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geehaw 03-04-2013 02:37 AM

Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
Well please forgive me for not using all the correct terminology. So never used a spinnaker yet. I have one,told it looked like it never was used by PO who never used it. I never have taken it out of the bag. I have a pole, spinnaker halyard and the pole topping lift. My pole only has 1 bridle for the topping lift. Now I was shown on another boat that there is also a down-haul and an associated bridle on the pole, and he had a fitting on the deck for the down-haul. I don't have a bridle on the pole,or a fitting on the deck for a down-haul. Is this something I am missing or is it something that is not always needed? Greg

SchockT 03-04-2013 03:21 AM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
There is usually a downhaul as well as a topper. If the boat was rigged to run dedicated guys, meaning you have a set of sheets AND a set of guys, and the guy leads are quite far forward you could get away without a downhaul because the downward angle of the guy will hold the pole down. Ideally you should have a downhaul as it keeps the pole under control better. Although the foreguy is best going straight down to the foredeck, you could run it to a block at the base of the mast.

geehaw 03-04-2013 03:48 AM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
I wonder if maybe forward guy leads are what he used. I have a U-Bolt on the starboard side just forward of the shrouds, and a port-side one half way between shrouds and bow. I removed the starboard one because it leaked and couldn't find a use for it. Maybe blocks were used in these eye bolts.Greg

zz4gta 03-04-2013 09:18 AM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
Block were probably used there but if they aren't even on both sides then I wouldn't use them. Install the right stuff, and be happy.

What boat is it? Size? You can get away with sheets if the boat is >32'. Larger, and I'd look into guys as well. If you just do sheets then add twingers/tweakers.

Foreguy/downhaul = You'll need one if you plan on sailing any hot angles. The only boats that do well w/o them that I've been on are the J24 fleet. All they race is w/l courses, so they're always sailing deep. If you're reaching, use a downhaul.

Blocks at mast vs mid foredeck = if you use block(s) at the mast base, then you don't need to ease the downhaul to pull the pole back. However, the trade off is you don't get a good angle to pull the pole down. If you use a block in the middle of the foredeck then you get better purchase, but need to remember to ease the downhaul when you pull the pole back or trim it when you ease it forward.

Bridle = if you have a tappered pole (probably not) then you'll need a bridle for the downhaul.

Foreguy/downhaul (v2.0) = a foreguy is lead to the bow. Near the stem and somtimes goes through the front edge of the bow. A downhaul is lead to the foredeck and is a more common set up with end to end gybes.

svHyLyte 03-04-2013 11:07 AM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by geehaw (Post 998071)
I wonder if maybe forward guy leads are what he used. I have a U-Bolt on the starboard side just forward of the shrouds, and a port-side one half way between shrouds and bow. I removed the starboard one because it leaked and couldn't find a use for it. Maybe blocks were used in these eye bolts.Greg

I suspect the fittings were intended to take snatch blocks for storm jib sheets. On a spinnaker pole, you will need a foreguy to keep the outboard pole end from "skying", or being pulled upwards by the lift of the sail. If your pole has a bridle, your boat may be small enough that one can use an end-for-end gybe, wherein the mast end of the pole is detached, snapped over the lazy sheet and the working sheet freed and that end of the pole snapped over the mast fitting. In that case, one would normally find a fitting on the underside of the middle of the pole to take the foreguy, or, another, bridle, perhaps in the spinnaker bag that attaches to the underside of the pole and to be connected to a foreguy, typically connected to a snatch block at a pad-eye along the center line of the yacht forward of the mast.

http://www.hmc.edu/org/sailing/pictures/Figure9.gif

DonScribner 03-04-2013 12:43 PM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
Geehaw,

I've never flown a spinnaker and don't own one, so I can relate. I suggest you do what I would do. Get the video. There's more than one out there dedicated to wrangling the beast. Pick one up and see what's going on. Study like you used to tell your parents you did while you were really making time with that someone special. Then, hit the water on a light day.

I'm planning on making an asymmetrical this coming winter. No pole required and acts more like a huge, light air genoa, sort of. Sounds like a time anyway.

Have fun!

Don

Maine

Faster 03-04-2013 02:16 PM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
If a pole only has one bridle on it it should be for the downhaul... two is probably best, though.

The pole should hang on it's pins (the image below is 'right side up')

http://i213.photobucket.com/albums/c...psfabdd6bb.jpg

Try that and see if the bridle is actually for the downhaul.. it gets a lot more load than the polelift. It's unlikely that foreguys were used on an ODay 25.. and rarely on end-for-end poles either.

http://i213.photobucket.com/albums/c...ps77677fe8.jpg

jackdale 03-04-2013 03:21 PM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
The boat is an O'Day 25. I expect that it is an end-for-end set up. That would also explain the bridle. I think there should be two.

geehaw 03-04-2013 07:16 PM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
Ok so after getting all these responses I decided to trudge through the snow and take another look at my pole in the shed. And I see I have a pad-eye in the center, and if the hooks go up then it would be on the bottom. So PO must have run the downhaul to the mast base. Which seems to me to be right because the bridle sure does not seem to be strong enough to take much strain. Its coated wire and even with the coating on it it is for sure no more then 1/8th in.. But the ends do look like Faster showed so a bridle could be attached if wanted. Well thanks all for continuing my education.

svHyLyte 03-04-2013 07:25 PM

Re: Spinnaker Pole Rigging
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Faster (Post 998325)
If a pole only has one bridle on it it should be for the downhaul... two is probably best, though.

The pole should hang on it's pins (the image below is 'right side up')

http://i213.photobucket.com/albums/c...psfabdd6bb.jpg

Try that and see if the bridle is actually for the downhaul.. it gets a lot more load than the polelift. It's unlikely that foreguys were used on an ODay 25.. and rarely on end-for-end poles either.

http://i213.photobucket.com/albums/c...ps77677fe8.jpg

Faster--I think the only difference between our descriptions is the vernacular. What you are calling a "downhaul" in our vernacular a "foreguy", i.e. a guy tacked forward of the mast verses an "after-guy", or guy tacked aft of the mast. If you look at your own illustration you'll note that the line leading to the lower bridle is identified as a "foreguy", Non?


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