Life Span of a Boat - Page 8 - SailNet Community
 57Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #71 of 103 Old 02-05-2013
Senior Member
 
TomMaine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 472
Thanks: 6
Thanked 26 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Another boat with an unknown lifespan, the Hinckley B40

Either a 100 or 200(I can't recall) were built over a decade or so. 50 years later, they sell for 3 times their original cost if only sparingly maintained. If they're kept under the Hinckley owner "carte blanche" program, they sell for much more.

Part of the allure is status symbol. Yet like the Concordia, I know many that are owned by experienced sailors and the boats are sailed extensively.

They'll never build anymore. They're anachronisms today for sailing performance. But any boat, racer, cruiser, usually the greyhound of it's time when new, is a performance anachronism in a decade, or three, no matter what they are.

It's small too for most of todays 40' boat buyers. Not the best liveaboard. But some people enjoy a simple proper boat for the type of sailing they do.

I suspect that the design will endure(and continue to flourish), because it's a pleasure to own, all around, and very well built. Whether you're under sail or anchored like this in a cove on the coast of Maine, it's a boat that the owner enjoys being on board.
Attached Thumbnails
Hinckley Cabot cove.jpg  
PCP and casey1999 like this.

Tom Young sailing a 1961 38' Alden Challenger, CHRISTMAS out of
Rockport, Maine.
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

'I'd have written a shorter post, but I didn't have the time', Mark Twain.
TomMaine is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #72 of 103 Old 02-05-2013
Senior Member
 
blutoyz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 661
Thanks: 10
Thanked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Rep Power: 3
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

When I started looking last year I was drawn to the late 60 and early 70's boats with the real nice lines so pics like this really make me smile.

I ended up with a 1981 because for a first boat it made more sense to get the most bang for the buck rather than get the one that I fall in love with....LOL
blutoyz is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #73 of 103 Old 02-05-2013 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
casey1999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: HI
Posts: 3,275
Thanks: 18
Thanked 45 Times in 44 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen View Post
you're not being serious as in considering to do something like that are you ?
Sure would consider. Figure all I need to to is remove the lead keel (keel would still be good), could reuse rudder and maybe even the entire deck, or at least the core. For maybe $25,000 in materials and providing my own labor I could have a new boat. Beats buying a new one at $250K and up. But from what others have said, the boat may be good for another two lifetimes, I'll let my greatgrand kids deal with the rebuild. I don't like throwing things away, if they can be reused or rebuilt.
Brent Swain likes this.
casey1999 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #74 of 103 Old 02-05-2013
Senior Moment Member
 
SloopJonB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: West Vancouver B.C.
Posts: 11,356
Thanks: 59
Thanked 67 Times in 64 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by casey1999 View Post
Sure would consider. Figure all I need to to is remove the lead keel (keel would still be good), could reuse rudder and maybe even the entire deck, or at least the core. For maybe $25,000 in materials and providing my own labor I could have a new boat. Beats buying a new one at $250K and up. But from what others have said, the boat may be good for another two lifetimes, I'll let my greatgrand kids deal with the rebuild. I don't like throwing things away, if they can be reused or rebuilt.
The deck core would be the least likely part to still be good.

I, myself, personally intend to continue being outspoken and opinionated, intolerant of all fanatics, fools and ignoramuses, deeply suspicious of all those who have "found the answer" and on my bad days, downright rude.
SloopJonB is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #75 of 103 Old 02-05-2013 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
casey1999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: HI
Posts: 3,275
Thanks: 18
Thanked 45 Times in 44 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by SloopJonB View Post
The deck core would be the least likely part to still be good.
Maybe, maybe not. My current boat is 35 years old and has no core rot. Maintained maybe none in another 35 years.
casey1999 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #76 of 103 Old 02-05-2013 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
casey1999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: HI
Posts: 3,275
Thanks: 18
Thanked 45 Times in 44 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReefMagnet View Post
SmallBoatLover: It's an Albin Vega. Swedish built. The only ones over here have come over on their own hulls. The only other one I know of I last seen in news footage last week floating down a flooded river whilst still attached to it's finger pontoon along with another 3 or 4 boats!



Mackay, Qld, Aus. We get about 6m / 20ft on the biggest springs but the piles need to be higher as well to allow for storm surge in the event of a cyclone. Down south a little ways - maybe 100 nm - the maximum tides are 10m, which are the highest on the east coast of Australia. The Whitsunday islands are about 50nm north of here and the max tides are about 4m.
Not sure if you've seen this:
Solo Around the America's Under Sail | An audacious attempt at sailing the Northwest Passage and circumnavigating entirety of both continents, to benefit Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating

Matt sailed around the Americas (northwest passage and cape horn) single handed and non stop in a Albin Vega 27.
Regards
outbound likes this.
casey1999 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #77 of 103 Old 02-05-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 76
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by casey1999 View Post
Sure would consider. Figure all I need to to is remove the lead keel (keel would still be good), could reuse rudder and maybe even the entire deck, or at least the core. For maybe $25,000 in materials and providing my own labor I could have a new boat. Beats buying a new one at $250K and up. But from what others have said, the boat may be good for another two lifetimes, I'll let my greatgrand kids deal with the rebuild. I don't like throwing things away, if they can be reused or rebuilt.
I dont know if you are talking about one of the special cases like posted here above that is worth 3 times its initial value now (although i doubt that could still be the case with a self rebuilt hull) Else wouldn't it be a lot cheaper to just buy another 30yr old boat, replace the stuff that you have that is better than on the other boat your buying and sell what is left over? Or just buy one of the many boats that has a good hull but nothing else that is good and go from there?

I mean the hull is the one part that usually lasts, so why build a new hull when there are 1000s of project boats on the market where the hull is the only good thing about them?
SloopJonB and Brent Swain like this.
Arjen is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #78 of 103 Old 02-05-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 2,521
Thanks: 20
Thanked 39 Times in 37 Posts
Rep Power: 4
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

Considering that the majority of fibreglass boats spend over 90% of their life at the dock I think flexing is a non issue. Go to the archery club and see how far and the amount of flexing fibreglass bows can take for years , then compare that to the amount a boat gets in a slip at a marina, or at at sea for that matter.
For cruising purposes boat s have gotten progressively worse. Excessive bream has led to righting problems which were a non issue in the narrower ,older designs. Beam much further aft has led to less and less directional stability, in so called"Modern ' designs making it down right foolish to spend the exorbitant prices of newer designs, when older designs are available for far less than the cost of materials, and are far more suitable for cruising purposes.

Brent Swain, Boat designer, Builder, and author of "Origami Metal Boatbuilding"
Brent Swain is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #79 of 103 Old 02-05-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,612
Thanks: 1
Thanked 188 Times in 156 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by casey1999
Sure would consider. Figure all I need to to is remove the lead keel (keel would still be good), could reuse rudder and maybe even the entire deck, or at least the core. For maybe $25,000 in materials and providing my own labor I could have a new boat. Beats buying a new one at $250K and up. But from what others have said, the boat may be good for another two lifetimes, I'll let my greatgrand kids deal with the rebuild. I don't like throwing things away, if they can be reused or rebuilt.
I dont know if you are talking about one of the special cases like posted here above that is worth 3 times its initial value now (although i doubt that could still be the case with a self rebuilt hull) Else wouldn't it be a lot cheaper to just buy another 30yr old boat, replace the stuff that you have that is better than on the other boat your buying and sell what is left over? Or just buy one of the many boats that has a good hull but nothing else that is good and go from there?

I mean the hull is the one part that usually lasts, so why build a new hull when there are 1000s of project boats on the market where the hull is the only good thing about them?
Agreed, that has to be one of the more harebrained ideas I've heard of in quite some time... (grin)

And, a price tag of $25K seems wildly optimistic, to me, and one could easily waste YEARS of potential sailing/cruising time on a project of such magnitude...

Not to mention, would a design whose hull is "shot" at this point in the era of fiberglass boatbuilding even be worth replicating?

When production boatbuilders go bust, one of their most valuable assets to be sold off are their existing molds... To use your boat as a plug, and then go through all the time and expense to create a female mold which would have no value - legally, at any rate - after such a one-off project, well... it's hard to imagine a greater waste of money on the resurrection of an old GRP boat from the dead... More effort and expense might well be expended on the creation of the mold itself, rather than the hull... Doesn't seem to make much sense, especially for someone who "doesn't like throwing things away"...

Here's the mold from which my hull was the very first one to pop out of... A couple of decades ago, after the Allied Boat Company went bust, some dreamer bought the molds... They're still sitting in some field up in the hills outside of Amsterdam, NY...



At least I know where I might find a spare deck, if the need should ever arise... Although, I would hope someone would have the good sense to convince me to just shoot myself, instead... (grin)

casey1999 likes this.

Last edited by JonEisberg; 02-05-2013 at 06:23 PM.
JonEisberg is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #80 of 103 Old 02-05-2013 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
casey1999's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: HI
Posts: 3,275
Thanks: 18
Thanked 45 Times in 44 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Re: Life Span of a Boat

Jon,
That is why I am leaving "the project" to my great grand kids......
casey1999 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Retraction of 520 Bridge draw span to halt traffic at 10:30 tonight - The Seattle Tim NewsReader News Feeds 0 05-08-2012 11:40 PM
Biloxi Bridge Span Collapses After Barge Strike Freesail99 General Discussion (sailing related) 3 03-21-2009 02:01 PM
Life span of a boat??????????? T37Chef Sailboat Design and Construction 62 06-13-2008 08:31 PM
Life Span of a Sail fjc1022@comcast.net General Discussion (sailing related) 5 06-15-2006 05:54 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome