Chain plates - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Boat Builders Row > Grampian
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 08-13-2013
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 8
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Ruthlessrider is on a distinguished road
Re: Chain plates

According to most of the internet information out there, they indicate that the chainplate is attached to a member of the hull superstructure.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 08-13-2013
davidpm's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Madison
Posts: 3,485
Thanks: 130
Thanked 33 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 7
davidpm is on a distinguished road
Re: Chain plates

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthlessrider View Post
OK, I don't claim to be all that knowledgable on marine terminology, so just to make sure I know what everyone is talking about, can someone define bulkhead, please? To me a bulkhead is a walled barrier between compartments, such as the barrier between the head and the V-berth. The chain plate seems to be not anchored to the bulkhead, but to one of the boats ribs (my term). So the boat would have a wooden rib helping to form the plane of the hull, sandwiched by the chain plate, covered by epoxyed fiberglass. Wrong?
Your definition of bulkhead is fine.

I can't make out what the rib is that you are talking about but it don't matter much. One way or another you have to chop out rotten stuff and replace it. Working with epoxy is well documented in the west systems site.
If you put it back together with solid wood and epoxy and do the 8 to 1 bevel it you want to do any patches it should be as strong as new.

I wouldn't do anything like this myself without at least having one book.

This is good one.

Amazon.com: Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual: Including Inspecting the Aging Sailboat, Sailboat Hull and Deck Repair, Sailboat Refinishing, Sailbo (9780071462846): Don Casey: Books Amazon.com: Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual: Including Inspecting the Aging Sailboat, Sailboat Hull and Deck Repair, Sailboat Refinishing, Sailbo (9780071462846): Don Casey: Books



If you don't know about this stuff you can do something that will make sense at the time but will cause the repair to fail, and you may not be so lucky the second time.
__________________
The lesson from the Icarus story is not about human failing.
It is a lesson about the limitations of wax as an adhesive.
If you have an engineering problem solve it.

Last edited by davidpm; 08-13-2013 at 04:53 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 08-16-2013
KnottyGurl's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Picton, ON
Posts: 165
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
KnottyGurl is on a distinguished road
Re: Chain plates

cut out the old peice of wood covered in glass as best and intact as possible, this will be used as a template.
then using cardboard from a box make a second template that is cut to fit what you have left from your cut.
you will have to sand/grind some wood and glass back and attempt to make as flush as possible.
when you are satisfied with card board template then transpose onto a marine grade plywood and cut new piece
put a layer of matting up on glass section and extend at least 18 inches on both sides of new board, snug board in at same time so it is fitted into place.
with another matting lay along first layer and then cover wood on each side but do not wrap over end come to an inch of end, then cut where needed to make fitting tight at hull side on both sides of the plate.
next take a tight weave cloth and in smaller sections fold into corner extending to end and 10 inches along hull 6 more layers will work and each one on hull should be 2 inches shorter.
then p-lace the last of the cloth over the whole repair to cover andhelp when you fair it out
grab a can of structure filler and fair out all
place plate and with sharpie mark holes, drill
re bolt plate and locktight with blue.
should be as good or better then new
repaint if needed and Bob's your uncle
__________________
Sailing The Great Lakes in my "Bluewater" Grampian 26

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by KnottyGurl; 08-16-2013 at 01:14 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
chain plates Bob142 General Discussion (sailing related) 8 06-14-2012 01:33 AM
Chain Plates eherlihy O'Day 11 03-28-2011 07:17 AM
chain plates amblin909 Announcements, Suggestions Box and Site Issues 2 12-10-2009 06:09 PM
Chain plates are out, now what? jrd22 Gear & Maintenance 11 12-30-2007 11:06 AM
Any advice on chain plates? sailphoto Gear & Maintenance 6 08-20-2006 06:02 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:30 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012