SailNet Community

SailNet Community (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/)
-   Introduce Yourself (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/introduce-yourself/)
-   -   Harken Verses CDI Furler (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/introduce-yourself/81542-harken-verses-cdi-furler.html)

jeffgoldberg 12-08-2011 02:32 PM

Harken Verses CDI Furler
 
I'm in the process of purchasing a new furler for my boat. I have pretty much setteled on the Harken. Looking for input on Pro's and Con's of Harken verses CDI system. As far as the Harken any setup and install tricks you might have. This system is to be installed on a 1968 Cal 25. I look forward to your input. Thanks Jeff.

MarkSF 12-08-2011 05:58 PM

One important thing is to heed Harken's instructions, concerning the angle the jib halyard makes versus the forestay. If it's less than a certain angle, they specify a halyard restrainer on the mast.

Having suffered a halyard wrapped around the furler / forestay, I suggest a restrainer if in any doubt. If it happens, it'll be on a windy day in the middle of the ocean. Then you get to wrap the jib by hand around the forestay.

Harken also recommend their ratchet block for the furling line. This is good advice too, it really helps deploy the jib in a progressive way instead of with a big bang when it's windy.

Faster 12-08-2011 06:32 PM

Another good feature of the Harken is the ease with which you can expose the forestay turnbuckle for adjustment/inspection. The CDI may as well, not sure, but it's pretty easy with the way the Harken provides that kind of access. Most older furlers did not facilitate this.

knothead 12-08-2011 06:42 PM

I agree with both previous posts. The only thing I'm wondering about is why you are limiting your choices to only these two.
For instance; if you are planning to replace the headstay, which I would strongly advise if it's more than a couple of years old, you might want to consider a Furlex. They come with the wire, a furling line, lead blocks, and most importantly restrainers.
I believe Hood is also offering a package deal on the Sea Furl 5.
Why not compare them all. Just a thought. :)

DonScribner 12-10-2011 08:24 AM

I don't know much about furlers but I own a CDI. The "halyard" runs inside the foil so there is no possibility of halyard wrap . . I think. I mean, my standard jib halyard still goes through the mast head and down the mast but is held taut at all times. Is this the same situation that could cause halyard wrap?

MarkSF 12-10-2011 01:20 PM

I took a look at the CDI website, on the FF, at least, the halyard is internal so it can't suffer the wrap problem I had with the Harken. But if installed correctly the Harken works fine.

I don't know what you mean by this : "my standard jib halyard still goes through the mast head and down the mast but is held taut at all times"

The CDI design I can see has an internal halyard and the furler replaces the forestay. The standard halyard is redundant. Or am I missing something?

knothead 12-10-2011 11:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DonScribner (Post 805042)
I don't know much about furlers but I own a CDI. The "halyard" runs inside the foil so there is no possibility of halyard wrap . . I think. I mean, my standard jib halyard still goes through the mast head and down the mast but is held taut at all times. Is this the same situation that could cause halyard wrap?

No. Halyard wrap is caused when the same halyard that is attached to the halyard swivel gets wrapped around the foil. The CDI doesn't have a halyard swivel.
If you keep the unused regular halyard taut it will probably never be a problem.
A Spinnaker halyard can be more of a problem. Since they are above the headstay, they have more of a tendency to get caught up in the furler. You have to figure out how to keep them clear.

CDI's internal halyard does eliminate the need for a halyard restrainer.

knothead 12-10-2011 11:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MarkSF (Post 805107)
I took a look at the CDI website, on the FF, at least, the halyard is internal so it can't suffer the wrap problem I had with the Harken. But if installed correctly the Harken works fine.

I don't know what you mean by this : "my standard jib halyard still goes through the mast head and down the mast but is held taut at all times"

The CDI design I can see has an internal halyard and the furler replaces the forestay. The standard halyard is redundant. Or am I missing something?

None of CDI's systems replace the forestay They are installed over the forestay and rotate around it.
You're right, the standard halyard is redundant with the CDI.

Faster 12-11-2011 12:09 AM

Wasn't it the Hyde (Streamstay?) that used the foil as a stay? It also had twin grooves but at opposite ends of the foil, IIRC. Seemed an awkward setup to use....

wmmulvey 12-11-2011 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeffgoldberg (Post 804460)
I'm in the process of purchasing a new furler for my boat. I have pretty much setteled on the Harken. Looking for input on Pro's and Con's of Harken verses CDI system. As far as the Harken any setup and install tricks you might have. This system is to be installed on a 1968 Cal 25. I look forward to your input. Thanks Jeff.

Jeff,

Check this out

Alado Nautica USA Reefing and Roller Furling Systems Home Page

I'm getting a furler for this season. I pretty much think this will be the one.

BILL
ESPA
1969 MORGAN 30


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:30 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012