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Old 02-23-2013
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My first day sailer. What do you pack in yours?

I had the following criteria for a day sailer:
1) super easily trailerable, and quickly rigged (under 30 min)
2) sloop rigged
3) stable - focused on relaxed, dry, sit inside, non-hiked, non-racer
4) plenty of room for 2-4 adults, or 2 adults and a 65 pound dog
5) auxiliary power

I chose the American 14.6 for the reasons above plus lots of others. Something just spoke to me with these boats for my particular use. It should be delivered by May.

My primary use will be for myself and my wife to get plenty of hours at the helm doing day sails on the Connecticut side of Long Island Sound, as well as at our lake in the Adirondacks. I'm hoping to spends lots of time this summer beach cruising the Norwalk islands, and various other areas of the CT coast line.

My sea kayaking gear should do double duty:
- PFD with signal mirror, Icom M24 VHF, compass, dive knife, etc.
- A first aid kit I put together in a dry box.
- high volume handheld bilge pump
- dry bags and lashings

I plan on anchor setup of line/chain and anchor in a 5 gal pail. A couple canoe paddles in case my aux power fails, a good cooler, and a waterproof bluetooth speaker for some tunes.

Wondering what everyone's thoughts are on gearing their small daysailers for a day of island hopping and beach cruising.
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Old 02-23-2013
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As a side note, while I there are some other boats I would have loved to find used (like a West Wight Potter, or O'Day DS, Montgomery 17), I looked for quite a while and didn't find anything within a reasonable distance. I also went with a new boat because I am gone 14-16 hours a day, and I'm frequently out of town. This leaves no room for a project. It barely leaves time for minor maintenance and upkeep for the standards I like to keep my things in. So, a new boat was my decision.
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Last edited by CaribDream; 02-23-2013 at 10:12 PM.
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Old 02-23-2013
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Re: My first day sailer. What do you pack in yours?

You may be underwhelmed by the performance of your American 14.6 exploring the Norwalk Islands in typical Long Island Sound summer wind conditions. The video I saw on the American 14.6 only shows the boat sailing on a reach... With a beam of 6', it may not be fun working to windward. A motor on the back will definitely affect (negatively) your sailing experience in such a relatively light boat. Four adults on the American 14.6 would be quite a crowd. A slightly bigger boat - the 19' O'Day Daysailer, centerboard version - might be better suited to what you're trying to do. A small motor won't impact its sailing performance as much, because it's a heavier boat. It has more sail area (though still not a lot) to move it along in light air. It's relatively stable because of it's weight, and probably much less expensive to buy. Trailering and rigging it shouldn't be much, if any, more difficult than for a the smaller American 14.6, but the larger boat should be able to handle more varied (read: rough) conditions and provide more varied options to you as your sailing horizons expand. A bigger boat is perhaps not as well suited for your lake, but beaching a used boat - since there aren't many docks on the Norwalk Islands - is also much easier on the conscience than scratching up a brand new boat on the rough shoreline. Your kayaking background is serving you well for first aid and backup plans though. In any case, enjoy!
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Old 02-23-2013
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I went with a Honda 2.3hp air cooled motor. It weighs about 30 pounds. I would assume that's not significant enough to dramatically effect sailability. 99.9% of the time, it will be just me and the wife, maybe my dog. As I said, all criteria I had went before performance. A nice sail where we aren't hiking the boat and not constantly worrying about capsize is the biggest consideration. I had to buy a boat not just for me, but for my wife too. If I scare her, there won't be much more sailing happening. As for beaching, I would rather anchor slightly off shore vs raking the boat over a shoreline.
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Old 02-23-2013
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Re: My first day sailer. What do you pack in yours?

That boat looks like a lot of fun, I think you've got a great match for your use case A couple thoughts:

If you're concerned about damaging the bottom when beaching or island hopping, it may be worth it to have something installed along the bottom (like a keelshield or just a couple strips of aluminum or extra patch of fiberglass) so that you are comfortable with just running aground on gravel and sand. That is certainly part of the fun for my kids and I when we put the sailing rig on our dinghy Running aground deliberately in a boat that can easily do it is a bit of a joy, compared to accidentally running aground in a bigger boat where you have to fight tooth and nail to get her free again! If you are comfortable riding right up on an island you could also leave the anchor at home if you are looking for extra space aboard.

I always used a gallon jug with the top quarter cut out as a "bilge pump"... call me old fashioned, but it works and is easy on space for a small boat

Between sails and a brand new motor you should be well covered for auxiliary options, you could probably get by with a folding paddle, after all you've got sails and new outboard.

I think you're in for good times... congratulations!

Last edited by cjlmia; 02-23-2013 at 11:31 PM. Reason: changed paddle thoughts, I think it may be a coast guard requirement
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Old 02-23-2013
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Re: My first day sailer. What do you pack in yours?

Congratulations on your new boat. While I have not sailed your neck of the woods, I sailed a Flying Scott for several years, and here are some things that I have found helpful (some you may have and did not mention)
1. A chart for whatever water you are in- lake or salt. It is surprising how you can get turned around in seemingly familiar waters.
2. A good pair of binoculars.
3. Plan on getting back to the dock after dark- I don’t care how well you plan, it will happen sooner or later. With your boat length, you have some lighting options but you want to make sure you are seen. A lot of portable options are available.
4. Compass
5. You mentioned ground tackle. Test it out sometime when the wind comes up and make sure it is up for the job.
6. Foul weather gear. A blanket in a plastic bag is also a good idea. With rain and some wind hypothermia is a real threat even during the summer months and you are only 3.6 degrees away from it.
7. Standard safety gear like flares and a horn.
8. Engine manual and an extra spark plug. The wind died one day and so did my engine while I was daysailing around Ohio Key. The tide was running toward the nearest shore and I was glad I had enough anchor to hold me until I figured out (from the manual) that I forgot to open the gas cap vent and drew a vacuum on the fuel tank of that 2 hp engine. Pretty embarrassing for an old submarine machinist mate. I am now a big believer in pre-underway checklists.
9. Extra line. You will use it in ways you can’t imagine.
10. Plan on someone (or your pet) going over the side. I had a small folding ladder on the back of the Flying Scott.

All boats have something in common regardless of the size- unexpected stuff happens. Be safe and have a great time.
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Old 02-24-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by radcat:994213
Congratulations on your new boat. While I have not sailed your neck of the woods, I sailed a Flying Scott for several years, and here are some things that I have found helpful (some you may have and did not mention)
1. A chart for whatever water you are in- lake or salt. It is surprising how you can get turned around in seemingly familiar waters.
2. A good pair of binoculars.
3. Plan on getting back to the dock after dark- I don’t care how well you plan, it will happen sooner or later. With your boat length, you have some lighting options but you want to make sure you are seen. A lot of portable options are available.
4. Compass
5. You mentioned ground tackle. Test it out sometime when the wind comes up and make sure it is up for the job.
6. Foul weather gear. A blanket in a plastic bag is also a good idea. With rain and some wind hypothermia is a real threat even during the summer months and you are only 3.6 degrees away from it.
7. Standard safety gear like flares and a horn.
8. Engine manual and an extra spark plug. The wind died one day and so did my engine while I was daysailing around Ohio Key. The tide was running toward the nearest shore and I was glad I had enough anchor to hold me until I figured out (from the manual) that I forgot to open the gas cap vent and drew a vacuum on the fuel tank of that 2 hp engine. Pretty embarrassing for an old submarine machinist mate. I am now a big believer in pre-underway checklists.
9. Extra line. You will use it in ways you can’t imagine.
10. Plan on someone (or your pet) going over the side. I had a small folding ladder on the back of the Flying Scott.

All boats have something in common regardless of the size- unexpected stuff happens. Be safe and have a great time.
Wow, thanks for this! This is exactly what I was looking for. Binocs, extra line, charts (waterproof), compass (x2), flares, air horn - I have all these. However, the rest of your points I didn't think of.

The lighting is a great point, I'll def look into it. I bet a small cheap solar light could be placed at the top of the mast easily to start. Also will bring the flashlights from my kayaking gear.

Spark plug - don't know why I didn't think of this before as I do this on my motor boat. Engine manual, great idea.

I was also thinking about putting the ground tackle bucket, and my extra fuel forward, to each side of the centerboard tunnel. This would help as ballast and be out of the way.

Thanks for the great reply.
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Old 02-24-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjlmia:994210
That boat looks like a lot of fun, I think you've got a great match for your use case

I always used a gallon jug with the top quarter cut out as a "bilge pump"... call me old fashioned, but it works and is easy on space for a small boat

Between sails and a brand new motor you should be well covered for auxiliary options, you could probably get by with a folding paddle, after all you've got sails and new outboard.

I think you're in for good times... congratulations!
Thanks! I see a lot of people like a jug. For me, I already have the AquaBound BilgeMaster from my sea kayaking gear. The are much smaller than a jug, float, and move enormous amounts of water. They are a fantastic product. As you can imagine there's no room for bailing in a kayak that's only 21 inches wide, 17 feet long, and enclosed. These things are literally life saving equipment.

Thanks again for the well wishes.
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Old 02-24-2013
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Re: My first day sailer. What do you pack in yours?

For my 16' daysailer mine is racing boat but i like to cruise and relax on it. i bring radio, handheld vhf, Bunch of waters, food, handheld pump, anchor, and all 3 sails spinnaker, main , jib,. sometime only fly the main but on light wind days flying all 3 is fun. and looks cool
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Old 02-24-2013
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Re: My first day sailer. What do you pack in yours?

Carib,

Take a Sailing and Seamanship Course from your local Power Squadron, especially if you'll be sailing the coast at all. It isn't a sailing course per se', but teaches all that boating stuff that people that have "been around boat their whole lives" tend to be missing. Kind of a "don't know what they don't know" thing.

Small boat, consider free, downloadable Booklet Charts, in plastic covers in a three ring binder. I put my plastic covers in upside down and tape the bottom closed Keeps the water out. For a mast light, I've used a $4 LED puck light in a Walmart bag in a pinch. The bag takes some of the sting out of the LEDs and makes it look like a real light. But is it visible for 2 NM? Can't say.
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