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  #31  
Old 07-07-2012
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

Alan I'm sure we've all tried sitting on deck and looking at the horizon and other head games. Psychology only goes so far, although some folks take hypnotherapy and say it helps too.

NASA did extensive research and their results are about the same. To avoid motion sickness? Sit under a tree.
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Old 07-07-2012
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
When I was in the U.S. Navy aboard a 760-foot heavy cruiser, there were times when nearly everyone onboard was seasick. This was the case in the North Atlantic during Hurricane Hazel. At times there were a couple dozen guys in sick-bay, strapped into their bunks with a trashcan tied to the stanchion to prevent it from moving away. Several had IVs in their arm to keep them hydrated. We didn't have anyone die, but we did have a couple sailors airlifted to a base hospital to recover, which sometimes took a week or more.

As for rupturing anything, it's pretty much impossible. Granted, if you have the dry heaves, it may feel like something is going to burst, but this is the result of esophageal spasms, which causes the person to wretch his or her guts out, while producing little or no stomach contents.

Dehydration is the main concern with seasickness. The best way of avoiding this is to keep yourself hydrated at all times. However, instead of gulping down a bottle of water, just take a few sips every five minutes or so, thus allowing the fluid, preferably water, to be metabolized into the system and not lay in the stomach. Ginger-ale and Coca-cola can provide you with other needed nutrients in the form of carbohydrates from the sugar content, plus has the added benefit of a soothing effect on the stomach. However, the carbonation adds gas to the stomach, which is not what you want to do to a person experiencing motion sickness. It's best to allow the soda to sit in an open container until most of the carbonation evaporates, and drink the contents ice-cold and flat. Far fewer problems, but not quite as tasty.

The vast majority of seasickness remedies are nothing more than potent antihistamines, and they usually work best when taken before motion sickness symptoms begin. Side effects, and they all have them, usually consist of dry mouth and drowsiness, but in some instances, the effects can be more severe. In rare instances, the side effects can be fatal, therefore it's best to consult a physician before taking any medication that you don't normally use.

I've been very fortunate in that I have never been seasick since I got out of the Navy. For some, unexplained reason, while aboard that massive ship, I heaved my guts out for several days, sometimes up to a week, before I got accustomed to the slow, rolling motion. Put me on a smaller boat and I'm fine. The one caveat to that is I cannot stand the smell of diesel. That seems to set things in motion and really makes me feel rotten while at sea. I don't think I'm alone with the diesel fume reaction, because everyone else I know has the same problem with diesel fumes.

Good Luck,

Gary
Actually Gary you can rupture your esophagus which is often fatal. Never seen a case of Boerhaave's syndrome but it happens from time to time.
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  #33  
Old 07-07-2012
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

There was quite a lot of talk last year about an incident where a yacht outbound from CA to HA had multiple problems including one crew who was in fact medevac'd with a ruptured esophagus after a couple of days of severe heaving.

If they'd pressed on to HA instead of turning back into medevac range, he'd have bled out and died.
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Old 07-07-2012
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

In the 15 years I worked in medicine, primarily at University of Maryland Hospital and John's Hopkins Hospital, I only saw 2 incidences of Boerhaave's syndrome, both of which were successfully treated with surgical intervention. One of the patients was relatively old, I'm guessing in his late 60s, and had suffered from severe acid reflux for two decades, which likely caused esophageal erosion. In his case, the esophageal lining was so thin it was nearly impossible to suture. The second case, which was a relatively young lady, seemed to have no underlying cause, and she spent many, many weeks in intensive care after surgery due to secondary infections that had set in shortly after the esophagus leaked into the thoracic cavity. She claimed that it occurred when she coughed and she felt a horrible pain in her chest and abdomen. Unfortunately, it was not immediately diagnosed in the ER, which led to further complications.

Usually, but not always, Boerhaave's syndrome requires a significant amount of internal, esophageal pressure to cause the esophagus to rupture. When I person is seasick, at least from my own personal experiences, it doesn't take long to completely empty the stomach contents overboard. I believe it would be a bit difficult to build up a significant amount of internal, esophageal pressure, even when experiencing dry heaves, when the stomach is nearly empty. But, I guess anything is possible, especially when it comes to seasickness.

I would hope that if someone developed seasickness to the point where they were in imminent danger of dying, they would take appropriate action--even if it meant taking up another form of recreation on dry land.

Good topic,

Gary
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Old 07-08-2012
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

It's a favorite bust your balls question to junior residents but it just doesn't happen very often. And yes often they get mediastinitis as well. I've just never seen it. Only ten percent of esophageal ruptures are from vomiting which is Boorhaves. About 60 percent is iatragenic and the rest like the older man.

I think in Boorhaves the mechanism of injury is excessive intraesophageal pressure with low intrathoracic. I have heard of rupture with vomiting in someone with a stricture.

I'll stop now before I bore people to death.
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

Quote:
Originally Posted by scratchee View Post
I've been seasick many times, and my favorite remedy is to sit under a tree until it passes.
Wow!... How big is your boat??
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

Man this the pee out of me,,,,,,surgical intervention to your throat in tact?
Having put down the proverbial 10 thousand hours at sea under some US Navy skippers who had to answer to fleet command who themselves are nothing more then political desk jockeys who know NOTHING about being at sea,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
and oh,,,,,,,,did I forget to mention my experience under sail inland and seaward?
I just luv the ones who enjoy sticking in your face.
Let me just short cut that matter to say that I have been on vessels both under sail and "power" where walking on the bulkheads at times were preferable to "passageways".
Nobody ikes being there unless thay are sickos like me who enjoy waving a tight fist to the sea and the heavens while hanging for dear life.
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

Nothing enrages me more then the thought of having to clean up the blood from my own busted face after the storm passes.
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

The finest crew member is the one that can take go tumbling around the cabin and come bloody enough to man the nav station with alacrity AND pump the bilge by hand.
All others need not apply.
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Re: Seasick & Singlehanding

I have invited many a vessel to just DIE.
I have yet to meet one.
Damned things just defy me at every turn.
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