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  #511  
Old 02-25-2013
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Re: The future of the sailing world. Why are there so few young people cruising??

My son is 23. We sailed together many times on various lakes and Pamlico Sound. He is so busy with his job, paying off college debt and making a living, we hardly ever sail together. I got him interested in stand-up paddle boarding (SUP) recently - we have two nice boards I bought used (they used to be old windsurfing boards). He loves both sailing and SUP but rarely goes out to do it as he is so busy with taking care of the basics.
So from where I stand, it is primarily lack of time and money.
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  #512  
Old 02-28-2013
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Cool Re: The future of the sailing world. Why are there so few young people cruising??

Hey, I'm young! in my twenties- Just took up sailing last year (cruising, not racing.) Unfortunatly I had every conceivable issue getting her in water :X.
I think the real reason there arn't more of "us yungins" out sailing is price- Boating is costly- I'm doing all I can to manage the boat and my student loans.
Consider:
a smaller new motor boat can start at 8000 list. Comparable sailboats (in terms of LOA) from three years ago list 6000-7000 used.

Another point may be that motor boating, and this is totally my opinion I have no data to back this so don't keel haul me. But, motor boating is probably a much more attractive venue to people our age, largely because there is'nt a real skill set involved with it. You don't need to know how to tie a bunch of knots and what line dose what, how to run the lines or what to do if a line breaks. Motor boating I feel has fewer facets, ya got your lights and an engine. take it out when you and you'r buddys wanna get wet. Then, take it home when yur done.

I bought a 33' (which is quickly becoming the love of my life.) I spent a good chunk of change just to buy her and now I'm fixing her. I can see how buying something as expensive as a sailboat only to have to work on her could be a turn off.

In terms of where the industry is heading? I have never really thought about it. The market will survive thats for sure it will just change. Industrys always do this. I dont think the lack of young people involved will starve the industry. Our peers are young today but that only lasts a while, as they age thier intrests may change, give em a few years to see the light :-)
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  #513  
Old 02-28-2013
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Re: The future of the sailing world. Why are there so few young people cruising??

I just bought a 31' Columbia with new 20hp universal diesel (80 hrs) for $7000. Full time cruising with wife and 8yo son. We are having a ball. We just got to Florida from Md were we purchased the boat. Took us 6 weeks and my son is having a blast. Looking forward to getting to the Keys were we can go swimming and fishing and beach combing.
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  #514  
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There aren't any tangible reasons to "cruise" or "voyage"

There are myriad tangible reasons not to.

Other than maybe a photo album, and some real teak holly and mahogany I have no tangible benefits from all the time I spend on boats. And I guess the wood would be better off in a house.

It's all internal. And as such lacking intrinsic value.

As a society we assign worth more on a basis of intrinsic rather than sentimental value. We also have assigned life periods during which there is an expectation of which type of value we are expected to pursue- and as such which has more worth. During childhood we are pursuing (other than formal education, which is a tangent I will spare you) primarily items or experiences of sentimental value. As we move into adolescence and then young adulthood there is the expectation that we leave behind childish things and pursue items and experience of intrinsic value- which can parlayed into experience with sentimental value. Ie a two week charter or a week in (fill in the blank destination)

And then there is an expectation (and its new, call it 70 years old +\-) that when we hit 65 or so, we will be free of the need to pursue wealth, etc (intrinsic value) and we will bask in the glory of our golden years pursuing experience and items of sentimental value.

Our society has relegated experience that has no "tangible" or intrinsic value to the realm of children and elderly. Oh- and two weeks vacation time per annum

How do you assign value? What to you has or holds real worth?

"You need to grow up. There'll be time to cruise when you retire"
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  #515  
Old 03-01-2013
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Re: The future of the sailing world. Why are there so few young people cruising??

a cruise or voyage indicates a beginning and end.....when I set out next summer I will not be coming back and I don't have to be to any place by any time. I will be a "cruiser" but will not be going on "a cruise". Just sailing off into the tropical sunset.
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  #516  
Old 03-01-2013
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Re: The future of the sailing world. Why are there so few young people cruising??

How did the older cruisers survive AND raise kids aboard?

Where did food come from? Gas? Water? Was cruising cheaper in the past? Did you do day labor or have jobs lined up when you arrived in a new port? Did you need special visas to work in foreign lands?

I'm interested in the logistics of living on the water. I assume you were able to live on the hook "rent free." Did you older sailors leave land behind with a sack full of cash or earn it as you traveled? If so, what did you do?
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  #517  
Old 03-01-2013
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Re: The future of the sailing world. Why are there so few young people cruising??

Quote:
Originally Posted by c. breeze View Post

"You need to grow up. There'll be time to cruise when you retire"
Reminds of this.

I'm in my twenties and have every intention of trying to do some cruising at this time in my life. I am a Finance Manager at a mid-size company, and have done quite well at it. I've noticed people in my line of work especially (accounting/finanace) feel compelled to work themselves to death 70 hours a week with the hope that there is reward of retiring comfortably at 65 and then enjoying all the hobbies and experiences you dream about now.

Yes, I'm young, so is my girlfreind - 31 years old. She is also just finishing up chemotherapy for Breast Cancer and then radation. Before her diagnoses we had planned to pick-up and spend 6 months - a year living aboard in the Carribbean. We cannot possibly do it as soon as we'd like now, but hopefully 2014. In the meantime we have our 35 footer on Lake Michigan.

We have both recieved a harsh life lesson that we aren't gauranteed a long and healthful life. I have 65 y/o relatives with Parkinsons, cancer, crippled joints, etc... I feel like if I want to do this I should do it soon, because who's to say I'll get a chance to do it in 35 years? Should I turn 65 and find myself still limber and in good health with a comfortable nest egg, and a world to explore that hasn't been destroyed by war, global economic collapse, enviormental destruction or just made irrelevant by the digital world - well, then I'll just consider it bonus time that I get to have an adventure with again.
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  #518  
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Re: The future of the sailing world. Why are there so few young people cruising??

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWollard View Post
How did the older cruisers survive AND raise kids aboard?

Where did food come from? Gas? Water? Was cruising cheaper in the past? Did you do day labor or have jobs lined up when you arrived in a new port? Did you need special visas to work in foreign lands?

I'm interested in the logistics of living on the water. I assume you were able to live on the hook "rent free." Did you older sailors leave land behind with a sack full of cash or earn it as you traveled? If so, what did you do?
Wollard, I'll try and answer your questions as best I can remember. Early 70's for me first time, S. Pacific. I think there was 12 boats that crossed from N. American west coast. Others came through the canal from USA east coast and Europe. A few Europeans came via Cape Hope. Plus there were boats that had been in the S. Pacific for 2 or 3 years.

Kids were home schooled just like to day. In those days the American kids did the Calvert system as it was about the only educational home school program available. Today there are so many great programs and home schooling is so much a common thing now.

We did live on the hook a little more then because there were not as many Marinas. If there had been more marinas cruisers would have used them more. We all looked forward to a marina once in awhile after 2 months on the hook, land food, hot showers and resupply beer.

Food was more dried goods than today, rice, beans canned meat. Ice boxes then and ice lasted about 6 days in the tropics. More food available around the world today, even in isolated islands. All most all fuel came in 55 gallon drums when you could find it. Did not have the great engines like today so one had to be careful with fuel. Passages were less safe because no real weather forecasting and one did not motor through light or no winds. Had a good friend get caught in the famous Fiji cyclone of 72 because he had no way of running away from storm, he made it but never wanted to go through that again.

Cruising I think was about the same cost wise as today when you look at the dollar value now and then. Boats may have cost less to maintain as they were simpler but the gear was not as good as today and broke far more often.

Working in foreign countries was a bit easier except New Zealand. But anyplace was good if you had something they wanted and you could find work. Diesel mechanics did very well, waitresses and waiters did well in bigger places, same today. I picked fruit in New Zealand under the table and in Austraila I actually got payed to play ice hockey for a season and I did some stone work.

We did not have bank or credit cards back then so you had a letter of credit from a major bank and traveler checks. You could only cash in at a bank. Most sailors had money hidden somewhere on board nothing changes there.

Sailing was great then and still is just as good today but it was a bit different. I enjoy today because of great navigation products of today and instant weather you can go to so many more places now. By the way I still think the island women are just as beautiful today as they were in the 70's. The most beautiful smiles in the world.

I really think it is the same as you can see from my previous posts that young people have the same chances today as back then. You just have to have the same commitment as we had back then and find the way to break away from the lambs and the wolves.

Good luck to you all.
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Last edited by hannah2; 03-01-2013 at 09:09 PM.
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  #519  
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Then of course reality sets in, and one comes to terms with the fact that there isn't anything at all exceptional about the lack of young people going out on extended sailing ventures. Anymore than there's nothing extraordinary about the lack of Appalachian trail through hikers. The simple fact is that there are many, an always have been, people who enjoy weekends or weeks on the trail- and even significant numbers of stage hikers- however- true through hikers have always been in short supply. The extraordinary thing is that there is anyone at all for whom the desire for discovery and adventure is so strong that nothing else will do but to go forth- at risk of life and limb and grave discomfort and inconvenience in pursuit thereof. The desire to cross oceans has absolutely nothing to do with the desire to sail- they are linked of course, but for that personality the sailing is only a means to an end. The desire to through hike has absolutely nothing to do with the desire to get out and stretch ones legs. There is, in a certain small segment of the population, this form of mental illness that propels an individual far past the commonplace- and the insidious thing is that typically the possessed soul considers itself "free"

Laughable. It's as insatiable a monkey to keep fed as the desire to set thousands o dollars on a table and make it disappear or double with a role of the dice, the need to drink bottomless quAntities of liquor or run drugs into a vein with a needle. And in the end- potentially just as damaging- though not neccssarrilly. Spelling jeez.

But then this is only my perspective - and I do not consider myself a cruiser. There's an obsessiveness to it that the terms "cruiser" or "liveaboard" don't do justice.

I think there is an idyllic reverie that is conjured by the term "cruising" and as such I think it's a lifestyle that attracts a lot of people who are inherently not suited to it. Why aren't there more young people cruising? Why aren't there more people doing it period?

Why would there be- its certainly not all its cracked up to be. Probably the pertinent question would be "why aren't more young people taking there boats out for a week or two at a time?"

And to that I would say- they are, I see I all the time.

To the question about was cruising cheaper back in the day- I don't know but I'm guessing it wasn't all that much cheaper- inflation being what it is. I would also say that if you drink like a fish all you need do is do it at home instead of the bar for 1-2 years and you'll have about 10,000 saved to buy a boat and take off for however long. No rent, no dock fees, all Of a sudden that budget goes pretty far. And of course isn't everyone a freelance photographer nowadays? I mean that accessibility provided by digital photography has changed the game for everyone. And all this time spent online has to be good for something too-like practicing writing something other than LOL Smiley smiley LMFAO. So then- by default we are freelance writers as well. Though apparently of shabby enough nature that we have to puke it out for free. Sometimes.
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  #520  
Old 03-02-2013
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Re: The future of the sailing world. Why are there so few young people cruising??

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Originally Posted by c. breeze View Post
The desire to cross oceans has absolutely nothing to do with the desire to sail- they are linked of course, but for that personality the sailing is only a means to an end.
So few people understand this.
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