Must Haves On Board? - Page 13 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > herSailNet
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #121  
Old 01-27-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Ready2go is on a distinguished road
I am currently also thinking about what to take this fall when we go. To prepare, I am paying extra attention to what I use and don't use. Since we will be either selling or renting the house, I am packing away items that I do not use very often. This will lighten the packing load and less items in the cupboards makes the house look less cluttered and more spacious for sale. I am meticulously labeling the boxes "just incase" there is something that I find I cannot live without. Do I really need that bundt pan and 7 skillets? I am only putting on the boat the very basics that I use regularly to see how storage goes. Then I can add to this if needed. I hear it's much easier to start with less than to take away later. I know full time cruising is different than weekend or holiday sailing. I will be baking bread and cakes and I will need more kitchen items than before. Now, if I can just convince my husband I need more storage space...... Maybe I can convince the kids that they are getting too old for toys....hmmmmm.....
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #122  
Old 01-27-2009
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 106 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
From my experience...

You will find many things that you use, and many that you do not. If an item can have multiple uses, it is better than items that have single uses.

I would also tell you to make every effort to go comfortable. Take your nice silverware and at least 2 nice wine glasses (4 if you have room... for guests_. Don't overkill pretending to throw large parties, but do take at least one snack tray. You will entertain a lot more than you think (we entertained more as LA's than we did when we lived in a house!!!). I would stongly urge you to look into the nesting cookware. It is expensive, I won't lie. But it is one of the best things we have purchased. Pots and pans take up a huge amount of room!! We have also always bought the marine-type, no sliding plates. There is a long thread somewhere about this. In the end, you can probably do without them. However, the cockpit table and the asalon tables tend to be a bit slick and these plates have a tendency to travel. You will never sit down to a nice meal while underway... (foogetaboutit!!). However, the boat will rock at anchor everytime an idiot sportfish goes by. That is when the plates seem to be most helpful. I will also say that we have had a bad experience with the Corian(sp??) cookware. We are down to one plate left. The only stuff that has really stood the time for us were the marine plates/bowls. I hate drinking out of anything other than a cermaic mug... so we don't use the matching cups. I also have a nice selection of "TacoBell" cups. They are great for the boat becuase you can take them with you and if you lose them or break them, it is no worry. However, unlike a dixie cup, they do not break very easily.

Other things we take/do:
  • Cast Iron skillet (one).
  • Toaster (you can get by without it by using a campfire toaster device... but we found after a while it was too much trouble).
  • Extra Blankets. Put them in a pillow case and you can leave them out as decoration. Keeps you from taking up space in storage and it looks nice.
  • Phenegran in suppositories and scope patches. Also keep a nice triple antibiotic easily available and regular old bandaids.
  • Good set of knives.
  • Bread Machine (if you have room).
  • Pressure Cooker (almost mandatory).
  • Lots of coloring books and crayons.
  • Lots and lots of books.

I will try to come up with some more things later.

Brian
__________________
Sailnet Moderator



1987 Tayana Vancouver 42, Credendo Vides, (Mom and Pops boat, F/T Mobile Live Aboards in Puget Sound)

My Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow My Blog at:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow me on Facebook:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #123  
Old 01-27-2009
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: subject to change
Posts: 1,264
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eryka is on a distinguished road
When we first moved aboard, I had all these fantasies of what our lives would be like, I thought I had seriously downsized but I still managed to bring a hot-air popcorn popper and a fresh pasta machine <*blush*> Never used 'em, couldn't afford the space or the power, got rid of 'em. I like Brian's suggestions, they're mostly right on, and I continue to be grateful that he talked me into a set of pricey nesting cookware - even if he is weird about drinking out of plastic glasses.

That said, I don't think you can "downsize" yourself from a house to a boat, at least not by the method of removing things you don't use often. You need a more drastic approach to selecting the things you can't possibly live without. When we had our kitchen design business and clients asked about storage, Dan would suggest they take *everything* out of the cabinets and put it in boxes in another room. Then live your normal life. Every time you need something to cook with, just go to the box and get it, use it, then put it away in the kitchen. Occaisionally, the hassle factor of digging something else out of the box will lead you to do without or improvise from another tool, that's okay. After a month or so, you'll have a very good set of kitchen tools that you use often and need. Then, with the exception of seasonal stuff, give away everything still in the boxes.

After 6+ years of living aboard, here's what's in my galley. Our boat is a 33' we joke it has comfortable room for drinks for 6, dinner for 4, sleeps 2:
6 acrylic wineglasses
6 insulated tumblers
4 platters (dinner or they double as serving platters for snacks)
4 extra-deep soup/stew bowls (only fill them halfway so you don't get soup in your lap in bouncy anchorages) (also, they double for serving dishes for nuts or pretzels)
silverware for 4
good knives: chef's knife, bread knife, small paring knife
Melitta coffee filter and thermos
veggie peeler
hand-held potato masher
zester
large & small microplane cheese graters
wood spoon, 2 plastic spatulas, plastic fork, soup ladle
whisk
can opener
corkscrew
measuring cups & spoons
hand-held eggbeater
kabob skewers
blender
set of 4 nesting pots
pressure cooker
colander
large saute pan
small skillet
teakettle
bread bowl (doubles as serving bowl)
broiling pan for fish
2 toaster-oven size cookie sheets
pie dish
casserole
pineapple corer
4 small bread pans
Soda Club machine

Last edited by eryka; 01-27-2009 at 07:35 PM. Reason: I forgot a few items
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #124  
Old 01-27-2009
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 106 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Good post, Eryka. I forgot about the thermos. Big, big necessity. Great for keeping things hot and cold on the long watches and for coffee.

Reminds me, we bought a new coffee maker for the boat: one of those that makes the coffee that goes directly into a thermos, then shuts off. It works pretty well (as long as the thermos top does not get clogged with coffee grinds). It is a boaters dream because your coffee stays warm and does not use power. Coffee makers pull about 70-80 a/h, which makes them super power drains. No reason to leave it on now to keep warm coffee.

Also, we found a microwave one of the best ways to heat stuff up. Make sure you have a microwave (T37 chef will be here any moment to laugh at me!!!).

Brian
__________________
Sailnet Moderator



1987 Tayana Vancouver 42, Credendo Vides, (Mom and Pops boat, F/T Mobile Live Aboards in Puget Sound)

My Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow My Blog at:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow me on Facebook:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #125  
Old 01-27-2009
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: subject to change
Posts: 1,264
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eryka is on a distinguished road
(holds up both hands and wiggles fingers) Hey, Brian, this is my bread machine!

We had one of those coffee makers also when we lived on land, and loved it. Now, we just make coffee through the Melitta the night before, put it in the thermos, and it's hot and ready when the alarm clock goes off a oh-dark-thirty on work days.

When are you going to post about barbeque grills?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #126  
Old 01-27-2009
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 106 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by eryka View Post
(holds up both hands and wiggles fingers) Hey, Brian, this is my bread machine!

We had one of those coffee makers also when we lived on land, and loved it. Now, we just make coffee through the Melitta the night before, put it in the thermos, and it's hot and ready when the alarm clock goes off a oh-dark-thirty on work days.

When are you going to post about barbeque grills?
HEHE! I actually feel a bbq is a necessity - but peoploe will make fun of me for it. But it does give you a backup and more importantly, when in the tropics, it is nice to bea able to cook outside instead of heating up the baot.

Thave you tried a bread machine?? Good stuff. It saves a lot of things, including the time to make it and watch it. I do not consider it a neccessity, at all - but a nice luxury.

I think the coffee pot works good, but we have a problem with a ground getting stuck in it every once in a while. Other than that, it is great. We used to use a bodum (a glass container that you pour hot water into and mix with grounds and it strains it). It is a great solution for those with limited power and space options. You can then pour into a thermos.

I will try and think of some more tricks. The only other necessity is: SUntan oil/block and bug spray. The further south you go, the more the noseeums thrive on fresh yankees!!! DOn't be the next victim!! (smile)

Brian

PS I heard they are really attracted to yellow boats...
__________________
Sailnet Moderator



1987 Tayana Vancouver 42, Credendo Vides, (Mom and Pops boat, F/T Mobile Live Aboards in Puget Sound)

My Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow My Blog at:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow me on Facebook:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #127  
Old 01-27-2009
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: subject to change
Posts: 1,264
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eryka is on a distinguished road
OOps, went back and edited my list above to add a couple of things. I have a pretty good memory for things in my galley but forgot: manual can opener, corkscrew, colander, pie dish, casserole. Hmm, since I didn't remember I had them, I must not use them very much, so by my own logic, should I now jettison those items?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #128  
Old 01-27-2009
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: subject to change
Posts: 1,264
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eryka is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad View Post
HEHE! I actually feel a bbq is a necessity - but peoploe will make fun of me for it. But it does give you a backup and more importantly, when in the tropics, it is nice to bea able to cook outside instead of heating up the baot.
True story: a friend of ours had a couple of guests aboard, they were anchored off some pristine beach in the USVIs and he was grilling some primo steaks on the bbq. Just as the steaks were nearing perfection, a sea bird swooped down, snatched one of the steaks, and then because it was hot, dropped it into the sea. THAT would never happen with an oven!

My friend never used his bbq again; it wasn't even on the boat next time we saw him.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #129  
Old 01-27-2009
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
That's why you're supposed to grill with the lid closed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eryka View Post
True story: a friend of ours had a couple of guests aboard, they were anchored off some pristine beach in the USVIs and he was grilling some primo steaks on the bbq. Just as the steaks were nearing perfection, a sea bird swooped down, snatched one of the steaks, and then because it was hot, dropped it into the sea. THAT would never happen with an oven!

My friend never used his bbq again; it wasn't even on the boat next time we saw him.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #130  
Old 01-27-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 21
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
leslieowen is on a distinguished road
Great Ideas!

Wow, I thought I was pretty well prepared but I do not have a colander but it appears there is a foldable one??? How does it stand up? Who sells it? I have not had one aboard as all I was familiar with were the large bowls w/holes.

Though my love of frozen Long Island Ice Tea's is known far and wide, I don't have a blender. Also no toaster, no suppositories and no bread machine.

Does anyone have any experience using a baking stone aboard??? I would think it may help stabilize the heat in the oven, provide support for those rubber baking pans and could be used to keep items you take out of oven warm. Some folks call them pizza stones. I have never used one and don't know if the weight, breakability and application would be worthwhile.

cheers,

Leslie
S/V "Tango"
Kent Island, MD
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can Be a Big Job - Support Board Freesail99 Gear & Maintenance 17 06-13-2007 12:32 PM
Fire on Board! Don Casey Seamanship Articles 0 07-14-2003 08:00 PM
Electrical Power on Board Kevin Jeffrey Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 02-11-2003 07:00 PM
On Board Tool Kits Mark Matthews Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 03-06-2002 07:00 PM
Cardiac Emergencies on Board William Mahaffy Seamanship Articles 0 05-03-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:49 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.