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  #11  
Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

Hey, you are fine, you are learning the hard way.

As I have stated several times, the success of a voyage is 80% skipper and 20% vessel. The ability of the skipper is 80% common sense, problem solving and judgment, and 20% experience.

As a result, IMHO, roughly 2/3rds of your voyaging success is the gray matter you bring when you step on the boat, life experience and all. You are now improving that part and building up the 20% experience part. It is important to use some of that gray matter in preparation for the trip, making sure you understand the charts, currents and passage you plan to take rather than winging it in the circumstances. It is a good sign that you did not panic and instead solved the problems that arose.

To read the posts on Sailnet, one would think it is all about buying the right boat and the right gear and taking the right series of ASA courses. Wrong. It is the stuff between your ears. Good job for surviving to keep at it!

A great sailor could sail a Catalina 22 across the Atlantic. A poor sailor could sink a Tayana 37 (or an Island Packet....he, he, he) and need to activate his EPIRB 10 miles offshore.

Last edited by jameswilson29; 05-19-2013 at 12:44 PM.
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  #12  
Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

Panic often comes from being out of control and for some folks, you can resolve that by learning to control the situation.

And we've all probably survived a foolish situation so please don't take this the wrong way, I offer it from the "there but for the grace of god go I" perspective, wondering how we all survived at times.

An engine that runs away, or does run, or simply is ill-tempered, means that you aren't in control of the engine. Either learn to maintain it, or pay someone to maintain it, or get a boat without an engine. This is something you can control.

Running aground outside the channel means you don't know how to navigate. Either you didn't read the chart or you didn't factor in tide rise or something. There are free classes (Power Squadron, USCG Aux) to teach that, and books, and more resources. Again, either you sit down to learn this stuff, or it will be out of control and that leads to panic.

You got stuck and had to wait an hour to find help? Why? With a VHF or a cell phone and a tow policy or a call to the USCG, you could have gotten help. These are all things that you are apparently ignoring and allowing to control you, that you could be controlling.

Boating is something like baking a cake: ANyone can throw stuff in a pan, but the result isn't going to be very good unless you take some time to plan and learn what you're doing. If you just want to mess around with boats, that's absolutely fine and perfectly good fun. Best done in something you can PADDLE on protected waters. Canoeing, kayaking, all fun things that make navigation and engines and tows less of a possible problem.

Although I will confess to running a canoe aground in the middle of a wide river once, in dry season. The guys behind me practically capsized with laughter when they saw me hop out of the back of a canoe, in the middle of a river, and walk on the water for a while before jumping back in and paddling again. (Memo, never walk on water in public, it tends to cause disturbances.)
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  #13  
Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

Oh and BTW, I ran aground 3 times last year, screwed-up a number of times, was scared, tried not to panic at times, solved problems as best I could, learned a lot, and managed to survive for another season. And I have been doing this off and on now for 43 years.

That is why sailing is fun - the challenge.
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Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harborless View Post
Help me regain my confidence sailnet.
Dude, this is the stuff of life. Sh...t happens all the time. From your story it is clear you are not a bonehead and have serious balls. You have not made any truly stupid moves. You are alive and the boat is afloat. The rest is all negotiable.

People here gave you lots of good ideas to try and to check out. Get lots of rest, eat something good, have a drink or two, and then get busy. Celebrate every day and every small victory, heck...celebrate even a defeat when you gave it your best.

Salutations to you, my friend... may the gods be kind to you...
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Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

You dont call the coast guard because you run around in mud. You push the boat off, wait for high tide, or do as i did and hail a passing boat. It was not an emergency just an inconvience. The railroad and bridge were dangerous situations and i did report myself in distress but was able to get out of it.


So i have developed a plan of action. Tmmrw morning will tow the boat or sail if wind to closest marina. Have a diesel mechanic to come out and FIX THE PROBLEM once and for all. While shes holed up ill get a bottom scraping. Once the engine is fixed this whole debacle becomes enjoyable again and a whole lot easier.
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Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

And make sure you are not dragging behind your boat a big chest full of gold... that would explain the incredible drag your boat seems to have...
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  #17  
Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

A really good anchor, ready to go, maybe even in dicey situations rigged so you can release it from the cockpit, can be a nice little bit of insurance.
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Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

After getting the boat checked out as above, I would try to recruit someone who is more experienced than you to help you make the trip. You may find someone who only asks for payment in liquid currency (i.e. beer).

Last edited by weinie; 05-19-2013 at 03:10 PM.
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  #19  
Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

Yeah , the stress level is so high when your motor is sketchy.

Your plan sounds sensible. Everyone has up and downs. You will turn the corner and have some good times after fixing your motor.
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Old 05-19-2013
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Re: My Horror Story

Sounds like a normal weekend to me.

I once handed my wife a boat hook and said "prepare to fend off the bridge abutment" with a completely straight face:

http://sailingfortuitous.com/beach_haven_cruise_2012
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