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  #11  
Old 05-29-2012
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

it seems to me that the only advantage to buying a cheap fixer upper is in the end you can know exactly what you have ,where its located whats likely to be a problem,if you repair,replace or upgrade virually everything it will cost many times what the market value is and by the time your done ,its time to start all over again
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  #12  
Old 05-29-2012
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

While I would want to be sure the boat was safe, I suspect you won't be putting a 22ft boat through too much hardcore torture. Or shouldn't be.

The soft deck does concern me a bit. Cracked gel coat does not.

Best. Get out there and sail her. She will have needs you don't even know about yet, so save some of your resources until you know what they are. They all do.
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  #13  
Old 05-29-2012
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

Quote:
I could actually slap on bottom paint finish putting everything together and get $3500 for my boat in a heartbeat if I didn't want it anymore.
Do it now, best idea in the whole thread, don't waste another of your "short seasons".
You learn boats and sailing with sea time not drudge time trying to build something seaworthy on asphalt.
I think you'd be much better off with that Capri or even the Freedom in your craigslist reference in all respects.
Remember, the prime objective is SAILING right ? Not trying to resurrect something that was once a sailboat, your time is much more valuable than anything you can accomplish on this boat(s).
You can only sail in summer ? like 90 days? I sail year round near San Diego, all my life, and I'm old, and my only regret in life ? Not enough summer days under sail.
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  #14  
Old 05-29-2012
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bljones- lmao! Great one.

Knots, i couldn't agree more.

After all of the work i've done on my boat, i feel like i have an intimate knowledge of every sq. inch of it. Not too worried anymore. If anything, after working so hard on getting the boat ready, once everything is done, the excitement has kinda worn off. Haven't gotten to sail nearly as much as i had wanted to. A couple of unanticipated setbacks have dampened the excitement. As far as trust goes, however, i am not worried about the boat, only about my limited ability to sail it.
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Old 05-29-2012
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

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I suspect you won't be putting a 22ft boat through too much hardcore torture. Or shouldn't be.
Just go sailing. Don't worry too much about the mast. In two or three years, you'll be wiser, sell or ditch the boat, and approach the next one with more experienced eyes. We've all been there to varying degrees.

You need to increase your sailing to work ratio. Should never be less than 1:1. Right now, I'm at 1:3 for this year which needs serious remedy.

Go sailing, you've done enough for now.
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  #16  
Old 05-30-2012
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

tinkering, patching and repairs are done on weekends when your alone, the ones where the wife and kids are there should be having fun sailing roasting hotdogs on a island looking across the bay where the boat lies.
boating is a hobby that takes years to perfect and accomplish. You wont get it on the first boat either so sail the gurl and enjoy her while she's in your charge.
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  #17  
Old 05-30-2012
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PPPPPP42 View Post
EDIT: forgot to mention, another thing I need to fix that shows me how flexy the hull design is, in both boats the hard drain tube from the cockpit was snapped in half due to the cockpit moving independently from the transom, its actually been replaced and re-snapped on the 76 already so I will be either cutting out and replacing it with a super flexible plastic (a bother) or just chopping the middle out and hose clamping rubber hose onto it (more likely since it'll stop ripping itself out of the fiberglass then).
I would guess my sailboat is similar. The cockpit tub sets inside the rear section of the boat and basically only touches where it becomes the cockpit coaming. There is a gap between the rear of the cockpit and the actual boat transom. Presumably this gap is so you can take care of the bolts that secure the gudgeons. Mine too has a tube connecting the cockpit sump to the transom. Mine too has moved enough so that the tube loosened. The last owner basically resealed it with silicon caulking. This obviously wasn't much of a fix and I'm going to have to do something more elaborate to improve it. If the tub sways too much then one solution is to put braces between the cockpit tub and hull bottom. I might use something like 2" schedule 40 PVC pipe (possibly thinner but it has to be stiff enough not to buckle). I would have to put the pieces in at an angle to provide bracing. Three pieces 120 degrees apart would secure it in every direction. If the tub doesn't move forward then you could probably just do two from the transom corner.

If you don't like glassing in a confined space you might be able to tension the cockpit tub with turnbuckles to stop it from swaying. However, this depends on finding a solid place on the boat hull to attach to (on my boat the transom is probably the strongest), finding a strong enough point on the tub to attach to (this could require reinforcement), and it requires that the turnbuckles not get in the way of anything important. Bracing is probably harder to do but can't really cause any problems unless you block something. Turnbuckles require more care. And, if the tub moves up and down then you would still need at least one brace underneath.

The existing cockpit drain is also too small; it's only about 1/2" in diameter. I would like to make it larger but that might not work with the lower gudgeon right above it. I might need to change the direction to get it away from the gudgeon bolt. Looks like I'm going to have to spend some time under the cockpit. But, not today.
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  #18  
Old 05-30-2012
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinidoc View Post
I recently bought an OOD34 that had been essentially left to rot so got it at what seemed a steal. After gutting it completely the joy of my purchase soon disappeared as the list of parts to change continues to grow - new engine, new wiring and everything electrical, new rigging, recover all cushions etc etc. Luckily only a few panels of wood were rotten. I'm hoping the sails can last me a couple of years but even those will likely need changing soon but they haven't been tested.

My point is that you are correct in that if you can't jump on your new boat and sail, the magic vanishes. Even my kids now hate it when I say lets go down by the boat.
I don't know how old your kids are but I would think they would want a sailboat they could sail alone rather than one that requires a committee. Can you even single hand that boat? My impression of the Offshore One Design 34 is that it is a thousand mile boat, that it doesn't really stretch its legs until you've gone 200 miles. I can't see it as a daysailer when even my 20 footer is pushing the limits of convenience for daysailing. If I'm not mistaken in a 10mph wind your sheets can have 100 lbs of pull. A sheet pull strong enough to dislocate your shoulder seems like more work than fun to me. It sounds like a nice boat for a long trip but to have fun I would think something smaller would be better.
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  #19  
Old 05-30-2012
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PPPPPP42 View Post
I have no interest in a boat too small to have a cabin
If your boat is not ready to sail then I would suggest getting a smaller boat to have something to sail until you get your boat fixed. You don't have to be married to a smaller boat; it's just something temporary. For example, I saw a 14' daysailer on CL up around Duluth for $1,000. That's a very convenient boat to hop in and go. If that is too much you could build a PD Racer for $200 or $300. That would give you something to sail and remind you of why you are working on the larger boat. If you want to weekend but you only have a dinghy then you take along a tent and sleep in that (at a KOA or a state park with plumbing). Or you can stay at motel 6 and go daysailing after breakfast. Not having a cabin doesn't have to prevent you from having fun now. I've sailed with people who slept in tents next to the water, people who spent the night at a motel, and people who had boats the size of a West Wight Potter 15 with just enough space for two people to sleep. Again this will keep your spirits up and remind you why you are working on the big boat.
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Re: Do you really know and trust your boat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
Old boats are like ugly women.
All boats are like women. Some you love, some you put up with, some you can't wait to get rid of.
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