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  #11  
Old 02-11-2013
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Re: Headsail only in heavy weather?

There is no one right answer. It depends on the boat, wind velocity, seas, point of sail and crew. A 155 on a furler is going to get beat to crap in a gale. From what I have read, a Gale Sail is nearly impossible to rig when you need it. Most boats don't have a detachable inner stay or way to rig a storm jib with a sail on a furler. Know the limits of you and your boat and plan for the worst.
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Old 02-11-2013
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Re: Headsail only in heavy weather?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife
I wouldnt worry about mast pumping.
You will or should if that mast is now harmonically moving back and forth to the extent that your stays/shrouds are momentarily (instantaneously impacting) exceeding the material strength limits of the wire ... and your chainplates are 'old' and full of 'accumulated fatigue'.

Most chainplate systems are grossly under-designed for fatigue failure ... right out of the boat builders shop. With the common stainless steels you only get about 1 million load cycles (about 1 circumnavigation) above 30% stress ... then the plates, etc. are usually very prone to fail, suddenly and without much warning.
Excellent points... No One Size Fits All answer to the original query, but Mark might worry a bit more about mast pumping if he'd ever on sailed some of the boats I have over the years... Including my own, as a matter of fact... (grin)

With a deck-stepped rig, with inline shrouds (no fore and aft lowers, nor swept spreaders), even the most robust baby stay might do little to alleviate pumping or inverting the mast when sailing upwind in a blow... Doing so under a headsail alone could be a recipe for disaster on some boats, and I'm very happy to have the addition of an inner forestay and running backs when confronted with those conditions...

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Originally Posted by jsaronson View Post
There is no one right answer. It depends on the boat, wind velocity, seas, point of sail and crew. A 155 on a furler is going to get beat to crap in a gale. From what I have read, a Gale Sail is nearly impossible to rig when you need it. Most boats don't have a detachable inner stay or way to rig a storm jib with a sail on a furler. Know the limits of you and your boat and plan for the worst.
I think the supposed difficulty of hoisting ATN's Gale Sail is overstated, it's really not all that different from hoisting a regular hanked-on storm jib... Of course, it always helps if you anticipate, and do it before conditions are approaching gale force... (grin)

Admittedly, I've only flown one over a furled staysail, which obviously is gonna be a less daunting prospect than working right up at the pointy end... However, I've found the trick that greatly eases setting it, is the use of a 'sleeve' made from a slippery fabric like Stamoid, which is wrapped around the furled sail at least to the height of the clew and sheets. Once that's in place, the Gale Sail will slide up over all the little ridges and protuberances of the furled jib and sheets much more easily... Sure, setting such a sail in anything more than a near-gale will always be a bit 'exciting', to say the least, but by no means impossible...
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Old 02-11-2013
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Re: Headsail only in heavy weather?

Then you have the, the OP IIRChas a ranger 23 or there abouts......so I doubt he will be in the southern pacific or equal, more like here in puget sound in some 30-40 knot winds, maybe 5-6' seas, could be short or long depending upon wind direction vs tide.......

I have used personally just a 110 or 140 one time, "MY" boat with a mini forestay sails quite well up to the mid 30 knot range. I do have a storm sail, works well with a reef or 2 reefs in the main upwards those wind speeds!

I think the "it depends" is a good answer, ie boat type, style, wind speed, where you are at etc.

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Old 02-12-2013
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Re: Headsail only in heavy weather?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
You will or should if that mast is now harmonically moving back and forth to the extent that your stays/shrouds are momentarily (instantaneously impacting) exceeding the material strength limits of the wire ... and your chainplates are 'old' and full of 'accumulated fatigue'.

Most chainplate systems are grossly under-designed for fatigue failure ... right out of the boat builders shop. With the common stainless steels you only get about 1 million load cycles (about 1 circumnavigation) above 30% stress ... then the plates, etc. are usually very prone to fail, suddenly and without much warning.
Maybe a lot less time. I need to replace mine after 13 years offshore and I'm not even half way. These were new prior to departing from Seattle.
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Old 02-12-2013
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Re: Headsail only in heavy weather?

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Originally Posted by aeventyr60 View Post
Maybe a lot less time. I need to replace mine after 13 years offshore and I'm not even half way. These were new prior to departing from Seattle.
Well, your Ty37 plates have a kink where they go through the deck, and thats what a structuralist would call a 'stress riser' .... and where the Ty37 plate usually fails. For your replacements: make that kink 'a more gradual' transition and the plates 'thicker' and then mirror polish them ... will get you much longer service life vs. fatigue.
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Re: Headsail only in heavy weather?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
Well, your Ty37 plates have a kink where they go through the deck, and thats what a structuralist would call a 'stress riser' .... and where the Ty37 plate usually fails. For your replacements: make that kink 'a more gradual' transition and the plates 'thicker' and then mirror polish them ... will get you much longer service life vs. fatigue.
Thanks Rich! I pretty much followed that same process when I replaced them. Maybe this time try to lessen the kink. Wondering how thick to go? I think these are 3/8 or 7/16.
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