UK 220 volt spec to US 110 volt - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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  #11  
Old 04-02-2013
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And now for some factual answers...
All of your existing 220V lighting and heating loads will be able to operate at 120V/60Hz, but they will draw half the current, the lights will be dimmer and electric heaters/elements won't put out as much heat.
If you replace light bulbs with 120V ones of the same wattage then you risk overloading the wiring etc. of the lighting circuits. Have an electrician check the wire size and current ratings of the switches and determine what maximum current the lighting circuits can handle safely. This will allow you to work out how many 120V light bulbs (and their wattage) can be used. If you replace the 220V light bulbs with 120V ones of half the wattage of the originals you will be safe.
Any motors (such as the compressor motor on your fridge) will most likely burn out due to the lower voltage. Don't attempt to run any 220V motors at 120V.
It is possible to connect another 120V phase instead of the neutral which will give you 208V. This will most likely allow the motors to run without getting excessively hot and your light bulbs and heaters will work well too. The 60Hz will make the motors run faster but this shouldn't be an issue.
This assumes that two phases are available from the shore power and that the shore power earthing arrangement is suitable (star connected transformer with star point earthed).
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Old 04-02-2013
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Re: UK 220 volt spec to US 110 volt

He could get lucky. A quick look at the nameplate on the devices will determine if they are designed for dual voltage. Many single phase motors / heaters will have a nameplate that reads: "120/220 50/60Hz" and will have a wiring diagram or point connection schematic that shows how to configure them for each voltage. The difference between 50Hz and 60Hz is negligable for most things. Motors will run very slightly faster. (F=nP/120) Therefore, a 1500rpm motor (at 50Hz) will run at 1800rpm at 60Hz. A 1000rpm motor at 50Hz will run 1200rpm at 60Hz.

As to lighting, if you are very lucky and have LED lighting then it won't matter because it's all being converted to DC anyway. The AC input will have a sticker/nameplate that tells you what the required source must be. For instance, if you look at your laptop power supply, it will probably say "Input: 100-240VAC 50/60Hz" which means you can plug it into anything from 100VAC to 240VAC. The power supply is going to convert it to DC and it is rated to handle the associated current and wattage of anything in that range.

As to lighting, if it is not LED, you can likely get by with CFL bulbs which run at about half the wattage per lumen than incandescents. I hate CFLs too, but in your case you'll get the light you need without doubling the amperage on your wiring.

The point of utmost concern is the size of wiring for each of your devices and circuit breaker size. The circuit breaker is sized to protect the wire, not the load. The wire is sized for the estimated load on the circuit. The device itself is dumb, it will draw whatever it draws regardless of whether or not the wire or CB is sized for it, and that is the danger. That part is up to you to get right.

Last edited by ShoalFinder; 04-02-2013 at 09:52 AM.
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Old 04-02-2013
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Re: UK 220 volt spec to US 110 volt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tymadman View Post
And now for some factual answers...
All of your existing 220V lighting and heating loads will be able to operate at 120V/60Hz, but they will draw half the current, the lights will be dimmer and electric heaters/elements won't put out as much heat.
If you replace light bulbs with 120V ones of the same wattage then you risk overloading the wiring etc. of the lighting circuits. Have an electrician check the wire size and current ratings of the switches and determine what maximum current the lighting circuits can handle safely. This will allow you to work out how many 120V light bulbs (and their wattage) can be used. If you replace the 220V light bulbs with 120V ones of half the wattage of the originals you will be safe.
Any motors (such as the compressor motor on your fridge) will most likely burn out due to the lower voltage. Don't attempt to run any 220V motors at 120V.
It is possible to connect another 120V phase instead of the neutral which will give you 208V. This will most likely allow the motors to run without getting excessively hot and your light bulbs and heaters will work well too. The 60Hz will make the motors run faster but this shouldn't be an issue.
This assumes that two phases are available from the shore power and that the shore power earthing arrangement is suitable (star connected transformer with star point earthed).
I am pretty sure all the lights in the boat is operating by DC, it should be non issue. As other suggested, most of the appliance or motor may be dual voltage. Remember, Beneteau build boat for international market.

But anyway, I will contact Beneteau directly to see if I can get some help from them, or at least send me the schematic diagram and their specs for me to sort out.

Thanks guys
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Old 06-21-2013
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Re: UK 220 volt spec to US 110 volt

rockDAWG,
Did you get an answers from Beneteau? I am also considering a Fountaine Pajot that has a 220v 60Hz genset and configuration. Most of the devices are running DC, so maybe it wouldn't be a problem. The only real problem is if you want to hook up to shore power in the US or Bahamas, and the connection would be 110V 50Hz. I don't plan on staying on the dock, but sometimes it may be nice.
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Old 06-21-2013
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Re: UK 220 volt spec to US 110 volt

Is the gen set making 220 0r two legs of 110? The hertz is less important but US is 60.
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Old 06-22-2013
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Re: UK 220 volt spec to US 110 volt

I bought a current converter and put the between my 240 input and the 120 sore power if I want to plug into the dock. Its a 100 bucks at Amazone and that way I can now plug in wherever I am.

ATB
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Old 06-22-2013
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Re: UK 220 volt spec to US 110 volt

Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum
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