/B2 visa.

If you buy through a broker they will do most of paper work but you will have to visit in person at times N.B. US gov. offices dealing with maritime matters are often NOT on the waterfront but miles inland. A real PITA.

ALSO DO NOT EXPECT ALL US GOV. OFFICIALS TO BE AWARE OF THE PROCEDURES EVEN IF IT IS THEIR JOB. Be patient and ask for a superior if they appear confused. The rules can be applied some what arbitrarily and there is overlap between state and federal rules at times.

having said that I had no problems other than a very stroppy officer who insisted that I was anchoring in the wrong place as his out of date paperwork gave my designated anchorage as being in anther part of the island. Part of the problem was I had not removed the registration letters from the bow.

My 78 boat had been epoxy coated below the water line.

Don't know about Mexico.

There are some really good deals to be had in the USA just now. Some very motivated sellers.

milesinnz 04-09-2012 04:01 PM

Re: NZ/UK national buying older yacht in the USA
 
Hello TQA,

Thank you for your very helpful response. I am amazed at the depth of knowledge there is on this site.

I have NZ and UK passports.

So you didn't have to leave US waters within the 30 days to then re-enter and then getting a longer stay cruising visa?

Do you know what the regulations are for departing US waters? I think there is some form you should get which is needed for the country you will be entering - like Mexico? I read on these pages of someone having their yacht impounded because they did not have this bit of paper when they entered Mexico. Are there differences between a US yacht departing and a foreign registered yacht departing?

Funny, my old yacht in the UK is up for sale and it is stated as having some osmosis yet it was a 1981 hull and I put two part epoxy below the water line. I contacted the broker and he put it down to having spent the last 7 years in fresh water.

Yes, I see some amazing deals in the US...

Regards

Miles

TQA 04-09-2012 07:30 PM

Re: NZ/UK national buying older yacht in the USA
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by milesinnz (Post 856282)
So you didn't have to leave US waters within the 30 days to then re-enter and then getting a longer stay cruising visa?

No I did not, just applied for the cruising permit and my dereg cert and bill of sale was enough BUT this a grey area and the rules are sometimes applied in different ways by different sets of officials. In my case the problem could have been solved by a visit to the BVI.

Quote:

Originally Posted by milesinnz (Post 856282)

Do you know what the regulations are for departing US waters? I think there is some form you should get which is needed for the country you will be entering - like Mexico? I read on these pages of someone having their yacht impounded because they did not have this bit of paper when they entered Mexico. Are there differences between a US yacht departing and a foreign registered yacht departing?

Funny, my old yacht in the UK is up for sale and it is stated as having some osmosis yet it was a 1981 hull and I put two part epoxy below the water line. I contacted the broker and he put it down to having spent the last 7 years in fresh water.

Yes, I see some amazing deals in the US...

Regards

Miles

NOONSITE is the best source here see CLICKY

Yes you must have the ZARPE which is the clearance from your last port.

This is common throughout most of the Caribbean although the penalties for not having it are not always so serious.

On arrival you need to be organised and collect lots of bits of expensive paper.

This list is from noonsite NOTE the fishing licence!

Quote:

On entering Mexico, a Temporary Import Permit (TIP) must be obtained. This can be done at instruccionesIITV_ing These Permits are now entered onto a national database and are cancelled when a bost leaves the country.

The TIP also allows replacement parts to be imported duty free. Although this can be subject to different interpretation by customs officials. There is a guideline for obtaining the clearance documents required to bring in parts at SUSPENDIDO - Account Suspended.


Necessary Current Documents when sailing to Mexico:- you'll want to have the current documents and paperwork - — both the originals and about five copies. 1) The original of your vessel documentation — with current stamp — or state registration. 2) Passports for the entire crew. 3) Proof of Insurance — mostly only required by marinas. 4) Fishing Permits — even if you're just carrying fishing gear. 5) Mexican Tourist Cards — pick them up at your first port. 6) Crew List 7) Notorized permission letter for children who are minors if they are not accompanied by both their parents. 8) Letter of Authorization if a captain is to be left in charge of the boat.

Each person on board must have a fishing licence if such tackle is carried on board. Spot checks are made, and simply having fishing tackle on board is considered by the Mexican authorities sufficient reason to need a licence. The cost ranges from US$100 for a day to an annual licence costing about US$500 (2011).

The licences can be obtained online at SUSPENDIDO - Account Suspended or Official Fishing Permits / Best Baja Fishing or from the Mexican Fisheries Department, 2550 5th Street, San Diego, California 92103-6622, USA or on arrival from the local Fisheries Department.

Last updated October 2010.
As you can see visiting Mexico is a bit of a PITA in comparison to most of the Caribbean.

Also sometimes some of these sorts of problems can be solved with a small gift to a suitable charity of the officials choice. However unless cruisers understand what is expected they may miss the signals. Ask around for advice from other cruising boats. I know in other south american countries a lot of the problems vanish when you employ an agent to deal with the paperwork. However I have not heard this said of Mexico.

milesinnz 04-09-2012 07:47 PM

Re: NZ/UK national buying older yacht in the USA
 
Goodness, you have given me a bit to digest...

Thanks for your help and guidance - much appreciated...


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