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  #11  
Old 06-23-2013
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Re: Fear of heeling

Find a cheap dinghy, and sail the bejesus out of it. You'll get used to heeling (and turtling, and righting, et cetera) real fast.
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Old 06-23-2013
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Re: Fear of heeling

I am encouraged that you can deal with this because:
- you are spending time with your family at 16 so you have support
- you know what you are feeling and can articulate it
- you want to change things.

Does your boat have a heel gauge so you can read the degrees of heel directly? That will help to put some limits on what you are comfortable with when others are at the helm.

Communicate with others on the boat what you can tolerate and what you can't. This may change from day to day depending on the weather, and other apparently unrelated things like how much you sleep you had the night before.

Certainly do as others have said and spend time at the helm experimenting with trim and heel. Reef to maintain the heel as needed for your point of sail, that is what all those lines are for anyway!

We all change and experience things differently from day to day. You are normal. Just keep sailing and spending time with your family.

(didn't really mean to sound like Dear Abbey....)
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Old 06-24-2013
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I've done a lot of sailing on a cat 30 on lake Michigan. I agree with a previous poster that it should be comparatively little heel compared to say a c&c of the same size. A lesson in the physics can help if your a person who just needs to understand how things work. The more it heels the less sail area presented to the wind, also center of gravity and center of buoyancy diverge more and more, meaning it's becoming exponentially harder for the boat to heel farther. To capsize this boat would require a breaking wave of a height you're unlikely to encounter on day sailing on lake mich and the boat would likely come back around. Trying sitting hiking out on the high side and looking outboard. I would guess with your sailing experience you probably knew most this already, maybe remind yourself how often you've experienced this without incident.
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Fear of heeling

We once took a new-to-sailing friend out for a day sail on Lake Michigan. It was a great day; wind 15-20 blowing offshore so the waves were only about 2 feet. I avoided sailing close to the wind so we wouldn't be pounding. Perfect conditions.

Suddenly, we caught a gust that pushed us over from about 15 degrees to about 25. Our friend got a look of concern on her face but that passed when we returned to the 15 degree mark. She asked if the boat could roll over if the wind blew hard enough. I thought about explaining the physics of sailboats; heel, wind pressure, the countering effect of the keel, wind spilling as the sail moved further away from a right angle to the wind, etc., etc. Instead, I just said, "No. The boat can't roll over' No need to mention rogue waves and ocean currents since it was just a nice day on the lake. She seemed to relax after that.

As we motored into the harbor, she said she really enjoyed the day; especially after I told her that the boat couldn't sink. I calmly explained that I never said the boat couldn't sink but only that it couldn't roll over. Well, it was a darn good thing that I hadn't said that while we were out sailing because, from the way the color drained from her face, I thought that she might have jumped off the boat and tried to swim back to shore.
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Fear of heeling

A good leader is not always right, but they are always certain.

No, the boat will not roll over and, no, it will not sink. Next question.
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Re: Fear of heeling

A good leader also does not lie.
fryewe and -OvO- like this.
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Fear of heeling

My standard method of dealing with people sailing on Synergy and who are afraid of heeling is that I tell them "'Synergy' weighs as much as four Volkswagon Jettas. The equivillent of two of those Jettas are in the form of a lead shark's fin hanging six feet below the boat. As the boat leans over, it is like the boat is trying to pick up those two volkswagons balanced on the far end of a diving board. At the same time the sail is laying flatter so the wind can't hit it as hard. We're not going over." It usually works.
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Re: Fear of heeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary Flower View Post
A good leader also does not lie.
It's most certainly not a lie, if as the leader you intend to make it so.

Truth is, you could be hit by a meteor. Rolling over and sinking are controllable.
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Fear of heeling

Fear of (excess) healing can be a good thing...
generally, excess heeling is slow, creates extra leeway, reduces VMG to your destination, and causes you to lose ground to other boats. You may feel better after you do a lot of exploring of all the ways to de-power.
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Re: Fear of heeling

Quote:
Originally Posted by KBuckley View Post
Does your boat have a heel gauge so you can read the degrees of heel directly? That will help to put some limits on what you are comfortable with when others are at the helm.
Another thing my heel gauge told me, is that the boat is not heeling as much as you think. What you would guess is 45 degrees is more like 25 on the gauge. Now I have a self-imposed limit of 25 degrees, and it's actually quite hard to exceed that.

I can't recommend this, but when I was doing basic keelboat, we went out in 30 kts or so in a Santana 22 and got some experience of how an over-canvased boat behaves. Now all these comments assume you aren't flying a spinnaker... but there is almost no way you could capsize that boat from wind force alone. The tendency to head up into the wind simply becomes overwhelming.

To capsize a well-designed keelboat you need a breaking wave on the beam, the height of which is a minimum of 1/3 boat length. (keelboats vary from 1/3 to over 50%). Your Catalina would need at least a 10 ft breaking wave.

A knockdown is a different matter but virtually all of those are due to flying a spinnaker when you should not. (ie, most racers)
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