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Old 05-24-2011
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Talking So I quit my job . . .

I have been around for a little while, but haven't formally introduced myself so far. I have really enjoyed all the great info provided on these forums, and find myself killing my phone battery pretty much every day, reading every chance I get (even at red lights while driving). Anyway, as stated above, I wanted to introduce myself and announce the official beginning of my quest for the cruising lifestyle. I have a 3 yr plan, and based on my research and personal ambitions, I think it is a pretty solid plan.

Some might not think that quiting my job would be a sound first step in a 3 yr moving aboard plan, but the job I was in was not getting me any closer to my goals, so I took a new sales job that should, although it will be more work, allow me to make more money and allow me to build my cruising budget. I'm a little nervous about the change, but excited. My new job is somewhat seasonal though, and will allow me some free time during the winter months. Which brings me to my question. . .

If I end up being as slow during the winter months as I think I might; what would be a good trade/skill to study/learn? I am already a pretty competent carpenter. I used to build and remodel homes for a living. Iím just curious what others, who are already living aboard, wish they knew more about before they set out. Unfortunately, living in KS, I canít work on my sailing skills in the winter.

Iím sorry if there is a post out there covering this already, but I couldnít find one. Also, I was just excited to announce the true start of my quest for the cruising life.


Thanks again for all the insight that you have provided so far and thanks in advance for any thoughts on my above question,

Nate
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Old 05-24-2011
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refridgeration, deisels, and electricity.......i2f
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Old 05-25-2011
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Study sailing and cruising, practice knotting and splicing.
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Old 05-25-2011
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Thank you both. I picked up a book on marine diesel engines last night and made it through the first chapter and a half. I have been practicing my knots a lot lately and usually carry a section of rope with me all the time. I have been reading as much as I can lately and have a sunfish that I am practicing on every chance that my busy schedule allows. I plan to read a book on boat electronic systems next. I know that there is a lot that can't be learned just by reading books, and I learn best by doing, but reading is better than nothing right now.

Thanks again!

Nate
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Old 05-25-2011
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Welcome Nate,

A few things for your to consider:
1. Get out of KS and move to the area where a lot of sailboats around by the ocean.
2. Capitalize your skills in carpentry, make money efficiently.
3. If you earn 100 dollars, save 95 dollars. I know it is hard, but you get the picture. It is old fashion, but it is a sure way.
4. Don't get marry and don't have kids.
5. Learn how to cook and don't eat out and don't eat junk food.
5A. Drive a beat up car and never lease a car.
5B. Never borrow money for toys or vacation
6. Good formal education is needed, don't overlook its importance. It is the foundation for developing your critical thinking skills. When in emergency, you will be glad that you have the skills to make the right decision.
7. Find a sailing club for networking and learning
8. Crewing as much as you can for others
9. Be patient and remain focused.

Be glad that you are still young, the sky is the limit. Go for it. Gook luck and please report back in 3 years.
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Old 05-25-2011
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What kind of sales are you in? I quit my job a while back and started selling cars. I bought a boat and moved on board, rented out the house and things are coming together. My boat is in a ship yard currently where they let me live aboard while doing work to it. There are two other guys living aboard in the yard that work for the yard in order to pay for the boats they bought from the same yard! I used to by and sell houses myself doing a fair amount of handyman work. Theres nothing like hands on to give you the knowledge about boat mechanics and maintainance you will need. If you want a lead to move down to the gulf south let me know I might be able to help. Johnny
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Old 05-30-2011
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Nate, wouldn’t hurt to learn restaurant skills (bartending, waiting tables, line cook etc.) Great way to meet people in a new town/port and after cruising it’s the first place you'll want to go when you go ashore. As a side bonus, you'll learn stuff that will serve you well at sea! -Cheers!
p.s. food poisoning + bad weather = a very dangerous situation
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Old 05-30-2011
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diesel knowledge will not only save you money on repairs but can make you money out there. But you need to sail, sail, sail and not on freshwater. there is NO replacement for ocean sailing experience. i live on s.f. bay now and have heard the adage "if you can sail on the s.f. bay you can sail anywhere" ad nausaem it is NOT true. it does help but again there is no replacemet for ocean sailing experience. move to whichever coast you would prefer to leave from. hang out at the docks yards, etc. crew every chance you can, find a boat, go!
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Old 05-30-2011
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Moving aboard. But if you plan to sail the boat, you'll also need to add meteorology and navigation to the skills, and understanding weather maps and trends can really be a nice skill when you are sailing.

When the job slows down or peters out for the winter, consider moving to wherever you might want to move when you get the boat. (Presumably not Kansas?) Folks in Florida and Texas often go north for the summer and run two seasonal businesses, but there's nothing to stop you from checking out the northeast or midstates in the summer, trying to get something seasonal and maybe related to boats, so you get a chance to move around and see your options.
A small RV can makes sense if that fits your plans, a way to try out different venues before you choose one.
And if you can afford to take the summers off, as Steve says being a dock rat is invaluable. You may or may not take to it, but you'll find out which boats are "Yugos" and which ones are Buicks.
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Old 05-30-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tattoosteve View Post
diesel knowledge will not only save you money on repairs but can make you money out there. But you need to sail, sail, sail and not on freshwater. there is NO replacement for ocean sailing experience. i live on s.f. bay now and have heard the adage "if you can sail on the s.f. bay you can sail anywhere" ad nausaem it is NOT true. it does help but again there is no replacemet for ocean sailing experience. move to whichever coast you would prefer to leave from. hang out at the docks yards, etc. crew every chance you can, find a boat, go!
After sailing on other people's boats in the midwest, and Bahamas. I decided to learn to sail, and buy a boat. I was also on S.F. Bay, and there is no replacement for the ocean. The bay is a great place to hone skills though. It is very challenging.........i2f
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