SailNet Community

SailNet Community (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/)
-   General Discussion (sailing related) (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/)
-   -   Frameless steel construction (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/92333-frameless-steel-construction.html)

PeterSailer 09-21-2012 03:37 PM

Frameless steel construction
 
What do you guys think about Frameless steel construction or also commonly called origamie construction. I actually bought the plans for a Brent boat, wich is a frameless 36 footer =D

I'm in the military and being deployed in about a week so I won't be able to start building ot now, but as soon as I get back and get my self a house, I'll start welding bits and pieces :)

Any advice from you guys that built their own boats?

Don't bother telling me that steel will rust, or that it's heavy or slow...I know and thats the hole point :)

tommays 09-21-2012 03:53 PM

Re: Frameless steel construction
 
I am pretty good metal worker and i like how Brent has done it BUT it is still gonna take a REAL LONG TIME

PeterSailer 09-21-2012 04:35 PM

Re: Frameless steel construction
 
Well, I plan on start sailing it as soon as I can, so as soon as the rig is made up and the motor is in...I won't wait until the interior is done, thats for sure. I don't plan on being too fussy on it, she will have the "work" boat look and not the all shiny one.

I'm the kind of guy that likes functionality over esthetics...

But yes, I know that I'll be quite long but hey, i'm still young.

I always enjoyed working on boats so the builing process it self should be fun, I'll start by doing all the detailing first( cleats, bollard, bow roller, anchor winch, tangs, and so on...)as a hobby, then when I'll start the hull (and the hull it self shouldn't take to long) I'll only have to weld all the detailing in place...

I'm not really committed to the built yet, I only invested in the plans for now, wich were cheap, so I could always change my mind....If the used brent boat were not that expensive, I would probably buy one instead but...

On the other hand, I really like the idea to build it my self so the bunks would be long enough, I'm 6'6" :)

Pierre

TQA 09-21-2012 07:25 PM

Re: Frameless steel construction
 
Good web site here on a steel boat build conventional not origami CLICKY

Capt.aaron 09-21-2012 07:52 PM

Re: Frameless steel construction
 
Looking forward to reading your posts, I must have one within the next ten years. I haven't read his book yet but isn't it suposed to go together quickly once you start? Please keep us informed on your progress, I'll try and learn from your trials an tribulations, I guess I should learn to weld first!

GaryHLucas 09-21-2012 08:49 PM

Frameless steel construction
 
I've actually gone for a sail on a 36' Brent boat, and bought the plans for the 31'. I must tell you I was really impressed with how it sailed. It was faster than i expected, and tracked like it was on rails. The boats have a single chine that is slightly below the water line at rest. The boats hull is extremely fair,without any filler because the assembly method forces the flat sheet to have compound curvature. The build time for the hull is greatly reduced from other methods, weeks instead of years. However building a boat is a lot like building a house. The shell goes really quick, then all the interior detail takes much longer than you expect.

Beth Leonard & Evans Starzinger built an aluminum 47' boat. They had a yard weld up the hull, and while that was going on they built the entire interior in modules that fit through the main hatch. They built them one at time, in their apartment!

GaryHLucas 09-21-2012 10:21 PM

Re: Frameless steel construction
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by TQA (Post 925137)
Good web site here on a steel boat build conventional not origami CLICKY

WOW! At around 200 days he is still welding! My first exposure to Brent's method was a series of photos showing a Brent boat being built in a cow pasture along a road. It was about 20 photos, starting with the steel sheets on the ground, ending with hull, deck, coach roof, and keel all welded up in about 30 days time.

Gary H. Lucas

PeterSailer 09-21-2012 10:48 PM

Re: Frameless steel construction
 
Quote:

Looking forward to reading your posts, I must have one within the next ten years. I haven't read his book yet but isn't it suposed to go together quickly once you start? Please keep us informed on your progress, I'll try and learn from your trials an tribulations, I guess I should learn to weld first!
You can be sure that when I'll start building I'll take pictures and videos and probably post them on the Origamie Forum that you can find here :origamiboats : Frameless steel and aluminum yachts

Quote:

I've actually gone for a sail on a 36' Brent boat, and bought the plans for the 31'. I must tell you I was really impressed with how it sailed. It was faster than i expected, and tracked like it was on rails.
It's not the first time I hear such comments on the Brent Swain 36 footer, they are very well balanced sailboat.



Like I said, I'm being deployed in about 1.5 week for 6 months and after that I'll take a year long cours on ACS (air craft structure techicien). Only after this cours that I will be able to buy my self a house and start to build bits and pieces.

I have been looking all over the web, marinas and yards, for about 7 years to find the "perfect' sailboat for me and in my book, it's the BrentSwain36. Since I saw this boat I have completely fallen in love with it...

His book is a really good, I have read it at least 3 times, there is a lot of technical drawing for windvane self steering to Roller furling to bilge pump to water maker...and so on. It also explains how to "pull" one of he's hull together and he gives all kind of good tips.

There is Also a DVD that you can buy from Alex, here is he's web site :Home - Origamiboats: The Art of Frameless Steel Boatbuilding

The DVD show the construction of a Brent Swain 36 hull, keels, skeg, rudder, and deck. Here again they show all kind of good tips and tricks to pull the hull together.

And yes, these boats are supose to come together way faster then a framed sailboat but I understand that the interior will still take a while... Thats why im not gonna wait on it to start using the boat.

Cheers

Pierre

SloopJonB 09-21-2012 11:04 PM

Re: Frameless steel construction
 
I've built and I've restored boats. I would STRONGLY recommend you buy something close to what you want and modify it to suit rather than starting from scratch.

Until you've done it you really can't comprehend how much work building a boat is. The rule of thumb is 800 hours per ton of displacement. There are 1950 hours in a work year so do the math. That's for pro builders by the way, not amateurs or inexperienced people.

There are so many different designs afloat out there that there has to be something close to your ideal - pick one up in this ultra cheap buyers market and customize it - you'll save years AND dollars - trust me on this, boats cost MORE to build than to buy, not less.

PeterSailer 09-22-2012 12:03 AM

Re: Frameless steel construction
 
Are you familiar with the frameless methode? It really is faster then framed sailboat but yes I know that it's quite long... but thrust me, there is no other sailboats that are even close to be like the BrentSwain in my eyes...Just the fact that the hull is made out of 3/16 instead of 1/8 is a big plus...and the lines, and the slick looking pilot house, and that simple vane on the transom, and the solid life line, and the cockpit.......Clearly this is the one.

Cheers

Pierre


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:49 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012