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  #31  
Old 05-08-2013
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

One more question, if people by 60' sailboats, how do they sail them? Do they have a wife who helps out? Or friends who know how to sail and help hoist sails? People buy these bigger boats but how do they use them?
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Old 05-08-2013
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

A sixty footer would require a couple who really know what they are doing or even having full-time paid crew. If you could not be comfortable living on something around 40 feet or even smaller perhaps the condo route is best. Also check out a catamaran as someone suggested. By sailboat standards you get an immense amount of room and twin engines makes handling easier but there is still a big learning curve. Also with a cat if you are at the helm you are a long way from the dock when it comes to getting lines ashore.

Final thought, the 'big bedroom' style of boat tends not to as good if you want to sail long distances as something like the HR. You might also check out new Amels. They are gorgeous boats with lots of space and a ketch rig makes sail handling easier. Expensive though.
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencog View Post
Reading the original post, I get the sense there is more of a desire to BUY something, than to USE something.
Yeah, that's my impression, as well... Frankly, for a full-time liveaboard who desires a 'master bedroom' in a boat of that size, and for whom money is apparently no object, I'd recommend a powerboat... A Sea Ray or Sunseeker would definitely score him plenty more chicks in Miami and South Beach than a Humter, that's for certain... (grin)

I rate the current trend in newbies starting out 40-footers to be a major contributing factor to sailors motoring more while underway, and sailing less... And, for some of the appalling sail trim one so often sees out there...

Learning to sail on boats of such size, it's simply so much more difficult to appreciate the DIFFERENCE that is made by the sort of tweaking of sail controls that are such a part of sailing small boats well, and where the feedback is so much more apparent, and instantaneous...
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Last edited by JonEisberg; 05-08-2013 at 06:52 PM.
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

One thing to think about. Been to Florida, but never lived there, but in the summer, I hear air conditioning is pretty much mandatory. It probaby is not the most fun thing to be cooped up in a sail boat with ac going. A catamaran or power boat with its sliding door and more room would probably work better.

I am with you on moving out of NY. I lived in the north east all my life and getting to a year round warm climate was a great change- one you could probably use. Florida sounds like a great place. I would look into joining a sailing club, and just chartering some big boats for now.
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Networker View Post
Seems if I can learn to dock, i'm in business. Being a passenger on a boat, I assume the only reason I can't dock solo is that I want someone to jump off and put the rope on the hooks and help pull boat in, correct? That's something I can't do alone unless I pull it in perfectly and cut off engine at right time, coast in, etc?

Because I don't know what I don't know yet, it seems like the advice given is that sailing solo is much easier, except when I get into trouble. Then it's life or death. When in trouble, which I assume is too much wind, can't i just drop sails and batten down the hatches? I've read in horrible situations, sailors would cut off sails if need be, and be three sheets to the wind. As a newbie have always wanted to ask that.
They way I dock single handed, I come in next to the pier very slow, reverse engine to stop completely, step off and tie boat at the beam, then stern. Problem is sometime the wind is blowing me off the pier, and there is a boat on other side of me, if boat is to far from pier, I cannot tie her off. And if I just reverse, the prop walk, along with wind blowing bow off can cause the boat to just want to do a 180 deg turn. Docking is like driving a car on black ice- somtimes you have no brakes, cannot steer, and if you give it gas the wheels just spin.

My boat has low free board when compared to say a Hunter, so she is easy to step off. A catamaran or a lot of the new boats are difficult to step off- they have high freeboard to make the cabins bigger. This high freeboard will also catch the wind and push the boat around, making docking even harder.

In a blow, you never want to compeletely drop sails, then you have no control and the boat will swing wildley, best thing to do is hove to if you have sea way and just want or need a break from the action. There are hundreds of books on storm management. But how would you handle a jammed sail halyard alone, in high winds? There are thousands of issues to deal with a think about, and thousands of things that can and will go wrong, but you will need to manage and deal with them.
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

networker,
If money is no object then get a Jeanneau 41DS with "dock and go". Skip the Hunter. While docking you'll embarrass every old salt within a week.

Besides; what's a few dings in the learning process.

ASA 101-104; then hire a local to go out with you to practice and in a month or two you will have it down. You'll find plenty of good sailors to go out on a new boat.

I'd say go for it!! Don't let the naysayers scare you away. 40' is just right. Especially on a modern boat.

2013 Jeanneau 41DS Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

Be fore warned!!! I'm gonna be a grumpy old man like Bob my hero.
1.Motor boats s-ck. Wife was a motorboat liveaboard all her summers as a kid and I did short hop transports on Grand Banks. Noisy,stinky and bouncy even at anchor. With cost of fuel count your pennies if you want to go anywhere. Come on folks this is a sailing forum.
2. Big boats are easier to sail. Hard to really screw up and put in irons and they still go forward pretty good even if badly out of trim. General speaking if you keep all the telltales going aft you go forward. Can learn balance, twist, chord,draft,sag,,slot dynamics later.
3. big boats are harder to dock,moor,maintain and are bigger holes in the ocean for your kitty.
4. Admiral is small ( 4'10") - I got lousy wheels and a gut. Cruising,voyaging and keeping life together while living on a boat is not about strength. It's about temperment and knowledge. Our new boat has bowthrusher and all powered winches.However, never get a boat so big you can't sail it when it all breaks ('cause it will). That seems major reason see alot in the 40-50' range. Still possible to raise strike and reef without powered aid. Remember even if you are testosterone crazed when sailing it's usually more important to be able to get it down then get it up.

In the same line of thinking even if you have fancy heat and AC never get a boat where the natural airflow won't keep you cool and the boat ventilated or can't be buttoned up to keep you warm. Never get a boat where your next drink of life giving water is dependent on a machine working. Never put yourself in a position where getting to your next harbor is dependant on another machine working.

Sorry about that but I feel better now. Thanks for your understanding and kindness.
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Last edited by outbound; 05-08-2013 at 08:17 PM.
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  #38  
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

I am 65 and single hand my 44 footer for about 6 months of the year between Trinidad and St Maarten. I see no problems in what you plan to do with two caveats.

1 - you need a bowthruster to help you dock..

2 - if you are going to be in a marina in Florida in the summer you need some serious AC.
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
Yeah, that's my impression, as well... Frankly, for a full-time liveaboard who desires a 'master bedroom' in a boat of that size, and for whom money is apparently no object, I'd recommend a powerboat... A Sea Ray or Sunseeker would definitely score him plenty more chicks in Miami and South Beach than a Humter, that's for certain... (grin)

I rate the current trend in newbies starting out 40-footers to be a major contributing factor to sailors motoring more while underway, and sailing less... And, for some of the appalling sail trim one so often sees out there...

Learning to sail on boats of such size, it's simply so much more difficult to appreciate the DIFFERENCE that is made by the sort of tweaking of sail controls that are such a part of sailing small boats well, and where the feedback is so much more apparent, and instantaneous...

The overwhelming majority of guys actually leaving the dock and sailing most weekends at my marina are folks on newer coastal cruisers, with comfy spacious berths, often with bow thrusters, in-mast mains, air conditioners and large wide open cockpits. The ones rarely leaving the dock....aren't.

I ain't no expert and I unfortunately didn't grow up sailing small, but I'm on my 'big' boat sailing the Bay most every weekend, April to November.

The OP does not need to get a power boat, simply because he isn't following your path. Different strokes.

Me? Hopefully I'll be out gunkholing. Or visiting a local yacht club.
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Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?

BCC, I don't think the advice about getting a power boat was necessarily bad, nor was it intended to be dismissive. I actually had the same thought when I read the OP's longer description of himself and what he wanted. If you want flash, a big SeaRay would be great. If you want a little more sedate, something like a Grand Banks could be a great option. Now, that kind of room and speed comes with a price - fuel - but if the OP has the cash to buy the fuel, then it's certainly a consideration.

I tend to think that most of the folks like the OP also come here thinking that sailboats go fast. To the OP, please keep in mind, most sailboats don't go much above 7 KTS (roughly 7 MPH). This is inherent because of the design of the hulls - they are displacement hulls, not planing, hulls, and thus physics imposes limitations on them. Catamarans, which tend to be planing hulls, can go fast, but cats have their own issues in a seaway, and they need more space to dock/moor than a mono. Cats tend to be more stable in light to moderate seas than their monohull cousins, but the monos will tend to be more stable in rougher seas. A cat gives you more deck square footage, and maybe more square footage in the cabins too, but as to actual, usable beam below, the mono is going to have you beat. In the OP's case, I'd be a little concerned about the size of the quarters in a cat if he's planning on having "guests" over.

I mean no disrespect to the OP - everyone's needs are different, and different boats work for different people. That being said, as I understand what he wants, he's looking for a boat with a master bedroom, that could be single-handed, and has a nice area for friends to stretch out. That, to me, sounds like a center cockpit monohull. In fact, there are two different types of CC designs, and either one might work. Some, like ChucklesR's Irwin 38 or even an S2 11, have the aft cabin connected to the forward cabin via a hallway, so you don't have to leave the cabin to move about. This can be great for air conditioning purposes, since you can move around to your heart's content without opening any doors/windows. The other style, with the walk-through cockpit, could work too. There's a "master bedroom" that is completely separate from the rest of the cabin, and that leaves a lot of options for how someone in the OP's shoes arranges the boat. You could also heat/cool the cabins separately, which could, at least theoretically, cut some of your energy expenses or requirements. The CC's also have the "beach" on the back - it's a great place to sit, sun, etc. It sounds to me like the OP is, much like me, mostly going to be a fair weather sailor. That means that the chief complaint you hear about CC's - that they hobby-horse - probably won't matter.

Regarding the OP's attraction to the Hunter, you have to understand that you're getting what you pay for with any boat, including the Hunters. I mean no disrespect to the Hunter brand - they are good boats that are perfectly adequate for their intended purposes. And, compared to Catalinas, the other chief rival at that price point, the Hunters look prettier inside. But Hunter builds to a price point. So, they don't always use high-end materials, or high-end equipment. That's not to say the materials and equipment are bad, mind you. It's kind of like a Toyota Corolla versus a Lexus GX. The Corolla's interior is fine, and perfectly adequate for getting you around town, etc.. The materials inside will be fine, and the equipment will work OK, too. But the equipment and materials won't be as refined, or as capable, as in the Lexus. You get what you pay for in both cars, and the same is true with the Hunter (the same is largely true of Catalinas, too). All that being said, if I had the money to buy new, I'd certainly look at the Hunters, so don't get the wrong impression.

To your concern about hurricanes, quite honestly, that's probably not one of the times to go sailing up the river - you'll motor. Unless you want to sail for the fun of it! But if you're doing it to get up river quickly, you'll most likely motor.
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