Coronado 35 on Ebay - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 04-23-2004
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sailhawk is on a distinguished road
Coronado 35 on Ebay

Great boat Check it out located on Lake Lanier Georgia.
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Old 04-23-2004
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Coronado 35 on Ebay

I guess the first question is what are the Owners offering to pay people to haul that away? Less flipantly these are boats that generally have a negative value, by which I mean that these were poorly constructed boats thirty something years ago and they have had thirty years of use. They are anything but a ''bluewater vessel'' and given the hull to deck joint and poor sailing capabilities would never be a particularly good choice. While the boat is painted up pretty nicely, adding lifelines, decent used sails and hauling the boat to somewhere with enough wind to actually get some sailing in would pretty much exceed the value of the boat.

Jeff


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Old 04-24-2004
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Coronado 35 on Ebay

Ouch, that''s harsh....

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Old 04-26-2004
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eric97217 is on a distinguished road
Coronado 35 on Ebay

I have a Coronado 23 and I love my boat. Yes it is 30 years old and the prior owner took great care of it but it is still a sharp looking boat. I would never take it out in the blue but bang for the buck the Coronado is not a bad boat for a first boat to learn on.
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Old 04-27-2004
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Coronado 35 on Ebay

I agree somewhat. Coronados are by no means blue water vessels, but they do serve a purpose admirably, I think. I started out on an old C25, and I think that this is a good way to go for the purpose of getting out to sail. If these old tubs didn''t exist & the only way to get into sailing was to buy a blue water-capable Tartan, I think a lot of us would still be standing on the dock.

Don
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Old 04-27-2004
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Coronado 35 on Ebay

For the record my criticism applies to the Coronado 35''s and 41''s. The smaller Coronado''s (23 & 25) were much simplier boats, and were adequately engineered for the substantially smaller loads that they experience in normal use. They sail reasonably well and can provide a lot good sailing for the dollar. If you don''t get into one expecting to restore it to ''like new condition, these are good boats to own. Of course, even for most of the smaller Coronado''s, if a prior owner has not addressed the issue, their standing and running rigging is past its safe lifespan and thier galvanized iron keel bolts should be changed.

The 35''s and 41''s were miserable designs from a hydrodynamic standpoint and were poorly engineered and constructed. The costs for putting one of these larger Coronado''s into any kind of decent condition would be quite high compared to the completed value of the boats in question, and that money would be better spent on a boat that would be a better boat to own when the project was completed.

To touch on your point about Tartan''s vs Coronado''s, there is very little difference, if any in cost between a project Tartan 34 and a project Coronado 35 in equally bad condition. There is virtually no difference in the price to fix the two boats up if they are in equal condition.....BUT when you are finished with the project, the Tartan 34 would be a great sailing boat with a decent resale value closer to what you had in it, the Coronado 35 would be neither.

Respectfully,
Jeff
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Old 04-27-2004
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Coronado 35 on Ebay

Replace the old rigging.. I did that. $500 in blocks and new lines and I ran all the lines back to the cockpit and good to go. But if you have to do that once every 30 years, not to bad.
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Old 04-27-2004
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Coronado 35 on Ebay

Does that $500 include wire and terminals, chainplates and turnbuckles for the stays and shrouds? If so that is an excellent deal. Shrouds and stays have a safe useful lifespan of 15 to 25 years depending on how they were constructed, and where and how much a boat was used. Since many, if not most small older boats, are still using their originals, these components generally need to be replaced to prevent the rig coming down, ( which has become an increasing frequent occurance around here as the fleet ages). Chainplates typically have a 25-30 year lifespan (less with aluminum chainplates) and turnbuckles should also be replaced after a similar period. Even on a 25 footer it is not all that hard to spend much more than your $500 budget on the materials alone that are required to replace your standing rigging. So I would say that you got a great deal if you replaced your standing and running rigging plus lead the running rigging aft for only $500.

Regards
Jeff
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Old 12-27-2006
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There is nothing more than 'the will to go'.

What defines a 'Blue water sailer'?
Is it 45 foot on the water line, fridge, freezer, aerogen, latest Sat Nav phone plastic fantastic yacht, or a plywood 18 foot boat built in the 1960's sailed in the 1980's?

What is a blue water sailor?
Is it the knowledgable man sat at the bar with a list of hydrodynamic co-efficients, or the man who just sailed a house brick across the Atlantic?

There is nothing more important than it being 'your life'.
Nothing more important than being 'in your life'.
You either seize opportunity, or you pass it up. Whats worse is passing up opportunity because whats before you doesn't appear to meet the learned opinion of the yacht club bar professional.
The person who says it cannot be done, should not interupt the person who is doing it.

Suggested reading:
http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/Coronado/1
Shows Coronado 35's turning up in Europe - France and Italy.
they got there because someone sailed them there.
[at the time you read this they may have be sold, but then again, more might have turned up]

Real Blue water sailers off the top of my head:
Tristan Jones - Plywood Debutante built 1958 sailed 21,000 miles
Shane Acton http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_Acton Circumnavigation
James Warram Catamarans, many of his coastal 21 Tiki's have circumnavigated. And the list goes on and on.

for my own two cents worth, have met a man who's sailed a Coronado 35 across the Pacific.

Jeff H - Senior Member.
Whole heartedly agree with the cost assessment of re-rigging a boat. It costs what it costs. Shoes on your feet are the same, they cost what they cost, but the experience you can have in them is priceless compared to the cash you pay for them.
However, the real costs of negative value lay not in your boat, but in your life, and it manifests itself to what you didn't do in it.
The saddest outcome of that is to find later in your life that your still hankering after it.

A crass example would be to suppose you waited 20 years and in that time the cost of the boat that is held 'blue water' by those in authority costs $200,000 where as today a blue water sailer would be $100,000. Well there you go, in 20 years you'll still end up with someone knowledgable saying 'Yep, those old boats are 20-30 years old, and by todays hydrostatic ratings, they're a house brick'.
Who noticed that trends once established tend to continue?
A boat thats afloat after 30 years, well doesn't that say something for it?
Will it suddenly realise its 31 years old and sink?
Someone who's still on land after 40 years in the next 20 is still likely to be on land. Unless you do something to break the cycle of always doing what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got.

You can look at Captain Cooks boat, and remind yourself, hydrostatically its a house brick by todays standards, but it took him around the world and it was in his day Hi tech. The sea is the same today as it was then.
What he had was the desire to go.
As long as your boat is seaworthy it doesn't matter what it is.

Did I buy this Ebay Coronado? Good god no, no I didn't.
I bought a different one.
If I had been around when this thread was launched my input would have been more timely. Sorry about that, I was too busy. I was out there doing it on a Coronado 35.

There is no such thing as a blue water sailer.
Only those who go and those who don't.
Its your life. Live it. Be in it. Be in the now.
Money is only ebb and flow. Today is irreplaceable, no money buys it back.
Enjoy.
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Old 12-27-2006
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Nothing wrong with Coronados, I have a 1968 C-25 that has been in my family since 1985. It's still a great boat and doesn't cost an arm and a leg to berth or keep up. It turns on a dime, and gets to hull speed very well. With regular maintenance it's a fairly cheap boat to keep floating. About the keel bolts, don't know what you are talking about. My bilges have dust in them, and the only moisture that touches the bolts is from the sponge to wipe the dust out.
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