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-   -   Halyards to cockpit? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/97023-halyards-cockpit.html)

deltaten 02-26-2013 08:59 AM

Halyards to cockpit?
 
How important is it?

Going to be single-handing mostly, on a 27 foot with 150+/- sf main and jibs between 150 and 275 +/- sf. Novice to bigger boats; but quite a few miles under the dink keel :D

In process of selecting running rigging and yesterday pulled the old off the boat for measurement. I wouldn't mind the extra cost of line; but the deck hardware to rig halyards to the 'pit is outrageous!.

Is it *so* important to be able to drop/haul sails from the cockpit; or am I making too much of it?

TIA

chucklesR 02-26-2013 09:02 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
It's not important at all if your boat can track a course without you at the helm.

blutoyz 02-26-2013 09:16 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
I am going to lurk on this one because I have the same question and experience level. :D

downeast450 02-26-2013 09:33 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
I single hand our I-28 a lot here on the Maine coast. I added a jib downhaul and have my jib halyard running to the cockpit. I like it for the ease and control of dropping the jib at the end of the day or if I am getting ready to pick up a mooring. The jib is safe on deck with a little tension on one of the sheets and I can quickly secure it with a bungee. Having some netting forward helps. Raising it from its "parking place" is simple, too. My main halyard remains on the mast.

Adding a jamb cleat for the downhaul was all I needed. I have a clutch and a winch set up for the spinnaker already in the cockpit. I used the fairleads for the spinnaker downhaul to run the jib downhaul back.

Down

Noclew 02-26-2013 09:35 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
Have you read any tips and techniques by Andrew Evans, a singlehanded racer in SF Bay area who sails an Olson 30? Many great tips in his free ebook at sfbaysss dot org. He details how to use surgical tubing to steer a steady course as he works the bow rigging (spinnaker for him - not mainsail or jib).

181 pages, but it is free and has a good index. Well worth the time, imo, for anyone who sails, especially a SH sailor. The ebook also includes his suggested internet resources for additional info eg. trimming sails, the physics of sailing, weather, etc.

Faster 02-26-2013 09:50 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
If you're single-handed, and if reefing lines are NOT run aft, I think leaving the main halyard on the mast makes sense. An autopilot or effective self steering helps tremendously, of course.. but leaving it all on the mast means a single trip out of the cockpit to hoist, douse, or reef.

I also agree with the premise that running a jib halyard aft, and downhaul if hanked on, makes sense sailing shorthanded. Double lifelines, netting or lacing can help keep a dropped headsail on deck in that case.

TQA 02-26-2013 09:51 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
I would much rather have a reliable autopilot than have the lines led back.

I single hand a 44 ft cutter much of the time.

sailingfool 02-26-2013 09:57 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Faster (Post 995233)
If you're single-handed, and if reefing lines are NOT run aft, I think leaving the main halyard on the mast makes sense. An autopilot or effective self steering helps tremendously, of course.. but leaving it all on the mast means a single trip out of the cockpit to hoist, douse, or reef...

I agree with Faster's advice, and even further that even with reefing lines run aft, unless you have single line reefing, you may as well leave the main at the mast. If you need to go to the mast to set the reef tack, or to ease the vang, you may as well also handle the halyard there.

As to the jib halyard, if you have a roller furler setup, you can leave the jib halyard on the mast also. (If you do not have a roller furling jib, you should get it!).

JonEisberg 02-26-2013 09:58 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by deltaten (Post 995205)

Is it *so* important to be able to drop/haul sails from the cockpit; or am I making too much of it?

TIA

I think too much is made in general of the ability to do so... KISS, leave everything at the mast...

chucklesR 02-26-2013 10:01 AM

Re: Halyards to cockpit?
 
Having talked in the chat room I feel compelled to make a fuller answer.

It's a matter really of budget and space. You can always just let your sheets go and flog until you can get to them.
Without knowing your specific deck layout I can't tell if you'll need deck organizers to redirect lines around your cabin top/hatch.

A jib downhaul only needs to be 1/4 line, a block and jammer. Run it back through stanchion bases, or blocks on the stanchion base.

On a 27 foot the added friction of running a main halyard aft doesn't put enough load on the line to prevent a fast hoist hand over hand. You can always sway it tighter once you are set on a steady course.
Rather than a jam cleat I'd suggest a clutch for the stopper- it gives more control. Garhauer makes a triple clutch unit in stainless for about 130 bucks IIRC (it's not listed, you have to call). They ain't pretty, they ain't light, but they are strong and they work. They also sell a 3x deck organizer for about 60.
Get both of those and 3 turning blocks that will fit you mast step and you've got all you need to run a reef line, main halyard and jib halyard to the cockpit. Turning block cost and size depend on line size, but a 40 mm from Garhauer is about 25 bucks, shackle included. 300 bucks is nothing for the added control and safety.

Putting in a reef on a small boat without leaving the cockpit is also a simple matter of a block and jammer/clutch. Put a turning block at the base of the mast, run a line through it to the cringle on the main that you'd normally hook at the mast.
Drop the main halyard (which presupposes it's run aft) to a set, marked point, then pull the reef line down tight. It'll hold.

Lazyjacks (a must) and a couple reef straps and you are done.


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