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  #71  
Old 11-07-2012
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Re: Lesson from Sandy

Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieMor View Post
After countless tests in my own lab, I have come to the conclusion your statement is a proven fact.
Once you buy a boat you won't need that lab anymore.
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  #72  
Old 11-07-2012
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Re: Lesson from Sandy

In this thread I have read, that if the wind get to strong, you are not able to adjust the lines anymore. I would sugest to those who have that problem to learn how to belay a cleat properly. I have seen it here in the marina when I did my rounds on the dock that a lot of folks would not be able to unship a line on a cleat under strong tension because of the way they belay it so I retied a heck of a lot of lines during that storm to be able to adjust them under strain.
The way to do that is pretty easy.
One turn round the base of the cleat, two cross overs and then a half hitch is all you need. The outgoing end of line should pull inwards on the cleat. That way you can unship the line as far as you need to if you want to be able to hold the strain of the boat pulling into it and you can pay out as much or little as you want with just two fingers.

ATB

Michael
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  #73  
Old 11-08-2012
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Re: Lesson from Sandy

Of course, it is always possible to release a line. The dilemma, when your boat is straining against lines is not whether you can release the line, it's whether you want to risk the result of losing control. As they say s&*t happens. If the line is in immediate danger of chafing through or a rising tide is making it too tight, you may have little choice. If at a dock, it's no big deal. Just back up lines so you can cut one if need be. If the situation is a 60+ mph wind that can sweep you off the deck, boat bucking around, spray blinding you (ski goggles are good to have) and wind taking your breath away and you need to crawl up to the bow, screwing with tethers and then try to ease the EXTREME (3000#+) load on an anchor/sea anchor line with the outcome of losing it a very dire one, well, I'd say make sure you put your chafe gear on right and get lines adjusted before being forced into this precarious position. There are times when you don't just casually go out and adjust lines.
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Last edited by smurphny; 11-08-2012 at 08:10 AM. Reason: grammar
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  #74  
Old 11-08-2012
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Re: Lesson from Sandy

Its not about releasing a line. If you belay a cleat properly you have full controll over it, no matter what load is on the other end.
6 Yars as a life boat skipper and rescue diver in the north sea have not completly gone to waste on me when is comes to bad weather working.

ATB

Michael ( the moron )
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  #75  
Old 11-08-2012
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Re: Lesson from Sandy

Just saying that while a cleat or bollard can, of course, be used to belay a line until it rips out , releasing tension on a line under stressful conditions in a storm is a risky business. When you have to take that half hitch out, you need to not screw up if it's holding your primary anchor under stress. The forces at play are enormous. Fingers can get removed. People can get pulled over by being wrapped in a careening line. This has happened to lots of commercial fisherman who KNOW what they're doing. You are obviously capable and experienced. I'm thinking of the average boater who has limited appreciation of the stresses on lines and little experience with lines under a lot of tension. I would venture to say that the overwhelming majority of people should not be encouraged to be on their boat in a storm and those who know how to handle lines and do stay aboard should plan ahead so as to avoid the necessity of performing acts of heroism when the wind is howling. Put the second anchor out before the boat is swinging wildly. Increase scope in anticipation of high wind. Double lines on pilings if a storm is coming. Deploy the sea anchor and get it adjusted before green water is breaking over the bow which is now bucking up and down 15'. Think "what if...."
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  #76  
Old 11-08-2012
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Re: Lesson from Sandy

I don't want to go and tell folks to stay on their boats by default when the weater turns bad. Nor would I tell them to sail the wrong way round over the pond at the wrong time of the year single handed like I did this year. At the end of the day its up to the individual what they think they should do. All I was trying to explain was a simple thing that would make life a lot less dangerous for the times when you get into a sitoation where you need line control and that is how to properly belay a cleat. That way, the chances of keeping your digits where they belong are just a whole lot better.
The principle of the 7 P's still holds up and knowing how to handle lines is one of them.
I was brought up in the fishery from a young age as we had two shrimp trawlers running in our family in the north sea. was born on a small island called Borkum, just of the north west coast of Germany. Worked for many years on those trawlers, 6 years as life boat skipper, 18 years as a diving instruckter with my own dive school in the canary islands and 16 trans ats. One badly cut thumb and two broken ribs is so far all I have paid for that line of life style. Not going to count bruises though These days I wear foulies that are padded with 5mm neoprene when I get knocked about a bit. Part of the 7 P's I guess.

Take care

Michael ( the moron )
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  #77  
Old 11-08-2012
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Re: Lesson from Sandy

I was a bayman/lobsterman/pinhooker for about ten years in my younger days. A friend of mine was lost out in LI Sound. His boat was found circling by his son, a lobsterman also. He most likely went over tangled in a trap line. Never found him. Once you get pulled down by a line of pots, it's pretty much all over. You go down so quick, it's impossible to get back to the surface before running out of air. Commercial fishing is a rough business, more suited to young guys. I don't know too many with all their digits! When I think about people who do not deal with gear every day trying to handle lines under tension it is scary.
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