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  #11  
Old 04-17-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

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Originally Posted by Siamese View Post
Sailing isn't sexist, but don't pretend that the sexes aren't different.

The great majority of sailboats in a given marina are owned by men, or if they're owned by a couple (hetero), then the man is the one who decided to get the boat.

If the man gets hit by a bus, the boat will be sold. Most likely to another man.

Women aren't excluded from sailing, but the female sailboat owner is still a rarity.
Addressing only the ownership issue, I agree sorta as it pertains to the outside world. You might find that on sailing forums there is a smaller gap between the number of women members who own boats singly and women members who have joint ownership and are active participants in maintenance and sailing.

I'll stick my hand up as buying my first boat on my own and being the one to initiate buying the second boat after I found a SO. I gave away my first boat to a woman who happened to take my sailing class.
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  #12  
Old 04-17-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

Can anyone think of a marina that won't allow a women to rent a slip or a broker than won't sell a woman a boat? No barrier to entry that I can think of.

People are sexist. Sailing is not.
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  #13  
Old 04-17-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

on my prior boats
wife co signed the loan or the vessel was documented to both of us.
?who owns the boat. Know what a lawyer would say.
never bought a boat without major input from admiral.
I won't live on my boat- we will
I won't cruise to various places- we will.
When I need to sleep- she will run the boat. When she sleeps I will.

Don't think there are sexist activities- think there are sexist people.

P.S.- Best blue water sailor I ever knew was a petit librianian ( yup truly). Meet her when I was ~30 and she was in her 60s ( my guess). Learned more about sail shape and how to run a boat from her then from just about anyone else I've known. Given her body habitus she taught me the easy way to do everything which usually turns out to be the right way.
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Old 04-17-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

Hit the nail on the head!

The reality? Women "generally" have no interest there's no conspiracy and there's nothing wrong with it.

Anyway, what's wrong with a boat bunny!
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  #15  
Old 04-17-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

It's a known fact that women are bad luck on a boat. Simple caution could look like sexism.
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Old 04-17-2013
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Well I am disappointed on my phone I thought this was "is sailing sexy."

I will say if this forum's conservative bend is any indication it might be. There is also the fact that there cannot be true equality in real offshore sailing. Some one has to be in charge, in emergency situations decisions are made and followed. This is important to safety of all involved. To me it would not matter who is making the decisions man or woman. For me I would not have issues with taking orders from a female captain. But I know for some it would be an issue. I would love to find a woman to sail with.

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Old 04-17-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

As for the gender specific chores, I don't buy it.
In the old British navy the boats were mostly inhabited by men, but not necessarily exclusively. Men usually did all of the so called "pink" chores: cooking, cleaning, sewing as well as the piloting, sail trim and navigating chores. The sailmaker was an important member of the crew in those days.
I like to cook and I am re-learning how to sew by hand while sewing up some tears in our 10 year old genoa. I enjoy acting as steward on board my boat when we have company.
If I can do both the "pink" and "blue" jobs then so can a woman. Think of solo circumnavigator donna Lange among others.
Sailing isn't sexist; our culture is.
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Old 04-17-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

My wife and I are relatively new to cruising size boats. She is a more competent sailor than I am, having grown up around boats, and probably should take the "captain" role. She is also smarter than I am and realized that if she puts me in charge during high visibility situations (like docking), people will assume I am the "captain" and it is me that gets to look like an idiot when things go wrong.

Last edited by mr_f; 04-18-2013 at 12:13 AM.
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  #19  
Old 04-18-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

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Originally Posted by mr_f View Post
My wife and I are relatively new to cruising size boats. She is a more competent sailor than I am, having grown up around boats, and probably should take the "captain" role. She is also smarter than I am and realized that if she puts me in charge during high visibility situations (like docking), people will assume I am the "captain" and it is me that gets to look like an idiot when things go wrong.
Now there is one smart gal!
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Old 04-18-2013
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Re: Is Sailing Sexist?

Somewhat relevant to the title of this thread was an article in "Sailing" magazine. To me, I do not see sailing as inherently sexist. That said, many boats are set up with winch and line loadings that are designed around what an average fit man can routinely manage. My wife who is in good physical shape complains that these loads are bigger than she can handle easily. While there are many un-fit men out there, and many very fit woman, perhaps it is time for designers to increase the mechanical advantage so that a larger cohort of the population can easily manage the loads.

Anyway, below is the article on recent growth in sailing coming in the from women taking up the sport....

GROWTH: The secret is out, and she’s female

You sail like a mom: It’s a compliment, not a put-down



While sailing industry types scratch their heads trying to find the right formula to increase the number of kids in sailing programs, and sailing clubs and racing associations nationwide worry about declining memberships, sailing is shifting and growing under their feet.

Promoters repackage races to appeal to shoreside fans of testosterone-loaded extreme sports, selling sponsorships to brands which, in turn, hope fans will buy shirts or drinks, and sailboat builders seek designs hoping for mass appeal or some new “breakthrough” formula, all while sailing is being revolutionized from the inside out.

Sailing is becoming the activity of adult women.

Don’t believe it? Quick, say the last names of Ellen, Dawn, Betsy and Anna. You got them all in a few seconds right? Now try to do that quickly with the names of four guys who sail.

But it’s much more than a few popular female sailing athletes. This revolution isn’t being led by pros or celebrities, but by grassroots changes and on all new terms.

Here’s some evidence: Facebook analytics reports that among 1.1 million Americans who express an interest in sailing, women account for 51%, and 88% of them are over 25 years old. But they’re not just fans. Women under 24 and over 35 share their own sailing experiences on Facebook almost twice as often as men.

Consider that only 20 years ago, men outnumbered women in sailing 7-to-1.

You might see it in your town. What sailing center’s teaching staff isn’t dominated by strong, athletic, articulate and confident female sailing instructors? What collegiate sailing team doesn’t have at least as many women as men? What yacht club doesn’t like to boast about its first female commodore? And what regatta doesn’t overplay its all-female entries?

At the 2012 Soling Worlds for example, someone stood up at the opening ceremony to announce that boat No. 601, skippered by Whitney Kent and crewed by Cate Muller and Ashley Henderson, was the first all-female team ever in a Soling World Championship, and everyone loudly cheered and applauded, as if it was something strange and new. Sure, Soling fleet demographics lean to older guys who still seem focused on the Olympic trials of the 1970s, so they may not have noticed what has been happening recently in other fleets. The No. 601 team wasn’t there as a novelty or to be called out as tokens. Between them, the three women have decades of sailing experience and stellar records, racing and winning in one-design and handicapped events all over the country. They had trained for the event all summer because it happened to be coming to their hometown, and sailed respectably against tough competition.

In many cities near water in the U.S., women are organizing all-women teams and events. These events often grow organically out of a small network of veteran sailors who cobble together some used boats and recruit and help train newcomers until they’ve built a decent-sized fleet. In my town, summer Monday nights (the night the women sail) are the busiest nights on the bay. You might also notice that unlike classically organized sailing events, those for women organized by women don’t have a “yachty,” “club” or an “exclusive” feel. They don’t originate behind a closed gate or in the haze of cigar smoke at a bar. Instead, friends call friends and they go sailing. Everyone, regardless of skill, affiliation, age or experience is welcome, except, of course, for the men.

And here’s something new and different: unlike most adult men in sailing who will tell you that they’ve sailed forever, many women are entering the sport as adults. Often it happens while seeking social connections before or after marriage or kids. A woman will move to a new city to take a job, and the local sailing center looks attractive as a place to meet people and relax in the evenings. Friendships are sparked and a lifelong sailing adventure begins.

Women who get a taste for sailing in women-only events or in community programs often join teams that also include men and when they do, they’re just as good as the men, sometimes better. In my experience, among my crewmates, the women have the deepest commitment, train the hardest and can be the most motivated and motivational skippers.

Sailing belies gender. Women have everything it takes—strength, quickness, smarts and creativity—to sail at any level, from boat rides to blue water, from match racing to solo around-the-world adventures, from dinghies to tall ships.
But there is a more important aspect to this trend. When women who sail also happen to be moms, as they often are or will be, sailing becomes the activity of their families too.

When a sailing mom’s kids are very young, they get an inspiring early taste. They learn to be on and around boats and sailors, to wear life jackets, to touch water, and to be safe. Then, when her kids are old enough to be on a sailing team, the family becomes the team. Mom doesn’t sit in the bleachers at a soccer field, she trims the kite, steers the boat or calls tactics.

So I propose that the most important person on any sailing boat is the mom. Think about it this way: When a mom sails with her kids (instead of driving them to soccer) she’s doing something deemed suited only to men just a few years ago, and she is not doing the things thought to be the status quo for moms today. She’s a renegade. An innovator. A leader.

And that, all you industry types, club and racing association managers, boat makers and sponsors, is how you get kids into sailing.
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