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  #11  
Old 12-17-2012
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Re: Failure

Single screw docking:
As a captain, docking (the same direction no matter what the wind or current is doing) a tall ship several times a day while taking passengers on excursions, not every docking is perfect or looks good. Even with 20 to 30 dockings (and undockings if such a term exists) a week they all can't be perfect. But no matter what the wind does or the current you must know how to handle the vessel you are driving and get it done. It's not luck that got those other people through their exam, and if you think it is, then that may be your biggest problem.
I have a feeling that you do not have a basic understanding of the actions of a boat. All boats turn around the center. Unlike a car, where the back follows the front, when the bow goes to starboard, the stern goes to port. In reverse, most boats will walk to port, or sometimes to starboard. You must put the side of the boat to the dock that she backs toward. This can be used to your advantage; if you come up to the finger slightly into the wind and then turn into a nearly parallel position alongside the finger with the bow closer to the dock, you can then give it a short burst of power in reverse, not to stop the boat, but to swing the stern in. Then leave her out of gear and allow her to drift into the finger, because that will be the direction of the momentum. You could even come towards the finger at nearly 90 degrees in strong winds and turn at the last moment using the method above, and have a beautiful, successful docking. Get the boat set up and drifting in the right direction and let it happen. An experienced captain can "horse" a boat into any dock under most conditions, but you should not try to force things, at this point.
It's really hard to explain all this in writing. If you could find even a row boat to practice with, I think you would get the idea pretty quickly. Almost all boats, from a super tanker to a dinghy can be docked in the same way, it's just a matter of degrees. The bigger the vessel, the longer it takes for the vessel to react to your actions and those imposed upon her by current and wind.
Personally, I can't see what you'll gain from the internet research, but I'm one of those who learn from experience, not education, which is why college was such a struggle for me.
I'm not trying to be an ass here and if we were a tad closer to each other, I'd gladly bring you aboard for a free lesson or 2.
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  #12  
Old 12-18-2012
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Re: Failure

Sounds like PPCDL test in Singapore. It very strict criteria but not impossible. So Mudtimud where are you at?
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  #13  
Old 12-18-2012
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Re: Failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by trantor12020 View Post
Sounds like PPCDL test in Singapore. It very strict criteria but not impossible. So Mudtimud where are you at?
Yup, that's right. I took the test at PolyMarina next to RSYC, my next test date is on the 9th February.

I agree with most of you guys who encouraged practice. However, practice don't come cheap either. It costs about 100 USD to book a session on the practice boat per hour. Nonetheless, I've somehow begrudgingly scrapped enough out of the bottom of my savings for a 3 hour practice session the day before the assessment. That was one costly failure.
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Old 12-18-2012
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Re: Failure

Curious. What do you need the license for in Singapore? Does it provide commercial privileges or is it simply required for recreational boating?
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Old 12-18-2012
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Re: Failure

With all due respect, I have a very different opinion of docking. In general, the rules are simple though mastering them takes a while.

I always approach a slip such that's final turn in is with my nose to the wind. This may even require backing down a fairway, past the slip, then going forward. Pulling into a slip and following the wind (unless there is no other choice) is a typical novice mistake.

Second, speed can be your friend. Yeah, if the winds and currents are light, sure... Come in really slow. However, the docking gods always know when I am coming in and make sure the wind or current is blowing me off.

My suggestion is don't be afraid to use that throttle. Don't come in at 8 kts, but if you come in slow you often lose quick reaction time and drift plays against you... Especially your bow which can fall off quickly and acrew up an otherwise good approach.

For years I had a slip that was beam-to with a wicked 2 plus knot current ripping across it. All I had was a couple of feet to play with on my beam. The only way to get in there was with a good head of steam or the current and wind would have you sideways. The trick of course is how much steam. Still, I say don't be afraid of your throttle.

My opinions.

Brian
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  #16  
Old 12-18-2012
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Re: Failure

I googled ppcdl. It looks like you are using a outboard centre console?
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  #17  
Old 12-29-2012
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Re: Failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
Curious. What do you need the license for in Singapore? Does it provide commercial privileges or is it simply required for recreational boating?
Well in Singapore, operating most mechinery requires a license. It is to ensure competency ..... yet right!. This PPCDL for powered boats is akeen to driving license for cars. It is for pleasure craft.
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