nautical language rant - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree63Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 07-17-2012
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 107 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Re: nautical language rant

What about "Rubber Bumper Thingies"? That's nautical, right? Captain Ron said it!!

As far as spelling, when I write books or articles, etc - my spelling and use of the fine english language is right on. But on Sailnet which is a forum, I just try to get the basics across. I personally couldn't care less if it was spelled correctly. As long as you can understand what is being relayed, that is all that matters in my opinion. And I get too busy here to go back and make sure every thread is grammatically correct.

THere is a book (we have it) called the Nautical Dictionary. Really cool, honestly. In addition to having every nautical word known to man, it also has their history and where they were derived from.

For example, where did the words Port and Starboard come from and what was their significance? WHat about halyard? What about sheet? And as a little side note, before any of us get too stuck on the proper spelling of these words, you might be surprised to learn that many of these words have changed spelling over time! Our proper spelling of some would be considered misspelled by the sailors of old (assuming they could spell at all). Is halyard spelled Halyard? Or is it Halliard? Or wait... is it Haul Yard.... or is it Haul a Yard...

Brian
__________________
Sailnet Moderator



1987 Tayana Vancouver 42, Credendo Vides, (Mom and Pops boat, F/T Mobile Live Aboards in Puget Sound)

My Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow My Blog at:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow me on Facebook:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 07-17-2012
tommays's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,249
Thanks: 1
Thanked 25 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 7
tommays will become famous soon enough
Re: nautical language rant

Feel free to ignore meaningless stuff that which offends you and your life will have much less stress
ottos likes this.
__________________
1970 Cal 29 Sea Fever

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 07-17-2012
smackdaddy's Avatar
Last Man Standing
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 13,172
Thanks: 85
Thanked 82 Times in 76 Posts
Rep Power: 9
smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough smackdaddy is a jewel in the rough
Re: nautical language rant

Quote:
Originally Posted by SEMIJim View Post
This isn't about grammar Nazism. This is about using effective terms in a specialized setting: Boating. Specifically: Sailing. There's a lot of gear, mechanisms, lines, etc. on a sailboat. When there is more than one individual operating the boat, clear, precise and succinct communication is absolutely necessary.

It could mean the difference, for example, between a successful crash tack and an unfortunate t-boning.

Jim
In a racing context, I totally agree. Outside of that, it tends to be to be way over-hyped.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Dawn Treader - 1989 Hunter Legend 40
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 07-17-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,936
Thanks: 4
Thanked 34 Times in 34 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Tempest is on a distinguished road
Re: nautical language rant

I invite guests on my boat, so that I can enjoy their company, to have a good time and enjoy the day. I have no problem, saying right or left, front or back, rope or kitchen, toilet..etc...They're not sailors and I don't expect them to learn a language, for an occasional outing, that took me years to learn. When I'm with sailors, I speak sailorese.
( did I spell that correctly? ) when with non-sailing friends...I try to be a good host.

I can single-hand my vessel so it's not much of an issue. If someone wants to learn I'll teach em. If they don't, I'll speak a language they understand.

In my opinion, the most valuable person on my boat is the person who can hold a course.
My 12 year old niece can hold a compass course better than most people, I've taught.
And better than my auto-pilot. That frees me up to do everything else...no special language is needed for her to steer in open water.
MedSailor, SloopJonB and groggy like this.
__________________
Tempest
Sabre 34
Morgan, NJ
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 07-17-2012
MedSailor's Avatar
Closet Powerboater
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Anacortes PNW
Posts: 2,562
Thanks: 82
Thanked 54 Times in 46 Posts
Rep Power: 7
MedSailor is on a distinguished road
Re: nautical language rant

I actually think it's a good idea to use all the nautical terms. In the beginning I used them because it was fun, but now I realize that they have real utility because of their precision. It's exactly the same in medicine, the terms are many and complex but the precision is useful.

"I'm looking at a rash that is 6cm by 4cm located at the right mid-clavicular line at about the level of the 7th rib and is non-confluent mixed erythematous macular and vesicular lesions with clear fluid in the vesicles on a base of normal appearing skin." Sounds like gibberish but it's as good as a photograph over the phone!

Same thing with the lines, using the correct term in a SNAFU can make all the difference.

The only problem with teaching my wife all the terms, is that I now have to watch my usage really carefully. If I say, "Lets hang a flag halyard from the stay." I might get a response like, "Ummm.... isn't that a shroud?" I guess that's what I get for "teaching" my wife (who speaks 7 languages and has an applied linguistics master's degree) the nautical language.

MedSailor

JSnaulty I've been on a mission to find the longest word in medicine. Ever come across one longer than Esophagogastroduodenoscopy? I find it funny that EGD is precise but has only one fewer syllable than "Stick a camera down the throat and look in the stomach".
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


I have a sauna on my boat, therefore I win.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 07-17-2012
itsaboat's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 235
Thanks: 5
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 3
itsaboat is on a distinguished road
Re: nautical language rant

Great post. It's not boat snobbery or being too precise. Just as in any field or activity, knowing what to call a thing is important for communication. We start learning at an early age to start asking for a cookie instead of pointing at it. Denny's menus notwithstanding.

Just as in any activity or field, terminology is important. In my field of science/medicine the terminology is much more of a hurdle than learning the parts of a boat, but no less potentially life threatening in certain situations. Knowing your H2O from H2O2 is a simplistic example. It is a balance, not a scale. They are shrouds not mast wires. Hemostats not tweezers. Port not left. Correct use of language is how we clearly and concisely convey ideas and results. I am sure you could apply similar examples from accounting or electrical professions. It just matters.

I am newish to sailing, and try hard to use correct terminology. I find that teaching others on my boat is one of the best ways for me to learn. I don't make a big deal of making the passengers on my boat use the terms, I just start talking and pointing and let them make their own translations. If they want to participate they will learn, if they want to sit in the cockpit the whole time they won't. I have found it is more fun to sail with those that do want to learn and they get invited back more often than those that don't.

As far as spelling goes on the forums, I give partial credit. It is the internet after all. We are typing these posts with our thumbs on our phones, in between calls at work, and other distracting situations into a tiny box in the middle of a screen. Mistakes happen.

One last thing: I think the "leward" pronunciation of "leeward" is archaic and unnecessarily confusing.
__________________
Pearson 27
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 07-17-2012
itsaboat's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 235
Thanks: 5
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 3
itsaboat is on a distinguished road
Re: nautical language rant

Quote:
Originally Posted by MedSailor View Post
It's exactly the same in medicine, the terms are many and complex but the precision is useful.
You beat me to it, Med. I started typing my post and went to grab some lunch, finished it and there you were. Good point.
__________________
Pearson 27
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 07-17-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,077
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
sawingknots is on a distinguished road
Re: nautical language rant

you mean "that thingy" won't work? some people are just too serious,if you went back to the 18th century would any of us understand the lingo?
HDChopper likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 07-17-2012
SlowButSteady's Avatar
Senior Slacker
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,223
Thanks: 0
Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
Rep Power: 5
SlowButSteady is on a distinguished road
Re: nautical language rant

SBS eats, shoots, and leaves.
copacabana likes this.
__________________
Never forget them. Do something to prevent it from happening again.
Charlotte Bacon, Daniel Barden, Rachel Davino, Olivia Josephine Gay, Ana M. Marquez-Greene, Dylan Hockley, Dawn Hochsprung, Madeleine F. Hsu, Catherine V. Hubbard, Chase Kowalski, Jesse Lewis, James Mattioli , Grace McDonnell, Anne Marie Murphy, Emilie Parker, Jack Pinto, Noah Pozner, Caroline Previdi, Jessica Rekos, Avielle Richman, Lauren Rousseau, Mary Sherlach, Victoria Soto, Benjamin Wheeler, Allison N. Wyatt
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 07-17-2012
smurphny's Avatar
Over Hill Sailing Club
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Adirondacks NY
Posts: 2,853
Thanks: 55
Thanked 63 Times in 61 Posts
Rep Power: 6
smurphny is on a distinguished road
Re: nautical language rant

Using perfect grammar and proofreading everything on a forum board like this is not the objective of most people. While correct spelling and grammar should always be a goal, they are MUCH more difficult for some than for others. IMO, good/bad spelling is genetic and has little to do with "intelligence." I would like to be able to comment on blatant, third grade misuse of grammar for the benefit of the poster who uses something like "irregardless" but do not because I don't want to embarrass anyone. (I once had a principal who used this word on a regular basis as the staff rolled their eyes and never let on. I made sure, on an observation day, that the lesson was about the word "irregardless.":-)

As far as sailing terminology goes, as in any endeavor, knowing the lingo is essential, period. Not only that, but if you want to appear to be competent to others in any field, mastery of the language needs to be at the top of your priorities. A mathematician may be a lousy grammarian but he/she better know the language of integral calculus.
__________________
Alberg 35: With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply

Tags
nautical language , terminology , yelling


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sailing command language DirkJ Seamanship & Navigation 31 08-28-2010 11:04 AM
Just a rant, nothing more Bilgewater General Discussion (sailing related) 15 07-08-2010 12:22 PM
Boatbuilder Language Lancer28 Sailboat Design and Construction 7 11-05-2007 04:52 PM
Language on greek islands tugboat1 Chartering 2 05-16-2004 05:18 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:12 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.