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jobberone 02-14-2013 02:52 PM

Seasick medication
 
I saw some posts recently about a medication not prescribed in the US that is really good for nausea but I've searched and can't find it. I'm sure it's because I'm not using the search engine properly but help anyway.

I'm familiar with all the US meds and have no problem getting the patch but I personally don't like it much. Inapsine I have but I prefer not to use this if I can. I also have some Zofran but again prefer not to use that for mild nausea.

Is there something out there that's new and not available in the US. PS: not crazy about the idea Salivet although have never used and have no experience.

I don't get seasick often (once since the first time) but the wife gets queasy. But I haven't been in a lot of bad weather either.

Thanks.

rockDAWG 02-14-2013 03:10 PM

Re: Seasick medication
 
I think you may be talking about Stugeron (generic name Cinnarizine) which is not available in U.S. However it is the same derivative of piperazine of Bonine or Antivert which is available OTC in U.S. They all work well if it is taking before the voyage.

Prior to take the seasickness med, try it at home to see if any side effect occurs on land.

Salivette won't work. To prevent excessive over production of saliva, use crystallized ginger root (not the sweet one).

Brent Swain 02-14-2013 04:02 PM

Re: Seasick medication
 
Stugeron, available in Mexico and Britain is great stuff. Long shelf life. Take it, then try reading on a moving vehicle,. If it works there it will probably work at sea.
British stuff is 15 mg, Mexican 75 mg. Takes 5 British ones to match a Mexican one.

jobberone 02-14-2013 04:15 PM

Re: Seasick medication
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rockDAWG (Post 990196)
I think you may be talking about Stugeron (generic name Cinnarizine) which is not available in U.S. However it is the same derivative of piperazine of Bonine or Antivert which is available OTC in U.S. They all work well if it is taking before the voyage.

Prior to take the seasickness med, try it at home to see if any side effect occurs on land.

Salivette won't work. To prevent excessive over production of saliva, use crystallized ginger root (not the sweet one).

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brent Swain (Post 990225)
Stugeron, available in Mexico and Britain is great stuff. Long shelf life. Take it, then try reading on a moving vehicle,. If it works there it will probably work at sea.
British stuff is 15 mg, Mexican 75 mg. Takes 5 British ones to match a Mexican one.

Yeah, that was it. I didn't remember it was an antihistamine type drug so that's no help to me. Salivex is a med that has THC as its antiemetic which is why I wasn't crazy about it. Thanks for the help. We'll take some antihistamine for her and bring some patches if that doesn't work.

kellysails 02-14-2013 04:34 PM

Re: Seasick medication
 
My wife bought a "Relief Band" a number of years ago. It is great! No meds and it works well for her. Unfortunately that company went out of business and was taken over by a robber who only sells the bands that are disposable. The original band allowed you to simply replace the battery, like a watch, as needed. This really does work!

Here is how:
Worn on the wrist, the Reletex produces a small neuromodulating current which stops peristalic waves in the stomach, ceasing nausea and vomiting. There are no side effects, no drugs to take and the stimulation sensation is minimal. The Reletex is effective for all types of motion related sickness whether its while flying, boating or riding in a car. Travel can be enjoyable again!

The is the new product from the new company, somewhat of a rip off IMHO. But this technology does work.
https://www.aeromedixrx.com/Reletex-...ea-Device.html

rockDAWG 02-14-2013 04:40 PM

Re: Seasick medication
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jobberone (Post 990227)
We'll take some antihistamine for her and bring some patches if that doesn't work.

For a day sailing, oral med is better. For an extended long voyage over a few days or more, the patch is preferred. Scopolamine patch lasts for three days. You rarely need more than 2 patches. Once you get your sea legs you don't need it, so you can peel it off from your skin.

Scopolamine causes more dry mouth than others, general speaking. A prolonged use will lead to redraw problem or re-bounced with a sudden redraw. Consult your physician when in doubt.

:)

rockDAWG 02-14-2013 04:50 PM

Re: Seasick medication
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kellysails (Post 990235)
My wife bought a "Relief Band" a number of years ago. It is great! No meds and it works well for her. Unfortunately that company went out of business and was taken over by a robber who only sells the bands that are disposable. The original band allowed you to simply replace the battery, like a watch, as needed. This really does work!

Here is how:
Worn on the wrist, the Reletex produces a small neuromodulating current which stops peristalic waves in the stomach, ceasing nausea and vomiting. There are no side effects, no drugs to take and the stimulation sensation is minimal. The Reletex is effective for all types of motion related sickness whether its while flying, boating or riding in a car. Travel can be enjoyable again!

The is the new product from the new company, somewhat of a rip off IMHO. But this technology does work.
https://www.aeromedixrx.com/Reletex-...ea-Device.html

Motion sickness is a central nervous system mediated symtom which is subjected many environmental factor as well as psychological effect. Placebo can play an important role. So if the wristband works, great, keep using it until it fails. I assume if you go off shore with heavy seas, the wristband or ginger will not work.

outbound 02-14-2013 05:07 PM

Re: Seasick medication
 
bonine- central antihistaminic/anticholinergic- suppreses output from area postrema in floor of 4th ventricle ( vomit center ) -quite effective. but also blocks central histamine from tubomammillary bodies ( they help maintain alertness). Hence, very good advise to try on land first. Don't want to make nav. or other errors. has long functional 1/2 life
Scop- central anticholinergic. Can block memory consolidation and cause confusion (especially if multiple patches used). Also good idea to try first on land to make sure no cognitive side effects.
given ~1/3 of folks respond to placebo and nocebo good idea to not talk about it.

killarney_sailor 02-14-2013 05:16 PM

I think it makes a great deal of sense to try various methods on shore first. There is no magic bullet for everyone. We have friends who use ginger with good effect, even ginger ale, but strong ginger beer or ginger tea. Obviously no side effects. We had a guest onboard in the Caribbean who put a patch behind each ear, she only has two university degrees so can't expect her to read the instructions and there were two patches in the package. She had an incredible range of the side-effects mentioned in the enclosure. I wonder how half a patch would work for those who only get a bit queasy?

rockDAWG 02-14-2013 05:39 PM

Re: Seasick medication
 
Two Scopolamine patches are way too much unless she is a 450 lbs Gal.

I would not used a half patch becasue it reduces the release rate of the drug by half. The therapeutic concentration of Scopolamine will never be reached. It is better to remote the patch if significant side effects are observed. The first side effect of the drug is dry mouth which is relatively easy to observe. For older folks, it may be difficulty in urination. After three days when the drug reaches at a steady state concentration in the body , one can use half patch as a maintenance dose.

Of course, your physician has the last words when it comes to your health. :)


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