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twagg7 03-24-2004 03:54 AM

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I am recently married and my husband and I are anxiously awaiting to learn how to sail. However, we are finding it deficult as looking around to all the schools and instructors we would have to be from money to learn. We are both fasinated and eager to learn and get out on the open waters but don''t seem to have the money to do so. Does anyone out there have any ideas as to how to get on the water but not require a lot of money. We have already limited our selves to a small studio behind a garage, but between work and bills we have no time or money. HEEELLLPPP any idea''s or tips that might help us see our dreams come true.

DuaneIsing 03-24-2004 04:31 AM

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twagg7,

You didn''t say where you live. If it''s close to places where sailors sail their boats, the obvious answer is to find these place and ingratiate yourselves to someone (or several) who will share the knowledge. If you cannot afford to pay anyone, this is one of your only options, I would think.

You also mention having no time left. How will you make time for the lessons?

Good luck. Perhaps someone else can be more helpful.

bluepearl 03-24-2004 06:47 AM

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You HAVE to have time. Sailing is not something you learn in one sitting. Look around where sailboats are kept in your localle and, if need be, put up "Want To Crew " notices there. Be honest about your lack of experience. Lots of times you will find someone willing to take newbies out for a sail.
If in SF area, try Cal Sailing Club in Berkeley where you can join and get very low cost instruction and use of dinghies and daysailors.

Good Luck

Denece

twagg7 03-25-2004 04:15 AM

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Thanks a bunch for the responces. I live in Northern Californa 2 hrs. north of Sacramento. The lack of time is ''cause of the working to save the money for the lessons. If it wasn''t so expensive I wouldn''t have to work so much. I know it will take time to learn and as much as I love the ocean and everything it has to offer I am willing to do anything to get out there. We are moving to the Portland, OR area which has a place to learn maybe I should look into getting a job at the place to get in and start getting familiar. THANK YOU again. If there are any more idea''s out there let me know. I can''t tell you all how much I love this web site and being able to chat with real women and sailors out there that get to do this all the time. It is a really helpful and comforting. THANKS

COOLAIR 04-20-2004 02:46 PM

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GO BY AND VISIT YOUR LOCAL SAILING OR YACHT CLUBS AND CHECK THERE MESSAGE BOARDS FOR A USED SUNFISH. SOME OF THESE SMALL SAILING CLUB ARE VERY INEXSPENSE TO JOIN. AND IT WOULD PUT YOU IN TOUCH WITH THE LOCAL SAILING COMMUNITY AND IN MAKING NEW FRIENDS,ALSO SOME OF THESES NEW FRIENDS MAY HAVE LARGER BOATS . RR_/)"COOL AIR"

murlon1 06-07-2004 01:25 PM

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I have redone my teakdecks with West Marine black Multicaulk. After a few months it is now giving off a sooty, black substance which soils sails, clothes , and other sailing equipment. Has anyone else had this problem with this material when it sits outside for a period of time???

LuckyinLA 07-15-2004 06:24 AM

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I''m a little confused by what you say you want. Lessons are good, but would need to be built upon by lots of practice (fun) and actual experience. Sailing and boating can be dangerous and there is a LOT to learn. At 38 y/o I bought myself a 1969 full keel 23'' sloop. I did not know how to sail. That was one year ago. I took a 2 day class (sort of worthless), and have managed to find a friend of a friend, and some other folks, to take me out and teach me stuff. It is hard to find these folks, but serendipity happens. I would recommend you consider buying a small (19 to 24'') boat and take it out in protected waters to learn in conjunction with lessons. There is nothing like experience for experience. HTH

lexxy 07-20-2004 04:01 PM

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We started your way...we never took lessons...we read the general rules of behavior and physics and made the commitment and bought a boat and figured out the rest on our own with lots of common sense and observation and questions to others and reading magazines...first we had a catamarand, then 4 years later we got a Cal 25 we had 17 years and now we live aboard an Island Packet 380...so we have
moved on up and taking on the ocean now.

If you really are serious you will make it happen and quit talking about it. That never got anybody out on the water!! Just don''t risk anyone elses life until you know what you are doing!!! And use all the safety stuff.

I wonder how many times we took that cat out and forgot to put in the plugs until we were half sunk!!! We tipped over the first day and it was uphill from there. We lost anchors, ran aground, let the main halyard go up the mast, backwinded the jib, acci-tacked, and acci-jibbed all the time before we learned....what a laugh to remember...but we didn''t put anyone in danger...kept our distance...just clumsy!!!

Experience is the best teacher!!!

Lexxy on Cyan ...in FLA for now


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