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Old 03-01-2012
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Galley Safety Bar

As I contemplate my next boat, I have been thinking about the galley safety bar usually found in front of the stove/oven on most boats. A few questions come to mind.
1. What is the real purpose of this bar?
a. Something to hold onto when underway while cooking?
b. Clip in with harness and if so what kind of harness?

On my last sail on my current boat, 06 Hunter 36, with the boat heeled over 25 degrees and moderate chop, I tried to make lunch for the crew. It was tough. I tried clipping in the safety bar with my normal harness. I found it impeded my movements to much to get things and use the counter space lateral to the safety bar. In other words it didn't work to well. So any thoughts would be appreciated.
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Old 03-01-2012
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The safety bar is for holding onto and potentially for clipping oneself on with a harness; some pundits recommend that the cook wears full foul-weather gear with a harness while cooking in heavy weather but I feel that when weather is that bad nobody wants to cook or eat. It is a good grab-bar and keeps the cook from hitting the stove as well, which might upset pots and cause burns.

I'd certainly keep it rather than remove it.
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Old 03-01-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Melrna View Post
As I contemplate my next boat, I have been thinking about the galley safety bar usually found in front of the stove/oven on most boats. A few questions come to mind.
1. What is the real purpose of this bar?
a. Something to hold onto when underway while cooking?
b. Clip in with harness and if so what kind of harness?
I'll break my self-imposed rule of not intruding on herSailNet for this one as I am the cook (and sometime chef) on Auspicious.

The principle function of the bar is to keep a person from being thrown against the cooker and causing the gimbal to swing, dumping whatever is on the cooktop (and potentially the oven if you haven't locked the door) on the sole and perhaps the person.

The secondary function is as a handhold.

I have yet to see a boat where the bar is useful for clipping to. Some people do put eyebolts in the galley to clip to but I prefer to wedge myself in. If something bad happens I want to be able to get away from the galley. *grin*

In the J-shaped galley on Auspicious I have cooked in conditions to full storm. I've had one other crew member able to do the same. Generally crew find a place to put themselves offwatch when things get bumpy and I feed them. *grin*
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Old 03-01-2012
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Old 03-01-2012
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I would never clip in next to a flame or boil temp liquid or fry grease, etc.

However, I would never cook in a storm or any condition where clipping in might be helpful anyway. I keep preprared food for those times, its just too risky for me. Boiled hot water in a thermos will last a long time if you know you are heading into a stink. Running the genset to power the microwave for 3 mins is also much safer, if available.
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We have a bum-strap that clips to eyes on either side of the stove. You can brace yourself with your feet and the strap behind your bum to work on the stove or on the shelf that comes down over the stove. Works pretty well.
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Old 03-01-2012
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The problem with a bum strap is getting away from the cooker if things go pear shaped.
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Old 03-08-2012
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Re: Galley Safety Bar

We've got a U-shaped galley, so I can put my toes on the locker under the range and lean my butt against the opposite side of the galley to wedge myself in, instead of clicking myself in. Frankly, if its too rough for that, I'm not going to be cooking anyway. Just a thermos or teakettle of hot water for drinks, and cold food that can be eaten with one hand (cheese sandwich, maybe) until the weather passes.
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