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post #21 of 66 Old 11-20-2011 Thread Starter
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Great advice - thanks!
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post #22 of 66 Old 11-20-2011
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I would suggest taking an off shore passage making course, where you are onboard without sight of land for days. You will become more qualified for your vision and know better if the reality is in line with your dream.

I also offer a question for you to ask yourself. No need to rely. Are you more drawn to the sea or looking to get away from land. Successful cruisers come from the former. Runaways are often disenchanted that it isn't all beaches and umbrellas.


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post #23 of 66 Old 11-20-2011 Thread Starter
Take me away!
 
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I've always loved being on the boat and on the water. I now have to freedom to do that. I want to spend the rest of my life obtaining experiences, not objects.

What about crewing on another boat? I thought that doing that for a year would give great real experience. I'm sure it all depends on the captain and other crew. Any suggestions for that route?
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post #24 of 66 Old 11-20-2011
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Crewing on another boat is a great idea to start... perhaps try to line up a relatively short, but several day passage with a suitable candidate..... but that's the big challenge.

These kinds of connections are, esp nowadays, just another 'internet hookup' and what's worse is you may end up isolated at sea with a total whack job and have no escape. So you need to be very careful in that regard.

Buying a ticket to some place like Antigua or some of the other cruiser hangouts and get known locally, try to do some short island hops to get some experience, these are mainly day trips and you can feel your way into the lifestyle. These are generally friendly places, esp amongst the cruising community, and before long you'll have a reputation that will hopefully lead to something more long term.

After a few weeks/months of that you'll have a much better idea of what sort of boat suits you/ that you can afford/ that you actually need etc.

By all means give it a go.. many people 'wait for the right time' and end up losing out.
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post #25 of 66 Old 11-20-2011
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Whatever doesn't piss you off in this forum will make you a better sailor. Or something like that.

I found that keeping a notebook helps me. I write down things I come across that I think are important to know (even if later, once I know more, it turns out to be crap), questions I have so I can ask later, and resources I don't want to forget.

Nothing beats actual experience on a boat, but until then reading, asking questions and taking every sailing and boating class that you can (weather, navigation, offshore passage making as Minnewaska mentioned), will help you reach your goal and you'll encounter fewer surprises along the way.

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post #26 of 66 Old 11-20-2011
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More advice from a guy - please forgive me....

A lady I know is in a similar position. Her strategy is to buy a smaller boat - Santana 22 - and learn all she can with it, doing all maintenance, repairs, upgrades, learning to sail solo (and with others). Make mistakes in a small, comfy environment, where the cost of mistakes - both financial and in terms of consequences - are less. She also crews on larger boats for the experience.

After 12-24 months she plans trade up to a bigger boat; perhaps directly to the 34' Blue Water boat which is her ultimate desire. By then she will know what to look for, and be ready to take it on more challenges....

This seems to me to be a good way forward.

As a starter, most local yacht clubs have informal "beer can" races. This can be a great way to build up experience, see different boats, and find people who will be willing to help make your dream a reality. You may want to try that.

Crewing on another boat will certainly teach you how to sail - but owning (skippering) your own boat has a raft of challenges that you can only truly understand when the boat is yours! It feels totally different being a crewmember than an owner. You think about many different things - and in a different way.

Good luck, and keep the dream alive.
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post #27 of 66 Old 11-20-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paul323 View Post
More advice from a guy - please forgive me....

A lady I know is in a similar position. Her strategy is to buy a smaller boat - Santana 22 - and learn all she can with it, doing all maintenance, repairs, upgrades, learning to sail solo (and with others). Make mistakes in a small, comfy environment, where the cost of mistakes - both financial and in terms of consequences - are less. She also crews on larger boats for the experience.
I did the same thing. I bought a 22' boat that I knew would at least float. It had everything I needed to learn how to sail, but I wanted to teach myself how to do fiberglass repair, hull and deck painting, bright work, rigging, etc. and not on a boat that cost a lot of money. I'm glad I did it.

Donna


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post #28 of 66 Old 11-20-2011
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We also started with a smaller, simpler boat. It was great for learning how to sail, and how to live together in a tiny space. For learning systems? Not so much; that small boat didn't have a stove, hot water shower, fridge, heat, autopilot, windlass, etc etc.

I'd support the idea of a liveaboard learn-to-cruise vacation if you can afford it - lots of knowledge and a great chance to test the lifestyle. I'm less sanguine about crewing on a raceboat. Primarily, because when you're racing, you are trying to sail fast and willing to accept a certain level of risk/wear and tear to the equipment, and discomfort to the crew and the point of sail. When you're cruising, your comfort is weighted much higher and your whole style is different. You may go slower, or motor to a destination. And it'll be a different kind of boat, again, a lot more systems.

We saw a surprising number of "HuntAlinaTeaus" (the modern, almost interchangeable-looking production boats, not traditional bluewater boats) in the Bahamas and Virgins. So if that's the area you're thinking, you might be okay with that type of boat; you don't need the super-rugged ocean-crossing vessel. Really, you've only got a couple days passage at most, so you're not sailing out of the range of the weather report, and if you pick your weather carefully you can do it in a range of boats. My point is not to worry so much about getting the ultimate boat right off the bat, get a boat for now, and you can change to a more oceangoing one later on if your dreams send you across the pacific, say.

Don't know if that helps much, but welcome, anyway.


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post #29 of 66 Old 11-20-2011
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I became a memeber because of your post :)

You are doing exactly what I am planning on doing some time next year. (almost done with my boat). Your post made me feel good. Looks like I am not the only one done with this circus around. I hope you find the right person/crew to fullfill your dream. If I were you - I wouldn't waste time and money on a boat ( I made that mistake). Just find someone you are comfortable with for a leg or two and the rest will follow naturally. Because of work on my boat I have made new friends - I could be in Hawaii or Mexico now without all this work. I was offered money just to look after a boat some time ago or asked to participate in a trip from San Francisco to Carribbean. You will attract the right crowd - I think you are doing it.
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post #30 of 66 Old 11-21-2011
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"I wouldn't waste time and money on a boat"

Robert,
So what you are saying is that once you get to know the people and get in with the sailing crowd, there will be offers to crew and care for boats, so purchase isn't necessary?
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