Have you ever hit a shipping container? - Page 9 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree46Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #81  
Old 11-08-2012
Philzy3985's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Redondo Beach
Posts: 187
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 3
Philzy3985 is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

Heard a story of sailors that hit one off the coast of southern CA. It was floating with the top just below the surface of the water. On a calm enough sea, it didn't cause boils on the surface or any texture to look odd or stand out. They apparently hit it with a monohull, keelboat. Stopped dead, motored back and had the keel repaired.

I think I read somewhere that a 20' catamaran was screaming across to one of the channel islands and hit "something" that dissapeared right afterwards. It crushed the daggerboard on the leeward side and really damaged the hull. They suspected it was too hard to have been a whale, and assumed it must have been a container, but didn't see it.

My own dad claims to have hit one that sunk and was in shallow enough water that the bottom of the keel hit the top of the container, again stopped and the boat rounded up to the wind. Twisted a huge chunk of the keel, but it was repaired in a few days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #82  
Old 11-08-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Liberty Landing
Posts: 668
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 4
peterchech is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

I heard this is a huge issue now after Sandy...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #83  
Old 11-08-2012
MedSailor's Avatar
Closet Powerboater
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Anacortes PNW
Posts: 3,312
Thanks: 201
Thanked 99 Times in 89 Posts
Rep Power: 8
MedSailor is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
I know, and my wife is like, "What's all this metal boat stuff you're talking about lately?" we already have a sail boat and 40 foot dive boat that keep us broke, Plus our skiff's and dingy's, kayaks. I'll get her to come around. Or, when we sell the dive boat, I'll just do it. This shipping container stuff might be the the nail.
If your wife needs to be talked into a steel boat, you can show her this photo that I like to call "bow bulb vs steel boat":


A couple years I was working with an ER doctor who mentioned that he abandoned ship into his liferaft after sinking 2 days east of Hawaii. I got up at 4:00am and brought him coffee at the end of his shift so I could hear his story.

Long, very good story made short; he had a well-found STEEL hulled boat and struck "something" in the night and began rapidly flooding. He also had an engine driven dewatering pump (not just a "T-fitting" on the impeller) and several electric bilge pumps. Dispite all that he sunk after an hour or more of trying to stay afloat.

Even with a steel boat and an engine driven bilge pump the sea can still get you..... He never saw what he hit but figured it had to be a container.

MedSailor
__________________
I have a sauna on my boat, therefore I win.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #84  
Old 11-09-2012
deltaten's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Lancaster Co. PA/ North East, MD
Posts: 770
Thanks: 7
Thanked 19 Times in 19 Posts
Rep Power: 3
deltaten is on a distinguished road
Send a message via Yahoo to deltaten
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

Mebbe I oughta build a boat outta a CONEX? It'd sail like a stone; but would hold up well to boat strikes :bites tongue: Would also decrease the odds of hitting a CONEX by orders of magnitude

Stumps, logs and debris scare the bejeezus outta me. Alla the crap floating down the local rivers and creeks ends up in the Bay , if not snagged along the way. Perhaps stock and emergency patch kit aboard??
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #85  
Old 11-09-2012
MedSailor's Avatar
Closet Powerboater
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Anacortes PNW
Posts: 3,312
Thanks: 201
Thanked 99 Times in 89 Posts
Rep Power: 8
MedSailor is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

I never worry about hitting logs anymore. Not since I fitted this red puppy to my bow. It also seems to frighten off those pesky "stand-on" vessels as well...



MedSailor
justflie likes this.
__________________
I have a sauna on my boat, therefore I win.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #86  
Old 11-09-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 248
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
steel is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimjazzdad View Post
The shipping companies should be required to design shipping containers with hydrostatic flooding valves and enough ballast to ensure they sink promptly, but what is the likelyhood of our miniscule sailing lobby of ever getting that to happen?
Would it be cheaper for the shipping industry to subsidize the cost of metal sailboat hulls to match the price of fiberglass hulls?

Quote:
Ok, say I'm really scared now. Thinking about trading my fiberglass boat for a corton steel boat. Curious how well the steel boat will hold up to corrosion (especially in the bilge area where nooks and cranies will normally have at least some moisture and maybe salt water). What is the life expectancy between glass and steel boats?
I never liked the idea of being in a fiberglass boat out on the ocean. Ideally you want aluminum, but it is expensive.

The life expectancy of a smaller sized steel hulled boat with a length in the 30's is about 20 years in salt water, with an average paint job on the inside. The reason for this is that's about how long the paint on the inside holds up. Since insulation, wooden shelves, and other structures are installed inside the boat blocking access to the inside of the hull, painting the inside is impractical. If I had a steel boat, I would gut the inside until the hull was completely exposed everywhere. I would make shelves out of welded steel and get rid of any insulation. The floor would unbolt and everything would be made to be opened to expose every inch of the hull. Now it's just a matter of going through and spraying paint along all the stringers every few years. Now the boat should last more than 50 years. Welding patches on the outside won't be a problem anymore since I could easily repair the burnt paint on the inside.

The outside is easy to take care of. The electrical cathodic protection of the hull (usually from zincs) prevents rust from forming under water in places where the paint has chipped off. Places above the hull which are exposed can be patched up. Great care must be taken when hauling the boat to ensure the hull is clean and free of barnacles which can ruin the hull if left to sit that way. Steel can be sand blasted and repainted from scratch fairly easily if the equipment is set up. There is no gel coat to worry about.

So, stick with fiberglass and stay near your life raft and near shore, or get an expensive aluminum boat, or get a steel boat that has a high quality paint job on the inside with no spray on insulation, or gut the inside and learn to sail rugged, or get a big steel boat where all the inside objects can be moved around to expose the hull for maintenance.

Quote:
Just last fall, 3 yachts were abandoned between the NE and Bermuda, yet none of them were scuttled by crews who clearly had the means to do so, and fully aware that other sailors would be following in their wake...
But they could leave the anchor light on with their solar power. No need to sink it. If it does sink, it will go down fast since it's not filled with inflatable balls or something. Someone will be happy to find it and claim it. But I do think something needs to be done about people who claim abandoned vessels, salvage anything of value, and then let it loose to end up as a wreck on a shore. I have the same problem with scrap collectors who remove part of the thing that has value and then leave the worthless part in your front yard and the trash truck won't take it, nor will anyone else now.

Last edited by steel; 11-09-2012 at 02:36 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #87  
Old 11-23-2012
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 0
svtrio is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

While motor-sailing 25 miles off the east coast of northern Florida in my 34' Prout Snowgoose catamaran during the 1980s, the outdrive prop struck a drum between the hulls. Weather conditions were cloudy during daylight, and the drum, which apparently was floating just beneath the water, wasn't visible. The prop ripped into the drum and snagged it. Freeing the drum from the propeller was difficult (I was solo). The only damage to the boat was a bent and torn prop.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #88  
Old 11-23-2012
MarkofSeaLife's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,826
Thanks: 41
Thanked 112 Times in 94 Posts
Rep Power: 5
MarkofSeaLife is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

Don't let irrational fear stop you cruising!

Aa3jy's photo is a good one, they do exist. But if they were at all common we would ALL have photos of them. His was taken in 1996 thata 15 years ago!

Most reports are something UNSEEN that goes bump in the night. Vastly more likely to be a current buoy, a oil drum etc.

You will lose your life if you stay on shore.... Your cruisng life. So don't let irrational fear stop you as there are enough real concerns that stop cruisers!

Trees are something that is vastly more likely to bump your boat however most have rotted and a bump not a bang.

So please do not give up your dream of cruising because of Internet crap.


Mark
SVTatia, chef2sail and Brent Swain like this.
__________________
Sea Life
Notes on a Circumnavigation:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #89  
Old 11-23-2012
souljour2000's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 617
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
souljour2000 is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

If you hit a partially-submerged container chances are you've been picked by Lord Neptune for a change of boat and possibly a new incarnation if your at speed when you hit...but such is life...I'd be more worried when I'm driving I-75 than when sailing across a shipping route after a blow....at least the shipping container isn't going 80 mph...
MedSailor likes this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #90  
Old 11-23-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 2,373
Thanks: 19
Thanked 33 Times in 32 Posts
Rep Power: 4
Brent Swain is on a distinguished road
Re: Have you ever hit a shipping container?

Quote:
Originally Posted by steel View Post
Would it be cheaper for the shipping industry to subsidize the cost of metal sailboat hulls to match the price of fiberglass hulls?


I never liked the idea of being in a fiberglass boat out on the ocean. Ideally you want aluminum, but it is expensive.

The life expectancy of a smaller sized steel hulled boat with a length in the 30's is about 20 years in salt water, with an average paint job on the inside. The reason for this is that's about how long the paint on the inside holds up. Since insulation, wooden shelves, and other structures are installed inside the boat blocking access to the inside of the hull, painting the inside is impractical. If I had a steel boat, I would gut the inside until the hull was completely exposed everywhere. I would make shelves out of welded steel and get rid of any insulation. The floor would unbolt and everything would be made to be opened to expose every inch of the hull. Now it's just a matter of going through and spraying paint along all the stringers every few years. Now the boat should last more than 50 years. Welding patches on the outside won't be a problem anymore since I could easily repair the burnt paint on the inside.

The outside is easy to take care of. The electrical cathodic protection of the hull (usually from zincs) prevents rust from forming under water in places where the paint has chipped off. Places above the hull which are exposed can be patched up. Great care must be taken when hauling the boat to ensure the hull is clean and free of barnacles which can ruin the hull if left to sit that way. Steel can be sand blasted and repainted from scratch fairly easily if the equipment is set up. There is no gel coat to worry about.

So, stick with fiberglass and stay near your life raft and near shore, or get an expensive aluminum boat, or get a steel boat that has a high quality paint job on the inside with no spray on insulation, or gut the inside and learn to sail rugged, or get a big steel boat where all the inside objects can be moved around to expose the hull for maintenance.


But they could leave the anchor light on with their solar power. No need to sink it. If it does sink, it will go down fast since it's not filled with inflatable balls or something. Someone will be happy to find it and claim it. But I do think something needs to be done about people who claim abandoned vessels, salvage anything of value, and then let it loose to end up as a wreck on a shore. I have the same problem with scrap collectors who remove part of the thing that has value and then leave the worthless part in your front yard and the trash truck won't take it, nor will anyone else now.
Man,what a crock!
My steel boat is 28 years old,and as good as the day I launched her. Where I have cut steel out, the epoxy and steel under it has always been as good as the day I launched her. Older one's I've built are in just as good a shape. The reason some rust from the inside out is because many
( Foulkes, Fehr, Amazons ) have zero paint on the inside, but bare foam over only primer, or bare steel. Foam is not protection for steel . Three coats of epoxy tar, on wheelabraded and primed steel will give you no serious corrosion in a lifetime.
Most of the critics of steel are those who have never owned a properly built and painted steel boat , but are just passing on bar room rumour from plastic boat salesmen.

My building methods have reduced the building time of a hull and decks to a tenth of that of more traditional methods, reducing the cost of a new hull and deck to well below the cost of building in fibreglass.
If you tried to live aboard your uninsulated steel boat in winter, it would be coated inside with a layer of ice for weeks on end. When you applied any heat, it would rain harder inside than outside, from condensation, and the only warm place would be within 3 feet of the stove. I've seen people try doing it your way, and the above describes the result.
Best get your advice only from those with experience in what you are planning, not from speculators and armchair experts.
I've lived very comfortably aboard my steel boats for 36 years, mostly in BC, year round.
__________________
Brent Swain, Boat designer, Builder, and author of "Origami Metal Boatbuilding"

Last edited by Brent Swain; 11-23-2012 at 05:44 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Container Boat- Far Harbor 39 camaraderie General Discussion (sailing related) 28 01-14-2009 12:12 PM
transporting a sailboat via container ship faithab Boat Review and Purchase Forum 11 05-06-2008 08:43 PM
Shipping by Container flicker General Discussion (sailing related) 19 06-20-2007 06:09 PM
Rogue Container Money $$$ ? Anyone? Kacper General Discussion (sailing related) 23 02-06-2007 10:25 AM
This sailboat fits in a shipping container - Megayacht & Superyacht News NewsReader News Feeds 1 09-21-2006 12:54 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:37 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.