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  #101  
Old 09-24-2012
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
ok ok , I get it, I had 26,000 blue water miles by the Time I was 19 and stopped counting 20 years ago. I know you are a world class sailor, but us solo guy's need to defend our right to do it regardless of that blasted colregs book for not giving us an option to sleep. All we need is a pargraph, saying hove to in certain situation we can rest. underway but not making way with a strobe or something, what ever. ccriders idea is good. It's kind of lying about your staus, but I only lie about really important stuff, and staying alive is in that catagory.
Sorry, but I think the use of a strobe for anything less than an emergency/distress situation is a very poor practice, and if memory serves, is expressly prohibited by Colregs for anything less... What would your reaction be to seeing a strobe from the wheelhouse of your tug? Your first thought would be a distress situation, no?

If you're hove-to and simply want to make yourself as visible as possible, spreader lights are the best supplement to your nav lights, IMHO...
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Last edited by JonEisberg; 09-24-2012 at 04:30 PM.
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  #102  
Old 09-24-2012
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

Aaron and cc

Here is a link to the IMO Colregs site. IMO | COLREG

Here is a link to USCG IMO page - USCG: IMO Homepage

Go for it.
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  #103  
Old 09-24-2012
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

I have singlehanded across the Pacific 9 times, and have very rarely seen another boat out there. I have singlehanded from BC to New Zealand, then on to New Caledonia, Vanuatu and Fiji, and seen only two other vessels in open ocean the whole way. You have almost better odds of being hit by an asteroid, than colliding with another vessel in the mid South Pacific. Life on shore is infinitely more dangerous, than sleeping a full night underway at sea, especially for those who drive a lot, or pedestrians in a big city. AIS has drastically reduced the risk, even further.
Moitesier once posted in Yachting magazine, a picture of a sisteship to his 40 ft Joshua, 5mm plate, which had been T-Boned amidships by a 35,000 ton freighter. You could see the imprint of the ship's bow in the hull, but the boat was not leaking a drop of water. I later heard she sailed to Tahiti, repair was too expensive there, so she sailed on to New Zealand, before any attempt at repairs was done.
One of my 36 footers survived a collision with a freighter in Gibralter, with minimal damage, and nothing serious.A good steel hull will likely survive most collisions with ships, or any other floating debris. I have often T-boned long booms made of three ft diameter logs, at hull speed, with zero risk of damage. It's the easiest way to tie up to them.

Sleep deprivation is far more dangerous. Many single handers I have met sleep up to 12 hours in a stretch, and dont worry about it.
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  #104  
Old 09-24-2012
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
Sorry, but I think the use of a strobe for anything less than an emergency/distress situation is a very poor practice, and if memory serves, is expressly prohibited by Colregs for anything less... What would your reaction be to seeing a strobe from the wheelhouse of your tug? Your first thought would be a distress situation, no?
Yep - Rules 36 and 37

Quote:
Rule 36 - Signals to Attract Attention

If necessary to attract the attention of another vessel, any vessel may make light or sound signals that cannot be mistaken for any signal authorized elsewhere in these Rules, or may direct the beam of her searchlight in the direction of the danger, in such a way as not to embarrass any vessel. Any light to attract the attention of another vessel shall be such that it cannot be mistaken for any aid to navigation. For the purpose of this Rule the use of high intensity intermittent or revolving lights, such as strobe lights, shall be avoided.
US Inland Rule 37 allows for strobe to be used as distress.
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  #105  
Old 09-24-2012
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
Sorry, but I think the use of a strobe for anything less than an emergency/distress situation is a very poor practice, and if memory serves, is expressly prohibited by Colregs for anything less... What would your reaction be to seeing a strobe from the wheelhouse of your tug? Your first thought would be a distress situation, no?

If you're hove-to and simply want to make yourself as visible as possible, spreader lights are the best supplement to your nav lights, IMHO...
Ya, well spreader is what I do, I was just trying to give an example of what colregs might find acceptable, maybe five green over whites with a pink in the middle, I, as I said before, don't really care if they do something or not. I stay visible, I stay safe, and I remain un hit.
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  #106  
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
Aaron and cc

Here is a link to the IMO Colregs site. IMO | COLREG

Here is a link to USCG IMO page - USCG: IMO Homepage

Go for it.
That's cool. But in just 30 seconds I come to rule 5 which would imply that radar equipped ships should be using their radar to aid in their watch keeping since they have such a hard time seeing small sailboats and small sailboats are part of the environment in which they operate.
So that adds one more thing to the list of failures on the part of the steamer in case you referenced. By my count, it is 5-2 for the sailboat.
Where does the argument end? At the end of time. When will the next single hander set out? Probably tomorrow.
What's he going to do when its time to sleep? Sleep. How does he handle that need? As I recommended or some other arangement which COLREGS does not address.
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  #107  
Old 09-24-2012
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

Lol Jack, I too, am one of those “yachties” with over 10,000 NM in the log book. Interesting question, why do we “yachties” maintain log books and professional watch officers don’t? I maintain mine so I can prove my bonifides to insurance companies and race committees and such. I guess the “pros” don’t have to do that. Kind of gives you pause…

Sadly, dealing with insurance is a fact of life for this “yachtie”. Perhaps I don’t run in the right circles but pretty much everyone I know who has a boat worth north of $100k has insurance. Maybe I need to hang out more with the likes of Larry or Phillipe Kahn more, but I suspect that they insure their million dollar toys too. Hey, if you can walk away from your boat and responsibilities in an accident, by all means go bare. But I for one, maintain insurance.

Back when I was younger, I could go without sleep for long periods. After I hit 40 not so much. Heck, I’m embarrassed to say this, but I’ve actually fallen asleep while helming and that was on a boat with no autohelm or self steering! The good news is I rarely singlehand anymore, because unlike some folks, fellow sailors actually want to ship with me. I am happy to share the experience of off shore sailing with my fellow mariners.
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  #108  
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

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Originally Posted by GeorgeB View Post
Lol Jack, I too, am one of those “yachties” with over 10,000 NM in the log book. Interesting question, why do we “yachties” maintain log books and professional watch officers don’t? I maintain mine so I can prove my bonifides to insurance companies and race committees and such. I guess the “pros” don’t have to do that. Kind of gives you pause…

Sadly, dealing with insurance is a fact of life for this “yachtie”. Perhaps I don’t run in the right circles but pretty much everyone I know who has a boat worth north of $100k has insurance. Maybe I need to hang out more with the likes of Larry or Phillipe Kahn more, but I suspect that they insure their million dollar toys too. Hey, if you can walk away from your boat and responsibilities in an accident, by all means go bare. But I for one, maintain insurance.

Back when I was younger, I could go without sleep for long periods. After I hit 40 not so much. Heck, I’m embarrassed to say this, but I’ve actually fallen asleep while helming and that was on a boat with no autohelm or self steering! The good news is I rarely singlehand anymore, because unlike some folks, fellow sailors actually want to ship with me. I am happy to share the experience of off shore sailing with my fellow mariners.
Well it's because us "pro's" count our time in day's and are issued sea service letters by our employer that are sent to the coast guard for our up grades and renewals. I have several thousand day's of commercial service, one day counting as a day and a half for us or 12 hours as opposed to the usual 8.I keep a log on my little sailboat and if I wanted to I could go back and count the miles. I keep a log on the dive boat and I count the engine hours and bla bla bla. we don't single hand because no one want's to sail with us Goerge, we do it because we like our own company for a spell. My 150,000 dollar dive boat has insurance, my Inherited 28' foot sloop has my skill of keeping it afloat and out of harms way as insurance. Thank goodness they make 100,000 dollar gadget boats and have a book of regulations for you yachtsman to refer to. The ocean is, as you know, a big and wonderfull place, and with the invention of all these gadgets and oppulant boats, you country club boy's can now to get out to sea and enjoy each others company in the comfortable glow of a computer screen and digital decimal device to tell which way the wind is blow'n, where you are and how to get home. " Last one to the pool bar is spoiled caviar" smashing indeed.
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Last edited by Capt.aaron; 09-24-2012 at 09:07 PM.
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  #109  
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

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Originally Posted by Capt.aaron View Post
.....you country club boy's can now to get out to sea and enjoy each others company in the comfortable glow of a computer screen and digital decimal device to tell which way the wind is blow'n, where you are and how to get home.
Be careful Capt. It takes all kinds. I know plenty of yacht club types that are among the most accomplished blue water sailors in the world and I know some motor-less, electronic-less sailors that are little more than homeless asocial neanderthals, with or without a master license.

Let's assume not all meet the stereotypes.
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  #110  
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Re: Is sleeping OK?

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Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Be careful Capt. It takes all kinds. I know plenty of yacht club types that are among the most accomplished blue water sailors in the world and I know some motor-less, electronic-less sailors that are little more than homeless asocial neanderthals, with or without a master license.

Let's assume not all meet the stereotypes.
I know, I know, Thurston, I mean Goerge has a way of living up to the sterotype. Of course the oppulance of the yacht and the expensive gear in a lot of the cases is key to their accomplishment's no? And I know some yacht clubbers who are not much more than neanderthals in a fleece vest and a Ted Copple hair cut. I have freinds on both sides of the tracks and move between the worlds comfortably.
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