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-   -   "The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay" (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/94406-chainplate-will-buff-out-probably-okay.html)

JulieMor 11-24-2012 12:37 PM

"The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay"
 
I found this while looking for videos on chainplate replacement. The guy was surprised by what he found!

MedSailor 11-24-2012 01:17 PM

Re: "The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay"
 
"I know from experience that it will buff out and will probably be okay."

Niiiiiice..... Why inspect something if you don't know what bad looks like when you find it? Besides, who needs to "buff out" something (a cosmetic fix) that is behind wooden panels anyway?

My chain-plates are all kinds of bad. It's the next big project for my boat. I'm contemplating making a home foundry and casting my own out of bronze....

MedSailor

JulieMor 11-24-2012 02:58 PM

Re: "The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay"
 
As a potential buyer, that was a great lesson.

RichH 11-24-2012 06:17 PM

Re: "The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay"
 
The chainplate knees on Tayana 37s are notorious 'mushroom farms' that hold but never release the moisture ... the constant moisture is what has caused the crevice corrosion on the (probable) 302 Stainless OEM chainplates. There's wood behind all those fiberglass knees, and was used to affect a 'form' over which the knee's fiberglass was layed.

On a Ty37 when you remove the plates if you see 'any' rust blooms emanating from the studs .... and/or seeing such 'rust blooms' on the chainplates themselves - the only remedy is complete and total rebuild of the knees, and serious consideration of new plates. This high suspicion of internal rot should also be held if there are any chainplate studs that have 'rusted off' at the outer surface of the fiberglass knee.

BTW such rotted knees on a Ty37 is not just a 'lack of maintenance' item of routine recaulking the plates' thoughdeck; but, is pretty indicative or high suspicion of a Ty37s teak deck needing removal and the under-deck needing a total re-core -- a backbreaking or 'very costly' job, your choice.

floridajaxsailor 11-24-2012 07:10 PM

.
 
Julie,
chainplate backing w aluminum small plating is on my agenda for next week actually
yet may I digress and say you are captivating when you talk technical speak...
:cool:

souljour2000 11-25-2012 01:05 PM

Re: "The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay"
 
Jesus..! If it wasn't so scary this would be Monty-Python hilarious...the guys slow monotone voice as the almost farcical condition of the chainplate is revealed almost had me ROFL...

mjf55 11-25-2012 03:37 PM

Monotone voice aside, it was very interesting. The question I have is that repair he made, circular plywood plugs in the knee, steel back plates sufficient? Should the plugs have been joined together? Fiberglass laid over the whole knee repair? Aluminum vs steel backing plates? Or am I just overbuilding again ? Thoughts?

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

SloopJonB 11-25-2012 04:05 PM

Re: "The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay"
 
I posted a while back about my chainplate experience - I took the headstay fitting off to polish - it looked fine but wasn't OCD shiny, as I require.:D

After buffing it with a 1/2 horse buffing machine I noticed what looked like a faint hairline scratch across the front surface of the tang portion below the welded portion. You had to catch the light across it just right to even see it. I buffed it some more but it was still there. I held it at both ends and pulled and it slowly bent like taffy until it snapped across that "scratch".

I immediately pulled every chain in the boat and made up new ones which I had electropolished.

Crevice corrosion can be VERY subtle.

Stumble 11-25-2012 05:30 PM

Re: "The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mjf55 (Post 952958)
Monotone voice aside, it was very interesting. The question I have is that repair he made, circular plywood plugs in the knee, steel back plates sufficient? Should the plugs have been joined together? Fiberglass laid over the whole knee repair? Aluminum vs steel backing plates? Or am I just overbuilding again ? Thoughts?

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

Steel+aluminium+stainless+water is pretty much the definition of an electrolysis problem. Wood anywhere near chainplates is equally a bad idea. They get so heavily loaded even fully encapsulated wood will eventually have the sheathing breached, leading to rot.

Add in that chainplates are often out of sight, or difficult to get to, and there is nothing about this repair that is anything other than a problem waiting to happen.

SloopJonB 11-25-2012 07:09 PM

Re: "The chainplate will buff out and probably be okay"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mjf55 (Post 952958)
Monotone voice aside, it was very interesting. The question I have is that repair he made, circular plywood plugs in the knee, steel back plates sufficient? Should the plugs have been joined together? Fiberglass laid over the whole knee repair? Aluminum vs steel backing plates? Or am I just overbuilding again ? Thoughts?

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2

The mild steel backer was LAME - spend the extra $2 and get stainless strap from a scrapyard. Mild steel will ALWAYS rot on a boat - did you catch how it was in the head and the trim cover wasn't going back on?

Throughbolting them through the hull is plenty strong, especially with all that plywood bedded in epoxy as well.

That original installation is one of the worst designs I have ever seen - I mean really, cobbled up T-Bolts set in as studs? :puke I guess glassed in chains might be a little worse but it would be debatable.

I dearly hope the Maestro didn't spec that horrible setup.

IMHO, the only way to have chainplates set up is to have them fully exposed and bolted through a knee or bulkhead.

P.S. The guy doing the video obviously isn't a SailNetter or he would NEVER have said, in all seriousness "That'll buff out". :D


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