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  #1  
Old 11-22-2012
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Thumbs up Winter Heat while at the dock

We have for years used small ceramic, electrical heaters for the few winter weekends we would spend aboard. We only have a 34 foot vessel and it would take 2 or 3 heaters plus a fan to effectively move warmth to the "corners" of our boat.

This past year I purchased a Dyson Hot air multiplier (whatever that is??) to try. Yes, Dyson products are a bit more expensive but with a coupon from Bed Bath and Beyond, it came to acceptable numbers of dollars so I made the purchase.

It is one of those strange ovals on a platform and did not look at all to be of a "nautical" bend but I have to say, Mr. Dyson has a wonderful product. Now instead of 2-3 heaters plus a fan running, we have one device that seems to warm air, move air and circulate air in an extremely effective manner. Even my toes in the V berth get warm. The Hot has a remote control and you can set both the fan component and the temperature setting. The oval can swing in an arc or be positioned in a straight line. The oval never gets hot to the touch and the "fan" is not loud. It will cycle to the temperature setting so may go off and on as needed.

Certainly many boat owners are fortunate to have diesel heaters to warm their vessels in the winter months. I would love to have one of those or would just like to sail South but for the rare night we crawl under our winter cover and want to warm up our little vessel, as long as there is a power outlet, this will seem to be a comfortable solution.

Happy Thanksgiving all!!

Leslie

s/v Tango, CR 34
Lankford Bay Marina
Chester River, MD
wintering over in the water....
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Old 11-22-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

Good to hear the effectiveness, it seems to get decent reviews, unlike many Dyson products. However, the $400 list price can't possibly be discounted enough to be an easy decision.
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Old 11-22-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Good to hear the effectiveness, it seems to get decent reviews, unlike many Dyson products. However, the $400 list price can't possibly be discounted enough to be an easy decision.
I believe Leslie purchased the Dyson product at 'Bed,Bath and Beyond'..which by-the-way is very interesting store to browse..at about 50% of it's list price due to heavy discounts and rebates..

How effective is this heater..? Normally my vessel's interior portion of the mast is cold to touch this time of the year. After about an hour's running the Dyson, my bare feet while propped up against the mast feel pleasantly comfortable.
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Old 11-22-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

Quote:
Originally Posted by kb3pwc View Post
We have for years used small ceramic, electrical heaters for the few winter weekends we would spend aboard. We only have a 34 foot vessel and it would take 2 or 3 heaters plus a fan to effectively move warmth to the "corners" of our boat.

This past year I purchased a Dyson Hot air multiplier (whatever that is??) to try. Yes, Dyson products are a bit more expensive but with a coupon from Bed Bath and Beyond, it came to acceptable numbers of dollars so I made the purchase.

It is one of those strange ovals on a platform and did not look at all to be of a "nautical" bend but I have to say, Mr. Dyson has a wonderful product. Now instead of 2-3 heaters plus a fan running, we have one device that seems to warm air, move air and circulate air in an extremely effective manner. Even my toes in the V berth get warm. The Hot has a remote control and you can set both the fan component and the temperature setting. The oval can swing in an arc or be positioned in a straight line. The oval never gets hot to the touch and the "fan" is not loud. It will cycle to the temperature setting so may go off and on as needed.

Certainly many boat owners are fortunate to have diesel heaters to warm their vessels in the winter months. I would love to have one of those or would just like to sail South but for the rare night we crawl under our winter cover and want to warm up our little vessel, as long as there is a power outlet, this will seem to be a comfortable solution.

Happy Thanksgiving all!!

Leslie

s/v Tango, CR 34
Lankford Bay Marina
Chester River, MD
wintering over in the water....

Folks should be aware that electric heat is 100% efficient so a 1500W electric heater of any type or price is technically putting the SAME BTU's, roughly 5120 BTU's, into the space.

How you circulate the air in the space is a secondary discussion. For $400.00 a basic $16.00 1500W heater and a $45.00 Vornado fan or some 12V fans will do the same thing. Unfortunately with electric heat you can't beat the physics of putting BTU's into a room. Moving the air around is secondary and can be done effectively for a lot less money than $400.00..

Some of the ceramic disc heaters move some decent air, Pelonis being one good brand, and some don't. Some 1500W electric heaters have no fans so are just radiating vs. circulating..

So 1500W is 1500W is 1500W. If you need the air circulated more effectively there are less expensive methods, unless of course you like the look and size of the Dyson..

Working on boats in the winter I have had very good luck supplementing the small fans in the inexpensive heaters with a small table top Vornado fan on low....
dacap06, jimjazzdad and TakeFive like this.
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Last edited by Maine Sail; 11-22-2012 at 11:03 AM.
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Old 11-22-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

Is the Dyson quieter? That would be an advantage. Whether worth the price is another story.
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Old 11-22-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

I've tried several small electric ceramic heaters for heat while dockside on shorepower for 8 years on two different boats and have never been particularly happy with them. They are pretty noisy and like the OP, I have found it difficult to get uniform heat throughout the boat. You seem to roast in some areas and freeze in others, using one unit and I've never wanted to run more than one at a time. The thermostatic controls help, but not much. They are also a potential ignition source and their placement and safety concerns cannot be overlooked.

During my last weekend on the boat in October getting it ready to pull for the winter I discovered a significant fuel system problem that necessitated hours of on and off messing around in the engine compartment with fuel pump, fuel lines, and some inevitable gasoline vapors (Atomic 4 inboard) present. It was COLD, but I didn't want to use the ceramic heater in that environment so I tried something I've wanted to do for some time. I picked up a radiator-like oil-filled electric heater at Wally World for $39.00.

I have one at home and I like it a lot. Always assumed it was too big and clunky to be practical on the boat. It wasn't! It's tall, but it has a small footprint and is on wheels, so it is easy to move around inside the boat. It fits nicely in the head compartment without obstructing the toilet when not in use. I found it slower to heat things up than the ceramic, but much more uniform once things got going and I feel infinitely safer as well as dead quiet. Even better heat uniformity when I fired up my two 12 volt cabin fans on low to move/mix the air around a little.

Looks kind of "classic" also. Wouldn't have worked on my 23 footer, but on the 32 it's awesome. I'm sold . . . no more ceramics for me.

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Old 11-22-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

In the past I've found the most effective electric heat on the boat when working on it is to use 500 watt halogen work lights. Not only do you get heat which you can direct, but also plently of light. Most all of the energy is heat, not light so your getting the same heat with three 500 watt lights as you would with a 1500 watt heater. I suppose if I was sleeping on the boat I might go the heater route rather than using lights but for working on the boat I think halogen lights are the best way to go.
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Old 11-22-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

Mirari:
Clarification: I was living on the boat that weekend while working on the engine (reaching in from inside the cabin with the companionway steps removed). I needed a warm refuge to eat, sleep and work).

Agree: Halogen lights are great for working on specific projects in the cold.
Mobnets
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Old 11-23-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

We have two of these Pelonis fans and they do a great job in the coldest of weather at the dock in heating our cabin

1500-Watt Ceramic Safety Portable Heater-NTK15A at The Home Depot
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Old 11-23-2012
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Re: Winter Heat while at the dock

We have one of those oil-filled things that look like an old-fashioned radiator, have had it since we moved aboard, and it's our basic heat source at dock. On really cold nights/mornings and in the head, we supplement with ceramics. This Dyson looks quite interesting, thanx for pointing it out.

But you're right, the best dockside heat source is a change of latitude.
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