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  #11  
Old 05-22-2013
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Re: Young people and adventure

At 57 and 55







You just have to keep making time to play between making money and keep some balance in your life BUT that was one steep ass trail
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Old 05-22-2013
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Re: Young people and adventure

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Originally Posted by Frogwatch View Post
I will note that having kids does not stop you from having adventures at all. Our first child did not slow us down at all and made things much more fun. A small child opens doors that you could never do on your own. In fact, travelling with a small child will enable you to meet far more people than anything else. Yes, you travel differently but you sure experience more travelling with a child.
Well said. Seeing the world through a child's eyes is an incredible thing.

I was constantly on adventures as a kid, through boyscouts and trips with my parents. We sailed the atlantic, fished the gulf, hiked mountains,camped, climbed, and more. I work a full-time job, but we are on roadtrips and off sailing, caving, hiking, you name it. I'm 25 and my son is 6 (not traditional, I know). Nothing beats sharing the adventure with him and hearing the way he talks about our adventures afterwards.
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Old 05-22-2013
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Re: Young people and adventure

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Originally Posted by Frogwatch View Post
I also think previous generations did this via joining the military. When I read my 94 yr old dad's journals of his times in the navy I see him learning all about life.

I will note that having kids does not stop you from having adventures at all. Our first child did not slow us down at all and made things much more fun. A small child opens doors that you could never do on your own. In fact, travelling with a small child will enable you to meet far more people than anything else. Yes, you travel differently but you sure experience more travelling with a child.
That's how I did it. I've visited at least 11 different countries, some of them more than once. I've stood on the ice pack at the North Pole.
Some of the adventures I had, don't involve visiting other countries, and are of a classified nature.

Now, I'm master of my own ship, and doing it my way. That's how I want it.
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Old 05-22-2013
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Re: Young people and adventure

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Originally Posted by hillenme View Post
I'm only 29 and I already regret that I settled so quickly. No marriage or kids or anything, but two weeks after college graduation I was sitting in a cubicle as a staff accountant. I thought I was getting a leg-up on my freinds who were having adventures/finding themselves/whatever you want to call it (I was real in to horesback riding at the time and many freinds were bumming around the stable all year for nothing pay). I've turned that soul-sucking daily grind as a grunt accountant into a position as Finance Manager of a mid-size aircraft maintenance company, so I can't be bitter as my hard work paid off and I wouldn't own a 35 foot sailboat in Chicago without this job... But, I definitely have a wanderlust that was never satisfied and the more I meet folks that did it, the more I wish I had. My girlfreind spent over two years after college working on tall ships sailing all over the eastern seaboard. She's 32 and spent this winter in chemo and radiation for breast cancer and it gave us both a new outlook on life. We're reminded that we're still very young, but that "when I retire" is so far away and we have no gaurantee of making it that long, let alone being healthy enough for adventure. We hope to move aboard in the Carribbean for an extended time in fall of 2014 - giving us two summers here to save some more money, get married, and get comfortable with boat ownership/maintenance (our current boat is giving me daily reminders of how much work it takes and how little I know, despite learning a lot in the off-seasons when sailing others' boats over the years.) I say kudos to anyone seaking adventure in their 20's - it's such an awesome time in your life, it has been for me, but as I come to the end of them I realize that it was also a time of great freedom and self-discovery that I may not have fully capitalized on...
This sounds almost exactly like my wife and myself, right down to the plan and timing. I'm 29 (going to be 30 in just under a month), my wife is almost 28. I'm an engineer with a good job here in Indianapolis...been at it for coming up on 7 years. My wife teaches at a college downtown. We (and especially I, but my wife does too) look at my little brother who just turned 22 and what he is currently doing with his life/what he has done since he graduated high school (went to Alaska, worked on a salmon boat and bummed around up there) and now works at a guest ranch in Colorado) and are more than a bit jealous. Sure, we have more money than he does, but as I (rhetorically) asked my wife yesterday "Do you want to do what we are dong now, sacrificing fun and time for money, or sacrifice money for time and fun?" Both of us are starting to lean heavily towards sacrificing money for time and fun. We are currently taking baby steps in that direction, as we just purchased a 26' boat that we are learning to sail on our local reservoir that is literally 15 minutes from where I work, looking at taking some ASA classes in the islands this winter to proverbially "dip our toes in the water" of liveaboard cruising down there, and are starting to plan out how we can make "going off the grid to cruise the world" financially work. Right now we are planning to stick around here until at least the end of the summer 2014 (mostly so that my wife's 401(k) will vest...no reason to give up a good chunk of money when we aren't really ready yet anyway), at which point we plan to start the process of divesting ourselves of our extraneous possessions (house, truck, current boat, etc.) and looking for a boat to live aboard somewhere on the east coast or Great Lakes and then work our way down to the islands. Long story short: Hillenme: hopefully we'll see you down there and/or around here (midwest/great lakes) in the next few years! Can I get a big HOO RAH for adventure!? Life is too short...

edited to add: While I did get married relatively early by our generation's standards (24), and that probably did hold me back from adventures for a few years, as we tried to live the "American Dream" and build a middle class life here in the midwest, I am fortunate in that my wife is on board with needing to get out and have adventures and chaffing under the 8-5 routine of a job, and the fact that we have not had kids yet (haven't decided whether or not we will...just makes planning an adventure that much easier without that variable to throw in).

Last edited by Rhys05; 05-22-2013 at 01:28 PM.
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Old 05-22-2013
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Re: Young people and adventure

It's hard to find a balance because to fully commit to either path:

The I'm young and sailing around the world on a shoestring
Vs
I'm young and I'm going to get a regular job in a moderate to bad part of the country, buy a house, have kids, get married(in whatever order) and retire in Florida.

You have to spend all your energy and focus to make either work.

The best balance I can think of is to get a job in something you like, like marine biology and love somewhere cool usin your marine biology degree like Hawaii or Monterey and sometimes be sent on field trips to study indifferent countries. You can own a sailboat where you live and race and take some time off in the summer. You would still have I make comprimises and you definitely coundnt have kids, but I think it would be a life without regret.

We are sailors here, we don't have to work as an accountant! If you want adventures there are some adventurous jobs out there. Or at least there are really good places where you can apply your accounting degree. Having lived in both Chicago(my brother went to Northwestern and I lived for two years on north and clybourn.). I went to college in Hawaii. He got the better degree from the better school and even a lot of good job offers couldn't get him to stay in that place. So what I'm saying is Hawaii is hiing accountants too. So is San Diego and San Francisco. Work there. You can still sail all the time.

Last edited by northoceanbeach; 05-22-2013 at 01:27 PM.
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Old 05-22-2013
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Re: Young people and adventure

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Originally Posted by Frogwatch View Post
I think early 20s is a unique window of opportunity when ones brain is still malleable to profit most from new experiences and most of society is more ready to forgive your "errors". Things that seem cute when young people do them seem creepy when us older types do them. Consider a young guy hanging out in a hostel to an older guy doing the same. My gut reaction to the young guy is "ok, your figuring out what you should do in life" but to the older guy it is "You havent figured it out YET and now your hanging out with the kids sorta sucking the youthful energy out like some sort of aged vampire".
I'm not sure what I'm supposed to have figured out by now. Maybe you can let me know .

I haven't done the hostel thing in a while, but I am still taking university undergrad courses. I'm easily the age of my classmates' fathers, and usually older the my profs. My classmates don't seem to care one way or another once they realize I'm not their prof.

Seriously though, I understand what you're saying. And I agree that our culture makes it a lot easier to be adventurous when you're young. But it doesn't have to be that way. It's about choices.
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Re: Young people and adventure

My daughter and her BF spent 6 months travelling in Europe doing something called HelpX where they stayed places for free and often got meals but no pay in exchange for doing work. Then theycame back and worked for 12 months saving to go to AU where they eventually got very high paying jobs in a very remote mining town (Newman) where they have been for the past year. They intend to leave within 6 months, travel in SE Asia and then come home. Almost wish I was young again.
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Old 05-22-2013
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Re: Young people and adventure

My wife and I were living the American dream. Good paying professional careers, nice house in the country, nice cars, boats, etc. We are in our mid 40s and people our age that we know keep getting sick and some dying around us. In 2010 we dumped most all of our assets and possessions in favor of a good boat to take us anywhere in the world. We still have our retirement accounts. We no longer buy the latest gadgets, cars, etc. We do like to keep our bikes current because we spend a lot of time biking and it keeps us healthy. But we have been biding our time for the last 3 years saving every penny to put towards our first retirement.

We are definitely trading money for professional freedom and we have no regrets. I think our timing is perfect. I have lived a healthy and happy life working in my career over 25 years but now it is time to go see the world.

Once we leave we have no idea where we might end up or what we may be doing. We will figure that out when we get there.
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Re: Young people and adventure

One of the oddest things I have noticed is how much having kids teaches you and how your entire focus changes and YOU WANT IT TO HAPPEN. Used to be obsessed with having adventures but then slowly I became obsessed with the kids doing adventures and it pleases me to see them talk about doing cool stuff.
As young people, my wife and I were obsessive cavers but it is hard to do it as you get older, (it ruins you knees) but the kids became interested and now my youngest daughter is insane about it. It was the greatest thing to teach her rapelling and she pores over maps and practices climbing. So great to watch.
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Re: Young people and adventure

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim R. View Post
My wife and I were living the American dream. Good paying professional careers, nice house in the country, nice cars, boats, etc. We are in our mid 40s and people our age that we know keep getting sick and some dying around us. In 2010 we dumped most all of our assets and possessions in favor of a good boat to take us anywhere in the world. We still have our retirement accounts. We no longer buy the latest gadgets, cars, etc. We do like to keep our bikes current because we spend a lot of time biking and it keeps us healthy. But we have been biding our time for the last 3 years saving every penny to put towards our first retirement.

We are definitely trading money for professional freedom and we have no regrets. I think our timing is perfect. I have lived a healthy and happy life working in my career over 25 years but now it is time to go see the world.

Once we leave we have no idea where we might end up or what we may be doing. We will figure that out when we get there.
Maybe we'll see you there Tim ... where ever "there" is. Our plans are to head off next spring, make our way through the Great Lakes, then out the St. Lawrence, and eventually hang a right down to the Caribbean. We may hang around the Maritimes if money allows. Who knows...

We will leave with a good boat, decent personal skills, and a small savings account. We'll figure out the rest ... or we won't. Either way, it's gonna be interesting.
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