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  #21  
Old 06-05-2012
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

I don't normally get queezy, but it's happened when I was hot, tired, and dehydrated on a long day of boating, and inside the cabin. Once I got outside to see the land, I was fine.
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Old 06-05-2012
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

To echo others' experiences, I grew up fishing and running around Trinity and Galveston bays in 14 aluminum boats and some bigger, and never once got sick. Running from Ft. Lauderdale to Biscayne last year it hit me. Not when on deck, but went down to do some navigation, and figured out I better be a damn fast navigator with the calipers, 'cause I'm good for about 10 minutes below deck, and that's all. No problems since.

It may help just to know you're not alone.
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Old 06-05-2012
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
Had a good friend tell me once (very accomplished long distance sailor): Everyone gets seasick... we all just have different thresholds.

SOmoeone above mentioned diesel fumes. They get me too. Going down below and making plots gerts me in seas about 10+ for 24+ hours. I know my threshold. Once I get sick, that's it and I am usually fine.

I have found that some people are extremely sensitive to it. Medicatoins you should conider are Scopolamine (put on about 24 hours ahead of time, though some will say 6 hours early), phenegren, and valium (for vertigo). All of these are prescritpion only and docs are really careful with Valium as it is addictive.

You need to find something though. I wonder if the valium might not be the trick for you since it could be anxiety. Also, ginger snaps and peppermint are the non medicinal options. If none of this works and you are finding yourself being sick for days on end, it strikes me you have an inner ear problem or simply are one of those people that are very sensitive to motion. Can you read in a car? What about a plane?

My warning to you is that many of these meds (ginger and pepermint aside), have side effects that vary with individuals. Take them before you get on a boat to test them. DIscuss this issue with you doctor. You may have a lot of fluid in your ears that is screwing with your balance. SImple OTC meds like Alavert or Sudafed with Psuedoephedrine (can be used to make Meth so have to get from behind pharmacy counter) may help with the allergies and decongestion. Liek I said, Valium is good for vertigo and anxiety, both of which may b effecting you. If none of those meds work and you are sick over 48 hours at sea, well, I would look into a differnt type of boat - like a hard chimed boat that planes or partially planes (non-sailboat).

Anything over 48 hours sick is a danger to me. I don't even like 24 hours. On a small boat, that person becomes a real liability. You can become sick enough to endanger yourself and the crew taking care of you can become taxed and endanger them as well. Not trying to sound like doom, but I personally would not intentionally let anyone on the boat with me that got sick over 24 hours. Too dangerous for everyone involved. But you can't help what you can't help. SO talkk to your physician and start on some meds and get your ears checked out.

Brian
Thanks everyone for the responses. So far I've tried mescaline (sp?) dramamine and I think benzodrine. They all seem to help, but put me to sleep quickly and for a long time. My 'plan' is to single hand so this obviously won't work.

So I'm reluctant to try vallium too because I think it zonks me out pretty completely.

I've also taken alavert, claratin and benodryl for pollen allergies I have, and I don't *think* they work, but I usually only take them inland where the pollen is

I do get sick in a car if I try to use a laptop for too long. I don't get sick in planes, but as a child I would barf every time so I guess I'm 'prone' to getting motion sick.

I'm also pretty adverse to meds you have to apply beforehand. I mean if you are departing a trip offshore, and take that to get over the initial period, are you fine afterward or are you just delaying the sick part & taking meds 24/7 on a long passage?

I guess the bottom line is I'd hate to spend a few years fixing up a boat and then selling it the day I get to Hawaii (assuming I survive 30 days of vomit)

Last edited by xymotic; 06-05-2012 at 03:22 PM.
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Old 06-05-2012
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

I almost never get queasy, and neither does my wife. But the condition of having a combination pitching and rolling motion, like when the seas are off your quarter, can get either of us. Going down below in those conditions would totally finish the job. Ginger does help!

If I remember correctly, John Guzzwell, who sailed his little sub 24-ft Trekka around the world, reported getting sick for a couple or few days pretty much every time he took off from a landfall.

If it were me, I'd make sure I got in as much coastal sailing as possible to see if acclimatization helps, and have plenty of the easy fixes handy to see what else might help--ginger, wrist bands, etc. If it turns out they work for you in those mildly queasy situations, or worse, that might give you some confidence that it isn't hopeless.
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Old 06-05-2012
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

I've been in and out of boats from the age of 8-9; I've gotten 'that feeling' a few times in small (i.e. 'not Navy') boats but I don't think I've ever hurled over the rail (yet). Generally, it is when I go below and lose my view of the horizon. I recover soon after getting back on deck.

The absolute worst was on the submarine:
(the screen goes all hazy/wavy and the text at the bottom declares "USS Hawkbill, northern Pacific, circa 1987)
The seas were crazy big and our operation called for us to stay at periscope depth for an extended period. Sturgeon class submarines have round hulls (not 'rounded', actually 'round') and they will roll massively. Back and forth. 30 degrees? 35? "Oh, my that was a big one." Almost everyone onboard was feeling it; those that didn't were making peanut butter and sardine sandwiches (sailors are assholes).

The gear in my equipment space was water-cooled and if I sat with my eyes closed and my cheek against the cool side of the Weapons Data Converter, it was bearable. The problem was that one of my duties was to relieve the Officer of the Deck on the periscope. You might think "Once I get to see the horizon, I'll fine." You'd be wrong. Imagine, in just one eye, a round view of the world that has:

1. A horizon that drops out of sight and then reappears to fill the view with all water (looking port or starboard)

OR

2. A horizon that tilts 30-35 degrees (looking forward or aft)

So periscope duty wasn't much fun. After 6 hours or so, the captain used his authority to deviate from the operation plan and got us down deep where subs belong.

The only bags the boat had to hand out were clear; if one person lost it, it would start a chain reaction.

One guy hurled all over his sonar control panel (I've forgotten the real equip name) and was given some wipes and Qtips. No one on board was going to clean it up for him.
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

Quote:
Originally Posted by xymotic View Post
Thanks everyone for the responses. So far I've tried mescaline (sp?)
I'll bet that was an interesting trip....

(pun intended)
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

In 30 years I never have, but I won't presume that means I never will.
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

Quote:
Originally Posted by xymotic View Post
Thanks everyone for the responses. So far I've tried mescaline (sp?) dramamine and I think benzodrine. They all seem to help, but put me to sleep quickly and for a long time. My 'plan' is to single hand so this obviously won't work..............
You take mescaline for sea sickness? That's some trip you would be on I would think.
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

Quote:
Originally Posted by xymotic View Post
Like many people here, I have this 'dream' of casting off and circling the globe. But so far I've had limited offshore experience, and it has not been good:

I sailed from Bara de Navidad (s. mx) to San Diego on a delivery.
puked for 12 days straight. I thought maybe I got a bug in MX, & I was hoping it was not seasickness.

I made a few trips to Catalina island and didn't really get seasick, but then a couple times I did get ill at night on the mooring in light seas. Didn't feel better til I hit a dock.

Most recently I've spent a month on a 68' luxury motor Yacht on the inside passage. So far EVERY open ocean passage has put me down for the count.

I got extremely seasick very quickly on the dock at the frikken Annapolis boat show a few years ago. Though in my defense it was really rough, and REALLY weird motion.

Most recently I got sick at the dock.

So I'm getting more than a little depressed. On the one hand, the sailboats I've been on had better motion that the motorboat. But OTOH if I'm getting sick on a 68' 100 ton boat with stabilizers in 6-8' seas on a 10-20 mile stretch, how it the heck am I going to single-hand around the world?

Are any of you captains out there sailing a lot dealing with seasickness? Everybody says it goes away... um when? I've been on this trip a month.
Is it possible to get seasick non-personally? Maybe vicariously through others? Sounds better than doing it yourself.
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  #30  
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Re: Do you personally get seasick?

lol, ok I got more than the spelling wrong I guess
Meclizine
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