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-   -   Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/general-discussion-sailing-related/99268-singlehanding-41-hunter-ds.html)

Networker 05-07-2013 07:37 PM

Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
I'm recently single and selling my house. Considering moving to Miami and living on a boat in a nice Marina to save money. Since I'd be living there for 2 years, I'd want a brand new boat that's somewhat large so I can live comfortably, yet not so large that I can't sail it solo. Money isn't an object, rather getting a decent sized boat that I can sail and live on is more my consideration. I can get a 50 or 60' if I wanted, and they look quite livable, but they had 6 and 7 foot drafts which would limit my Keys and Bahamas sailing, and I sincerely doubt anyone can sail it alone?

So, after doing some research, the 2013 Hunter 41' DS looks big enough, has a 'master bedroom,' and a 5' keel so I could do some sailing in Keys and Bahamas. It has a shower, and if I find a nice marina, can pull up to luxury one with pool and facilities.

My question is if the boat is too big to sail on alone if I wanted to?

Thanks for any advice!!

bigdogandy 05-07-2013 07:47 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
Welcome to Sailnet, Networker.

Sailing a 41' boat singlehandedly can be done, but how well it can be done and how safely depends on the skill and experience of the sailor. Unless you have considerable experience getting any boat over 30' or so into and out of a slip singlehanded is going to be a handful in all but the calmest weather.

Networker 05-07-2013 07:54 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
Hi Andy, thanks for your reply. I don't have even a minute of experience on any boat larger than a canoe. Can't sail, but figured I could learn this summer. I was going to take ASA 101-104 lessons this summer, then get a boat this fall. If I can't do it on such a big boat, then its probably better to get a used starter boat and live in an apartment near the water. Or move up north with my friends and family and get some company on weekend trips. Just trying to look at what's realistic vs fantasy at this stage.


Thanks !!

ronspiker 05-07-2013 07:56 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
Like bigdogandy says. Sailing is easy. If you can get the sails up, I'm assuming you are in good health. The issue is going to be getting into and out of your slip. You can get a bow thruster and that would help. The issue that might come up is if it is too hard to sail you won't. You will just sit at the dock and that would be a waste.

rockDAWG 05-07-2013 08:01 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
If money is not anissue, it certainly eliminates most of the problems. Why bother go for a Hunter when you can get a 2013 Hallberg Rassy 412.

Hallberg-Rassy - Yachts - Aft Cockpit Boats

The boat was designed to handled by just one finger and occasionally may be two fingers. Make sure you watch the video :).

msogin 05-07-2013 08:03 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Networker (Post 1026987)
Hi Andy, thanks for your reply. I don't have even a minute of experience on any boat larger than a canoe. Can't sail, but figured I could learn this summer. I was going to take ASA 101-104 lessons this summer, then get a boat this fall. If I can't do it on such a big boat, then its probably better to get a used starter boat and live in an apartment near the water. Or move up north with my friends and family and get some company on weekend trips. Just trying to look at what's realistic vs fantasy at this stage.


Thanks !!

The first large boat I owned was a Beneteau 411. Admittedly I had experience sailing and racing dingy's like Flying Dutchman, Snipes, Lightnings and Thistles, but within a few weeks I was fully comfortable sailing the 411 single handed. In fact I found sailing the 411 to be much easier than any of the small boats that I previously owned. The biggest challenge was picking up a mooring line. If money is no object, buy a boat with a bow thruster to make docking relatively easy. You also will want a furling jib/genoa and furling mainsail. And of course a good autopilot is important.

killarney_sailor 05-07-2013 08:15 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
You might look at a Nonsuch 33 or 36. Very easy to sail since there is only one big sail to handle. Quite beamy so there is lots of room including a shower. Older boats but many have been very well looked after. A good idea to get a bow thruster installed.

Flybyknight 05-07-2013 08:18 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Networker (Post 1026987)
I don't have even a minute of experience on any boat larger than a canoe. Can't sail, but figured I could learn this summer.

If you have to ask the question, I believe in all sincerity and humility that you already have your answer.
Jumping headlong into a "Big Boat" without the years of experience that it takes to become a "Sailor" is not at all recommended.
Charter starting at 25' and sail solo,working your way up to 40+ and I promise you that your perspective will be altered, big time.
Dick
BTW, I'm 77 and have been sailing since age 12.

rockDAWG 05-07-2013 08:20 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Networker (Post 1026987)
Hi Andy, thanks for your reply. I don't have even a minute of experience on any boat larger than a canoe. Can't sail, but figured I could learn this summer. I was going to take ASA 101-104 lessons this summer, then get a boat this fall. If I can't do it on such a big boat, then its probably better to get a used starter boat and live in an apartment near the water. Or move up north with my friends and family and get some company on weekend trips. Just trying to look at what's realistic vs fantasy at this stage.


Thanks !!

If this is the case, why such a rush to buy a boat new or used. Learn to sail and take time to make the right decision. The wind and ocean will be there when you are ready.

YMMV. :)

outbound 05-07-2013 08:26 PM

Re: Singlehanding a 41' Hunter DS?
 
another advantage to learning to sail first is you can make a more informed decision on what you want in a boat. there is a huge spectrum of types of vessels at any given size and cost. depending on what aspects of the sailing life you are drawn to as you learn will have significant impact on what vessel you will choose.


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