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  #51  
Old 02-16-2013
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Re: Seasick medication

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Originally Posted by IronSpinnaker View Post
On the show he demonstrated placing the IV in his wife and giving her "life saving fluid" He completely missed the vein and was running fluids into her interstitial tissue...
My wife and I were watching a (fictional) movie with a diabetic woman taking an insulin shot (my wife is diabetic and takes insulin shots.) The woman in the movie tied her arm with a rubber tube and went searching for a nice plump vein, like she was shooting heroin or something.
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  #52  
Old 02-16-2013
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Re: Seasick medication

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Originally Posted by scratchee View Post
My wife and I were watching a (fictional) movie with a diabetic woman taking an insulin shot (my wife is diabetic and takes insulin shots.) The woman in the movie tied her arm with a rubber tube and went searching for a nice plump vein, like she was shooting heroin or something.
That would be one of the easiest ways for a diabetic to kill them selves: There is a rather Controversial and dangerous method of bringing down a high Potassium level which involves giving the Patient Insulin Intravenously. Many hospitals now ban the practice, but some still use it. I hate getting orders to preform this procedure. I have had more than one patient end up with critically low BS as a result and end up practically comatose and in the ICU. It is amazing how small of a dose of IV insulin can drop somebodies blood sugar to 20 mg/dl.. And even more amazing how much Dextrose it takes to bring them back up to a normal level.
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  #53  
Old 02-16-2013
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Re: Seasick medication

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Originally Posted by jobberone View Post
I don't want to cut the dose because I don't get seasick. I'm merely curious and I'm a physician. I've prescribed the patch but never used it.
In that case prescribe somebody a patch with orders to cut it in half and watch how fast after the Pharmacist receives it you get a call that they will not dispense it.
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  #54  
Old 02-16-2013
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Re: Seasick medication

If you are up in canada i would suggest a tablet called gravol works good, and ginger ail does a nice job with the stomach too.
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Old 02-16-2013
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Re: Seasick medication

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Originally Posted by IronSpinnaker View Post
In that case prescribe somebody a patch with orders to cut it in half and watch how fast after the Pharmacist receives it you get a call that they will not dispense it.
I really resent this. No where have I said I was interested in prescribing or advocating anything. Again this is a friendly discussion on a forum.
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Old 02-16-2013
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Re: Seasick medication

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Originally Posted by IronSpinnaker View Post
In that case prescribe somebody a patch with orders to cut it in half and watch how fast after the Pharmacist receives it you get a call that they will not dispense it.
I did not read where he was advocating anyone doing that. I think he is simply curious. If you do it with gloves on, I don't see what the big deal is. If he is a physician, I assume he has enough common sense and experience to know how to handle the product.

My opinions,

Brian
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  #57  
Old 02-16-2013
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Re: Seasick medication

We have used a wide variety of products. I do not pretend to be the expert on them, but I will give you my experience over the last eighteen years.

A good basic product (especially for kids) is perpermint. Yes, just like you buy at the grocery store. We keep it aboard and the kids have it in their mouth anytime we are making a long run or in weather. It is cheap and works "ok".

Next up is ginger. You can buy it from nutritional stores in large doses (milligrams). You can also buy ginger beer (it is non-alcoholic) from many nutritional stores which has a high content of ginger. Ginger Ale (Canada Dry) seems to have a very low mg. However, carbonation does seem to help us. You can also get a high concentration ginger ale as I recall, but not at the grocery stores. One easy trick is to bake ginger snaps and keep them easily accessibe. I will say that ginger is not completely without its side effects: it gives me the burps so bad I often don't bother with it. However, it too is safe for kids. We gave up long ago on carrying the ginger beer because of space and instead carry the ginger pills (and Canada Dry, but for drinks, not medicinal). The Ginger product we use is Spring Valley 550 mg Ginger Root.

We have used several of the OTC meds in the past and gave up on them as not being very effective and still making us sleepy.

Next up is Scoplamine. I have read through many of the comments about it on this thread and we quite surprised. I have never had that nor have I ever witnessed it. I am not discounting what others have said, but giving my experience over the last 18 years of boating. Quite candidly, Scope patches are our drug of choice (for adults). The issue with Scope that is a big negative for us is that you cannot make out writing or things through binocs. Forget trying to read... especially small print. I think that is part of how it works - by screwing up te signals between your eyes and brain and ears. It does make you a bit tired, but nothing like other meds we have taken. Another negative of scope is you have to put it on BEFORE you leave. It takes quite a while before really working for us (12 hours, though we generally start it the day before a passage). As such, it is not good for when you are sick, but rather a preventative beforehand. Another negative of this product is that I do not believe it can be used for children. I assume that has not changed anyways.

Next is Promethazine (Phenegran). It works pretty well and can be taken after getting sick, though honestly it is better to take before getting sick. We keep an eye out for the signs of sea sickness which are generally easy to spot (can discuss that below). We have carried both the pills and the suppository. Be aware, as the suppository was mentioned in this thread, it requires refrigeration. Personally, I would highly prefer that to trying to use an IV because it would seem to me that would be really hard to put in when the boat is rolling in large seas. If you get the pills, consider getting them in 12.5 mg. That is a "kids" dose. THe adult dose is 1-2 25mg pills. If you take two of them (25 mg), be ready to lose a lot of your cognitive ability. You will be tired and slow to react and may blur your vision. By messing around with lower doses (12.5 mg), you may find a lower dose that works for you. DO be aware that if you puke it up, you will have to wait until the next dose which I think is 6 hours.

The reality is that once someone gets sick, the key is to keep them hydrated. You have pretty much lost them to be any help for a while. We keep gatorade bottles easily available in the cockpit. Also, I would suggest keeping a 5 gallon bucket in the cockpit because it keeps someone from wanting to lean over the side of the boat to puke (dangerous). You can throw a bunch of paper towels in there with it and on top to help reduce others from sympathetic puking. We keep a line tied to it that we can toss over to fill (rinse). Good breezes and letting someone steer or put their face in the wind really helps us.

Regarding the original posters question about the Sturgeon, we did not find it any more effective than phenegran. However, everyones body is different. It is a pretty comon drug for cruisers, though we don't carry it.

My opinions. I am NOT a physician, so I do not want anyone to take this advice for themselves. It is simply our experiences as long-time users and boaters.

Brian

PS Signs of sea sickness should be discussed with the crew beforehand. They are being lathargic, cold sweating, and watering mouth. THe biggest one is probably being lathargic and always seem to kick in first. THis is the best time to stop someone from getting sick as once they puke or are close to, it is harder to stop the whole sea sick cycle (not just puking, incidentally, but a cycle of lethargy often including puking and sometimes diarhea which becomes harder to stop). So keep an eye out for each other and when someone is showing some signs, have them move around and trim sheets, steer, face in wind, pepperint or ginger snaps, etc. If that doesn't help, pull out the phenegran and repeat the above. Keeping them moving is key as is hydration. We consider sea sickness a very serious, and often under realized, danger in boating. As a best friend and life long sailor once told me: Everyone (EVERYONE) gets sea sick. We all just have different thresholds.
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Last edited by Cruisingdad; 02-16-2013 at 02:48 PM.
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  #58  
Old 02-16-2013
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Re: Seasick medication

There is no reason to be curious about it. It is illegal to use it in any manner other than what is approved by the FDA and I already showed the directions that state "DO NOT CUT THE PATCH".

Being curious about it is like being curious about providing alcohol to minors and wondering if they will get drunk and do stupid things.
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Re: Seasick medication

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Originally Posted by IronSpinnaker View Post
There is no reason to be curious about it. It is illegal to use it in any manner other than what is approved by the FDA and I already showed the directions that state "DO NOT CUT THE PATCH".

Being curious about it is like being curious about providing alcohol to minors and wondering if they will get drunk and do stupid things.
To the best of my knowledge, he was not going to use it. He is cutting it. Are you suggesting that cutting the patch is illegal? Cutting and using it, yeah, that may not go over well. But cutting it to see how it works is not.

And I highly dissagree with your analogy. He is not giving it to anyone. That would have offended me too.

Brian
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  #60  
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Re: Seasick medication

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Originally Posted by kellysails View Post
This Reletex Corporation really pisses me off. They could have easily created a version that allows you to change out the battery, but no. Greedy bastards. Whenever I get into a really foul mood I like to send them nasty grams. I think they have my email blocked now. While I'm thinking about it, it's time for another email.
Please excuse the thread drift but this is something I know a little about. If it makes you feel better to send emails go right ahead but donít expect anything from Reletex (Neurowave Medical Technologies) because I believe that they are only interested in maximizing profit and they have a method to do that. Hereís the storey:

Reliefband was owned/manufactured by Woodside Biomedical, Inc., in Carlsbad, California.

In the search for antiemetics with less side effects and/or that were cheaper (oh, the irony) there were several clinical trials that tried Reliefband to help alleviate post-operative and chemo. induced nausea. Anyone who is interested can look these up in PubMed. Iím not sure who paid for these trials and I canít be bothered to research it but they were probably paid for in full or part by NIH grants, i.e. U.S. taxpayer dollars.

Abbott Laboratories either purchased Woodside Biomedical or purchased the rights to Reliefband and Woodside Biomedical closed down.

Based on the advantages as described in the medical trials, someone, I believe Abbott but possibly Neurowave Medical Technologies, gained FDA approval. This is the key thing because it then allowed Reliefband (now known as Reletex) to become an approved medical device that could be charged to medical insurance, thus opening the doors significantly larger profits.

Abbot sold the rights to Neurowave Medical Technologies. Neurowave Medical Technologies is a privately held Illinois coporation based in Chicago. If you want to find out who owns the company, you can pull the corporate record if you want but the board of directors comprises middle eastern medical marketers and U.S. venture capitalists as follows:
Khalid Alagel is the Founder and CEO of The Gulf Care Group (GCG), an innovative healthcare consulting company which develops international patient programs for client hospitals.
Wilbur H. Gantz, III is President and Chief Executive Officer of PathoCapital LLC, a privately owned company investing in the healthcare field.
Farhan Hussain is the President and CEO of Neurowave Medical Technologies. Prior to NMT, Mr. Hussain was a founding partner of The Gulfcare Group (GCG).
Bruce V. Rauner is chairman of GTCR, a Chicago-based venture capital and private equity firm.

Also address for the U.S. office of Gulf Care Group is the same as the address of Neurowave Medical Technologies.

Clearly their model is to maximize profits by marketing single use medical devices to medical facilities who will use them help their patients. And because it is now a medical device and insurance will pay, they can charge much higher prices than before. And because it is single use, they can sell more of them.

I donít believe they have any incentive to market to the public or to make a device with reusable batteries. I will leave you to draw your own conclusions.
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