Newbe with no experience buys big boat - Page 33 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree272Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #321  
Old 11-10-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 261
Thanks: 4
Thanked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 3
ShoalFinder is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

Glenn, I totally get "resisting the urge" to buy a boat.

I sold mine last spring and I've yet to replace it. On the one hand, every day is like being a kid looking out of the window on a rainy day feeling like I'm in a land-locked cage. On the other hand, every day feels like payday because I think of all the money I didn't spend on my boat today.

It's tough. If a pile of cash fell in my lap unexpectedly I'd probably go into crack-fiend mode and buy the first pretty boat I saw that would leave me enough to moor it somewhere.

I'm with you on the old classic boats. My tastes tend toward boats that look so old-school salty that Popeye would feel proud to show it to Poopdeck Pappy. But brass and teak is a full time job on top of everything else, so reality drives me toward the most vanilla plain bleach bottle I can find. "Maintenance Free" has a beauty all its own. Admittedly, it's an aquired taste. It's only ugly at the dock, right? I can't see the outside when I'm sailing it.

It's every sailor's romantic goal to sail around 5 capes. But there are way more hot chicks splashing around South Florida than Cape Horn. So maybe the boat that is actually fun to use as a party barge is more practical.
davidpm and casioqv like this.

Last edited by ShoalFinder; 11-10-2013 at 08:53 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #322  
Old 11-10-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Marina del Rey, CA
Posts: 104
Thanks: 5
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 2
glenndamato is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

Good to hear, Tim! Hope you like it!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #323  
Old 11-11-2013
casioqv's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Riverside, CA
Posts: 410
Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
casioqv is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoalFinder View Post
On the one hand, every day is like being a kid looking out of the window on a rainy day feeling like I'm in a land-locked cage
I know how you feel, I sold my boat to focus more on other responsibilities but only lasted a month before I made an offer on another one.
ShoalFinder and Sal Paradise like this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #324  
Old 11-11-2013
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 14
Thanks: 2
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Tim Newman is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
And every story I've ever read about multiple people ending up in a liferaft has involved the shock at how small it is.
I can confirm that. I've done a sea survival course, part of which involved 8 grown men having to haul themselves into a life raft, one of those octagonal inflatable ones with the canopy over the top. We have to do this to fly offshore in helicopters, in addition to the submerged capsule escape training.

Anyway, we were in a warm swimming pool (it was in Nigeria) and in the most benign conditions you can imagine, and we were in the liferaft for about 5 mins tops. It was as miserable as sin, there was *no* room whatsoever, and you have to sit with your back to the wall, knees up to your chest, feet in the middle. Even after a few minutes you could feel the cramp starting to set in.

Also...as part of the same training, and again in some other facility induction course, I've had to do the lifeboat drills for getting off an oil and gas facility in one of the orange fibreglass lifeboats. We never actually lowered them, but I've been inside two kinds: the one lowered on davits, and the free-fall kind. When you get inside them, you look at the room available, then the capacity stenciled on the wall outside, then back to the room available, and then back to the stencil. Then you cheerfully ask which wag put a zero on the end of the stencil. Honestly, they are as hot as hell inside even with only 6-7 people in (instead of the capacity of 60). With the sea state and the engine fumes, people would be chucking up everywhere, it must be gopping being in there for real.

The free-fall one was worse...you strap into the seats at a weird angle with your head between the legs of the guy behind you. There is absolutely no room to move, the seats are hard plastic, and it is claustrophobic as hell. I couldn't imagine 60 people cramming in there with the rig exploding behind you...

Anyway, the point: a liferaft is designed to keep you alive, just. By that, I mean blood is pumping through the vital organs and air is getting to the lungs. But that's about it, no more. The things are designed with the assumption that you'll be picked up in a few hours, days at the most. But even a few hours would be the most miserable experience of your life, although you would at least live to tell the tale. I'd avoid having to use one at all costs, really.
davidpm likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #325  
Old 11-12-2013
Sal Paradise's Avatar
Captain Obvious
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: New York
Posts: 712
Thanks: 13
Thanked 21 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 2
Sal Paradise is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

Loved the book. Bought the kindle version. The women were a little scary. My one criticism is you could have treated Megan with more empathy in the book, and in real life. Major kudos for the sail back though. Muy muy macho. You have some guts man.


Glen, are you doing a fitness/weight loss book next?
__________________
Sal Paradise
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #326  
Old 11-21-2013
weinie's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 322
Thanks: 4
Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 7
weinie is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

Glenn,
Thanks for a great read! Just finished the kindle version today.

I didn't read through all the posts here so I'm not sure if this was already covered but...

Peter Gibbons? Didn't he work at Initech with Bob Porter?
And couldn't you work Lumbergh into the story too?

oh and Larry Wilcox?
heheh
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
The Following User Says Thank You to weinie For This Useful Post:
glenndamato (02-10-2014)
  #327  
Old 12-28-2013
catchinrays's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Boyd, TX
Posts: 23
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 0
catchinrays is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

I fall into the "just bought a boat with no experience" category....and I haven't ruled out the sail-up-the-coast-of-Florida-and-sell-the-boat possibility - we hope we go further than that and that we have the fortitude for this to last many years. But we'd rather try it while we can than to spend the rest of our lives with the regret that we didn't try it.

Watch the transformation at Catchin' Rays

Attached Thumbnails
Newbe with no experience buys big boat-catchinrays.jpg  

Last edited by catchinrays; 01-01-2014 at 12:14 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #328  
Old 01-23-2014
GMC GMC is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: CT
Posts: 145
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 5
GMC is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

I was home recently sick in bed and bought the Kindle version of Glenn's book. He is a very good writer and I enjoyed the book for a lot of reasons. Beyond the boat preparation and the sailing, the book made its strongest impression on me with the honest telling of the feelings of the author's experiences of rejection and being ignored. He didn't have to tell the story about when he and his brother were young and he was left out by the neighbor girls who were only interested in his brother, but he did. He talks about the "drive by" rejection that prompted his adventure. He talks about the continued rejection by a potential crew member in another sort of "drive by" incident. He can't find crew in Mexico, etc. This stuff is excruciating to read about, much less experience. I think he wanted to talk about these things as much as about anything else. What this highlights for me is how rejection early and throughout one's life shapes a life and a person's perceptions of the world. You can become a docile, obliging person. You can become a comedian who seeks to laugh away the pain. You can become cynical. You can become homicidal. You can become cruel. You can be a mix of all these things. The instinct of self protection can manifest itself in a lot of ways. Seeing how Glenn copes with this obviously sensitive part of his life was fascinating and as I said, well written. The book will make me more sensitive to individuals who on first impression appear rude or clueless or antagonistic to others. There is usually more going on there and the author proved that. I am sure that he does not want to hear this (but maybe he does in that he told of his pain), but I feel bad for him and I hope he finds a woman to share his life with. I hope that he does not give up. I am optimistic because, had he become too closed off or too angry or too cynical, he would not have ventured out. He seems to be still growing and willing to try, which can't be said of everyone. I am not a psychologist, just relating what struck me about this very interesting "sailing" book.
davidpm likes this.

Last edited by GMC; 01-23-2014 at 04:00 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #329  
Old 02-10-2014
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 37
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
jhaley66 is on a distinguished road
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

I recently read "Breaking Seas" and, coincidentally, faced the same failed impeller problem while on a charter in the Gulf of Thailand in January. The captain of the boat took the fresh water pump and re-routed the sea water lines around the water pump to the fresh water pump. The boat's batteries are just forward of the engine, so he ran the fresh water pump wires right to the batteries. The system worked great for the several hours we needed to motor to get to Salak Paet, Koh Chang for a new impeller.

Being at anchor vs a lee shore made it a much more relaxed exercise!
glenndamato likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #330  
Old 02-10-2014
TakeFive's Avatar
If it's blowin' I'm goin'
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Swarthmore, PA
Posts: 2,446
Thanks: 4
Thanked 41 Times in 39 Posts
Rep Power: 5
TakeFive will become famous soon enough
Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhaley66 View Post
I recently read "Breaking Seas" and, coincidentally, faced the same failed impeller problem while on a charter in the Gulf of Thailand in January. The captain of the boat took the fresh water pump and re-routed the sea water lines around the water pump to the fresh water pump. The boat's batteries are just forward of the engine, so he ran the fresh water pump wires right to the batteries. The system worked great for the several hours we needed to motor to get to Salak Paet, Koh Chang for a new impeller.

Being at anchor vs a lee shore made it a much more relaxed exercise!
Yes, that was a flash of brilliance on his part. Especially noteworthy for an admitted newb with relatively little practical experience. Not sure I would have thought of that.
glenndamato likes this.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Formerly posted as "RhythmDoctor"
1998 Catalina 250WK Take Five (at Anchorage Marina, Essington, on the Delaware River)
1991 15' Trophy (Lake Wallenpaupack)
1985 14' Phantom (Lake Wallenpaupack)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mr. B Buys A Boat- Adventures in Boat Shopping bbremer10 Boat Review and Purchase Forum 85 04-18-2013 12:34 AM
Thomaston boat builder buys foreclosed-on sailboat - Bangor Daily News NewsReader News Feeds 0 08-01-2012 08:40 PM
Newbe SKlem Introduce Yourself 4 09-22-2011 12:43 AM
5hortBu5 Buys a Boat 5hortBu5 General Discussion (sailing related) 4 09-07-2010 10:08 AM
Newbie buys a boat! gar37bic Columbia & Coronado 1 09-23-2007 09:15 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:45 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.