Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore. - Page 6 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree25Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #51  
Old 05-01-2013
krisscross's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NC
Posts: 1,708
Thanks: 23
Thanked 94 Times in 93 Posts
Rep Power: 2
krisscross is on a distinguished road
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
Not fundamentally opposed to singlehanding but it is important to realize that it is much more dangerous than sailing even with two people. In the last 30,000 miles we have known of two boats being lost, both were singlehanders.
Yes, that is a very important safety issue. While sailing alone in general can be very relaxing and fun, long passages alone even by very experienced sailors can be truly challenging. I would definitely invest in gear that makes it easier, like a good radar, wind vane steering, and up to date electronics for navigation, weather, and communication.
__________________
Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
Plato
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #52  
Old 05-01-2013
Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 3,611
Thanks: 5
Thanked 86 Times in 75 Posts
Rep Power: 9
killarney_sailor is on a distinguished road
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

Kris's, we have all of the gear you mention, bur would probably be dead if singlehanded and having a nap at noon on a certain sunny day off the coast of Ecuador. We would have been rundown by a large container ship that was paying no attention at all - and we were transmitting on AIS and have a fancy radar reflector. A call on the radio woke him up just before we were going to make a major course adjustment.

The oceans are not as they were during the days of Chichester and Moitessier. All that crap that is made in China and elsewhere and all the raw materials going to China to make the crap are in ships going hither and yon. When we were at Durban there were two dozen ships anchored off the harbour waiting their turn to go into the already full port. Off Mackay in Queensland there were 14 ships just waiting to load with coal alone. These are big ships (some of them appear on the AIS with lengths listed in fractions of miles) and they have much smaller crews than in days gone by. Singlehand if you want, just be aware of the risks.
__________________
Back to Grenada in early December. Not sure I will remember how to sail. Will spend the winter and early spring in the Caribbean and then head to Bermuda and the northeast US. Still trying to decide if we will bring the boat to Canada, either in 2015 or 2016.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #53  
Old 05-01-2013
MarkofSeaLife's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2,548
Thanks: 33
Thanked 95 Times in 78 Posts
Rep Power: 5
MarkofSeaLife is on a distinguished road
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
Singlehand if you want, just be aware of the risks.
Yes the risks are certainly there... In spades. One needs to be conscious of them and assess risk.

I disagree with the post from krisscross about wind vane steering. Two single sailors I know nearly did when their boats hit the turf using wind vane steering.
I would never have it on my boat. If I was on a boat with it I would never leave the cockpit unattended with it on. Auto pilots are the only way to go IMHO.

Still the thing that worries me is the dinghy. Lots of solo sailors fall in or out of them at dinghy docks, or on the way to and from the boat. Sounds crazy to die that way but its much more prevelant that anyone believes.

I took a spill the other day climbing onto a high wharf and lost my balance half way up, splashed in, computer and all. Fortunately it was daylight, i hit nothing, I was sober and had a friend with me (and the computer was water tight)


Take care....


Mark
__________________
Sea Life
Notes on a Circumnavigation:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #54  
Old 05-01-2013
krisscross's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: NC
Posts: 1,708
Thanks: 23
Thanked 94 Times in 93 Posts
Rep Power: 2
krisscross is on a distinguished road
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

I appreciate the comments from people with lots of experience. I doubt I will ever make long singlehanded passages, but I was hoping that having an active radar does allow you to wake up before it is too late to avoid collision. Of course, if you don't hear the alarm because you are sleeping like a log from being dead tired, that is a mute point. As to the windvane, I was thinking of having it as an addition and backup to an auto pilot, which these days most sailors have anyway. Relying on windvane when close to the shore is definitely very risky.
__________________
Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.
Plato
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #55  
Old 05-01-2013
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,013
Thanks: 0
Thanked 141 Times in 125 Posts
Rep Power: 5
JonEisberg will become famous soon enough
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkofSeaLife View Post

I disagree with the post from krisscross about wind vane steering. Two single sailors I know nearly did when their boats hit the turf using wind vane steering.
I would never have it on my boat. If I was on a boat with it I would never leave the cockpit unattended with it on. Auto pilots are the only way to go IMHO.
Just a hunch, but I'm gonna guess you've never actually USED a windvane, correct? (grin)

Certainly, using any form of self-steering in proximity to a coast, or any other known hazards, is always risky, and will necessitate the proper caution... And, many boats may not be particularly suited to the use of a vane... But to suggest that to leave the cockpit of a boat being steered by a vane is inherently any more risky to to do so on a boat under the control of an AP is just silly, in my view... My boat's been steered thousands of trouble-free miles under a vane, and far more effectively than under my tillerpilot when the going begins to get a bit more sporty...



A boat can be put on the bricks just as easily under an autopilot, as by a vane... Just ask Jeanne Socrates, whose first attempt at a solo circumnavigation came to an end a mere 100 miles short of completion, after a malfunction of her AP but NERIEDA on a Baja beach during one of her catnaps...

Sadly, we can't ask any of the 4 crew of AEGEAN who died during last year's Newport-Ensenada Race, after their autopilot drove them straight and true right into the cliffs on North Coronado Island...

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #56  
Old 05-01-2013
GeorgeB's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Alameda, San Francisco Bay
Posts: 1,607
Thanks: 1
Thanked 42 Times in 41 Posts
Rep Power: 10
GeorgeB is on a distinguished road
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

Jon, not to change the subject, but can you provide a couple of comments regarding your jerry can storage? Like how they are secured and why the cockpit and not along the lifelines amidships? I am contemplating a pair of jugs for my Baja trip and was thinking of securing them to the lifeline stanchions via some starboard or a fender board. I am sure Mrs. B would object to having them in our cockpit as they would interfere with the binnacle mounted table. Any advice and comments will be most welcome.
__________________
George B
2000 Catalina 34 MkII
Alameda, Ca.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #57  
Old 05-01-2013
Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 3,611
Thanks: 5
Thanked 86 Times in 75 Posts
Rep Power: 9
killarney_sailor is on a distinguished road
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

An autopilot can screw up just as a vane can (I have both onboard). I referenced my friend's uncontrolled gybe off Namibia caused by the autopilot croaking unexpectedly. This is on a costly, well-maintained vessel. One of the singlehanders I mentioned losing his boat (actually perhaps it was ok because it was steel but it was well-up on the rocks) was because his vane was too faithful. He was aiming for the river going into Bundaberg, Oz coming from New Zealand. He was asleep when he should not have been and missed the river mouth by something like 50 m.
__________________
Back to Grenada in early December. Not sure I will remember how to sail. Will spend the winter and early spring in the Caribbean and then head to Bermuda and the northeast US. Still trying to decide if we will bring the boat to Canada, either in 2015 or 2016.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #58  
Old 05-01-2013
Omatako's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Auckland New Zealand
Posts: 2,448
Thanks: 0
Thanked 30 Times in 27 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Omatako will become famous soon enough
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
Gee, you have been in different places than we have. At times I have been incredibly impressed by how many ships there are and you can't really avoid them if you are going in more or less the same direction as you are. Some bust spots that occur to me are along the west coast of South America, north shore of the Dominican Republic and passing south of Madagascar. In all cases we saw 2-3 ships at least during the night and this does not include fishing vessels, just freighters.
Yes, clearly my opinion is reserved for open ocean. As I said in my original post, most shipping is experienced on coastal passages and from your description most of the ships you saw were coastal.

I crossed from Africa to Madagascar crewed and saw only one vessel as we were approaching Nose Be.

From Madagascar to Seychelles crewed, nothing.

I sailed from Seychelles single handed to Christmas Island and saw fishing boats that if I collided with them they would probably sink first and in 5 weeks of sailing saw one container ship south of Sri Lanka.

I sailed crewed from San Diego to Marquesas 24 days and saw one ship at sea other than a cruise liner entering the bay at Nuku Hiva.

We sailed from Nuku Hiva to Bora Bora, saw nothing. From Bora Bora to Raratonga, nothing, from Raratonga to New Zealand, nothing until we were 20 miles from the coast.

Of course there are places where there is shipping but it is mostly coastal or on charted shipping routes. On any given day approaching Panama you could see 50 or more ships.

The one problem that modern technology brings us is that we all use GPS to run the Rhumb Line as do all ships. So it's not really surprising that some of us will die.

Also let me say that single-handing is something I do only when all other options have been exhausted - it is not something that I enjoy.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

__________________

"Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying."

Arthur C. Clarke
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #59  
Old 05-01-2013
barefootnavigator's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Salish Sea
Posts: 612
Thanks: 24
Thanked 22 Times in 22 Posts
Rep Power: 3
barefootnavigator is on a distinguished road
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jephotog View Post
As an armchair fan of big passages in small boats I'd like to add my .02.

The wwp was a 19 not a 14 small but big difference. He sailed it there then shipped it back. He sailed to Hawaii recently on a J30 I think, he would not repeat the wwp experience.

Just because you own your current boat that is kinda/ sorta /might be capable does not mean its a good start for such a trip. People who sail long voyages in small ships usually don't do it with the boat off the shelf or 30 year old rigging they bought it with. The Catalina 27 that circumnavigated had lots of structural upgrades. By the time your Ranger was ready you would have to pour a lot of money into it, that you'd be better off starting with a different boat with a little more capacity.
Actually the guy I am referring to did it in a wwp 14 but thanks for incorrectly correcting me.

Last edited by barefootnavigator; 05-01-2013 at 09:52 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #60  
Old 05-01-2013
youmeandthed's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 109
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 3
youmeandthed is on a distinguished road
Re: Amuse me, sailing small boat offshore.

So many people sail offshore asleep. Just use your common sense. You are out there and hitting something is not really in your hands, stray container, whale, large floating debris.

Small boats are fine if you patient and wait out the weather.

You may go a bit crazy on a boat alone.

I suggest looking for what ever you can afford to steer your boat for you. Our friends just rigged a stay sail to their tiller and a bungie on the other side. Their boat has crosse3d the atlantic 5 times.

Do your research, take your time, and go for it.
__________________
Life's a dream, live it!


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Small Boat for Solo Sailing rlltrash Seamanship & Navigation 24 03-06-2013 04:22 AM
small offshore boat with decent preformance redstripesailor Boat Review and Purchase Forum 7 11-15-2006 09:31 AM
Offshore Small Keel/Centerboarders wrevans Boat Review and Purchase Forum 3 04-24-2006 11:03 AM
Offshore Small Keel/Centerboarders wrevans Boat Review and Purchase Forum 0 04-22-2006 08:57 PM
Too small for offshore? lee_1999 General Discussion (sailing related) 26 03-13-2002 02:34 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:25 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.