Hard vs Soft - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 11-19-2012
PAULCR1's Avatar
Grumpy Cat
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Kemah, TX
Posts: 66
Thanks: 3
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 3
PAULCR1 is on a distinguished road
Re: Hard vs Soft

More food for thought. I don't like the thought of rowing. That is like physical labor. I'm old and retired and gave that foolishness up. Seriously though, you all have given us a lot of great input. Thanks.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 11-19-2012
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 69
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
CarolynShearlock is on a distinguished road
Re: Hard vs Soft

Depending on where you'll use it, think about getting in either from the water and plan for it. Especially important if you're going to be snorkeling or diving from it. Different designs of both hard and inflatables have different pros and cons with regard to this, so it's not a clear decision one way or the other.

FWIW, we've used hard on charters, but for our own boat we first had a roll-up inflatable then switched to a RIB. RIB is harder to stow, but the planing ability won out. Would get the RIB all over again.
__________________
Carolyn Shearlock

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 11-19-2012
jackdale's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 8,923
Thanks: 27
Thanked 52 Times in 49 Posts
Rep Power: 6
jackdale will become famous soon enough
Re: Hard vs Soft

Another point in favor of an inflatable. In an MOB situation you can roll the MOB into an inflatable.
__________________
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Offshore Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203, 204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 11-19-2012
wingNwing's Avatar
formerly posting as eryka
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: aboard s/v Cinderella
Posts: 1,123
Thanks: 5
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 7
wingNwing is on a distinguished road
Re: Hard vs Soft

As Carolyn suggested, how will you use it? We were incredibly happy with our Walker Bay, rowing out to the mooring or rowing in the creek our house backed up to -- until we moved aboard full time. Then, the stability and planing ability of the "gray rubber boatie" (as our Bahamian acquaintance called it) won out. 10-ft Brig RIB with 10 hp outboard. Mandatory for cruising where current and distance is an issue. Rowing is fine for lakes, but just won't get you far enough on big water.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Cinderella, CSY 33, Photo by Joe McCary

Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable. - Sidney J. Harris


Shameless self-promotion - my blog for the Annapolis Capital newspaper:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
still has some glitches to be worked out. Until then, I'm posting at:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
and
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
! And a new project:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 11-19-2012
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,180
Thanks: 21
Thanked 96 Times in 80 Posts
Rep Power: 10
PCP will become famous soon enough
Re: Hard vs Soft

Inflatables are not alike. Probably for the OP, one with an hard bottom will tick many cases.

For me, after having researched a lot and having considered as priorities lightness and easy motion trough the water I have chosen these ones:

Plastimo Fun Series Pi320vb for Sale. Row Boat, Dinghy, Tenders - Boat Sales 8217 - Yacht & Boat

http://www.yachtandboat.com.au/uploa...ments/1166.pdf

They are not normal platimo tenders and these ones unfortunately (for me) are expensive.

Their advantages: a 3.2m tender weights 33kg, has a high pressure V bottom (actually the interior bottom is not plane but in V) and I am not talking about the ones that have a normal pressure bottom, this one is really hard and the bottom is made with a heavy plastic material, can handle a 15hp outboard and can carry legally four adults or 736kg. The bottom has flaps to make it easy to plane at speed.

As it is light it also offers less resistance when towed.

And of course, can be folded for the winter and stowed inside the boat.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 11-19-2012
TQA's Avatar
TQA TQA is offline
Bombay Explorer 44
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,618
Thanks: 0
Thanked 50 Times in 46 Posts
Rep Power: 6
TQA is on a distinguished road
Re: Hard vs Soft

In the Caribbean cruising community I would guess there are 20 inflateables for every hard dink. Most of those being RIBs
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 11-19-2012
fallard's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Mystic
Posts: 903
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 5
fallard is on a distinguished road
Re: Hard vs Soft

We've had everything from a plywood pram, fiberglas pram, fiberglas dinghy with stowable sailing gear, roll-up inflatable, and now a hard bottom inflatable. The plywood pram is long gone, but we still have the rest of the fleet.

Here's my take: the hard dinghies are easier to row, but are tippy and can be a problem at a crowded dinghy dock. I've seen then swamped, apparently by thoughtless inflatable folks who weren't careful. You can drag them over shells without concern except for cosmetics. The roll-up was convenient, but a lot of work to stow and reinflate. It was hard to row, especially against the wind and needed the 4 hp motor to deal with currents. We sliced it unexpectedly once and barely got it from the beach to the mother ship in time to remove the motor and dinghy from the water. We subsequently got retractable wheels that were great.

We eventually got a 10.5 ft hard bottom inflatable with a 10 hp engine with a total weight of about 300 lbs. (All of our other dinghies are in the 140 lb or less category.) We are resigned to towing it and dragging it up on the beach or anchoring just off the beach. We put up with the drag because this dinghy is noticeably drier, more stable and can more easily handle extra gear, like folding bikes. With the 10 hp motor it can be a tug for our 35 ft sailboat if needed. To avoid having to use bottom paint, we haul it up on a fixed dock via a small crane when we're in our home port.

If you intend to beach a dinghy where there is some wave action, the inflatables are clearly more suited than hard dinghies, especially when heading back out from the beach. An inflatable is a lot less likely to get swamped and capsize especially when boarding.

Walker Bay has a hard dinghy that can be equipped with an optional flotation ring that might represent a middle ground, but we passed it over as being too small for our needs.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 11-19-2012
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Southern Mississippi
Posts: 33
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Johnnycatt is on a distinguished road
Re: Hard vs Soft

I was considering getting an inexpensive "blow-up" boat to keep as an emergengy dinghy for my first overnight sail... after viewing the price, I decided to just tow my brothers kayak (or let it sit on the bow)...

Not sure if that adds to the argument, but it is my perspective!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 11-19-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,385
Thanks: 1
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 11
capttb is on a distinguished road
After a hard night ashore falling head first into an inflatable hurts less
Johnnycatt likes this.
__________________
"Just call me TB"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 11-20-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Three Mile Harbor, East Hampton, NY
Posts: 463
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 8
tweitz is on a distinguished road
Hard vs Soft

I would add that the stability of an inflatable is a huge plus. Loading or unloading kids or less nimble adults is a lot easier when stepping on the gunwale does not tip the boat.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Soft versus hard shackles Zanshin Gear & Maintenance 12 06-05-2011 03:27 AM
hard dodger vs. soft ktuthill General Discussion (sailing related) 15 10-01-2009 12:31 PM
hard dodger vs soft dodger bluetommy77 Boat Review and Purchase Forum 6 10-07-2007 06:29 PM
hard dodger vs soft heidi-peter Gear & Maintenance 4 02-05-2003 08:02 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:51 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.