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deow 12-26-2011 03:10 PM

Retiring Aboard
 
Hello all,

I was thinking of retiring on a sailboat in about five years. I expect to join the Royal Hamilton Yacht Club (Ontario) in the summer so that I can get some experience and training. I know that for a lot of people, living on a boat is a fascinating idea that can sour quickly when put into practice. I've got five years to see if I actually love sailing rather than just the idea of it.

There's a lot of great information on this site. I just got here, and I've already learned a lot :)

Faster 12-26-2011 03:22 PM

You've got the right plan... join a club, get some experience and maybe even some cruising time if you make the right friends.. but.....

What sort of boat are you planning on (do you have one now?)
Around here the costs alone to join a 'Royal' club at near-retirement age will buy you a pretty decent boat...
Is this a solo liveaboard situation?
Does your club/or other available moorage locations sanction liveaboards?

Budget will have a big bearing on how successful this plan is.. best of luck with it!

.. and Welcome to Sailnet!:)

deow 12-26-2011 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Faster (Post 810579)
What sort of boat are you planning on (do you have one now?)

I was thinking of a 30' to 35' older boat. I've looked online and there are tons of them out there for less than $50K. I want functional over fancy. For example, I'd be happy with mostly just a head, galley, and hammock inside.

Quote:

Around here the costs alone to join a 'Royal' club at near-retirement age will buy you a pretty decent boat...
A 3-month Introductory Membership is around $750. The courses aren't all that expensive.

Quote:

Is this a solo liveaboard situation?
Yes.

Quote:

Does your club/or other available moorage locations sanction liveaboards?
I'd leave this area when the time came. I was thinking of spending my time between Montreal and the Maritimes to begin with, and heading to the Caribbean and further afield, eventually.

Quote:

Budget will have a big bearing on how successful this plan is..
I have some flexibility -- I could wait a bit longer to retire if the numbers don't look good enough. My plan is to go at 62, but I could go at 65.

Quote:

best of luck with it!

.. and Welcome to Sailnet!:)
Thanks :)

Faster 12-26-2011 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deow (Post 810591)
I was thinking of a 30' to 35' older boat. I've looked online and there are tons of them out there for less than $50K. I want functional over fancy. For example, I'd be happy with mostly just a head, galley, and hammock inside.

For $50K and 30-ish feet you should do fine... maybe even more than a hammock!;) esp if you have time to research and shop but be ready to 'pull the trigger' on the 'right' deal...



Quote:

A 3-month Introductory Membership is around $750. The courses aren't all that expensive.
I don't believe that options exists here. Interesting. I'm a similar age to yourself and to join RVYC would likely cost $30K plus - and we'd still be on a moorage waitlist.

Quote:

I'd leave this area when the time came. I was thinking of spending my time between Montreal and the Maritimes to begin with, and heading to the Caribbean and further afield, eventually.
Living on the hook does avoid moorage issues, but seasonally on the east coast you're still looking at winter haulouts.. regular marina visits would chew into the day to day budgeting pretty quick.

The plan to cruise south narrows the field of acceptable boats.. and raises the ante on seaworthiness and good equipment for the slog down the coast...

Keep us posted!!

wingNwing 12-26-2011 06:03 PM

Hey, welcome! We've been living on an older (1980) 33-footer for almost 10 years, and loving our life! Betting you will too. Lots of boats in your price/size range ... and we've seen some surprisingly lightweight things coasting south. Since you're retiring, you'll have time to pick the best weather (which means you aren't limited to bluewater boats).

CaptainForce 12-26-2011 07:48 PM

We share some of WingNwing's cruising ground and cruise south for the winter as retirees. We've been cruising north and south while living aboard on the East Coast for many years while keeping some community in 25 to 30 ports. We spend much time anchored out, but when we do take a slip we usually take a monthly rate. Daily transient rates are high. Free docks and anchorages with amenities are not common, but present for short periods and some mooring fields suit us well. There's a fairly large supportive community that tends to flock in specific areas with the seasons. There are "snowbird rookeries" in Vero Beach and Marathon that we avoid, but some like to stick with the big crowds. At the the northern range marinas are more expensive north of the Chesapeake, but there are great summer anchorages all the way up through Maine. We usually find our best monthly rates in Baltimore and the St. Johns River of North Florida, but cruise from Maine to the Bahamas. We know little about houses, but we've been liveaboard cruisers for forty years and it's an easy life. Take care and joy, Aythya crew

deow 12-28-2011 03:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Faster (Post 810594)
The plan to cruise south narrows the field of acceptable boats.. and raises the ante on seaworthiness and good equipment for the slog down the coast...

I need to learn the difference between boats. Is this a matter of fundamental design and specifications, or merely equipment?

deow 12-28-2011 03:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wingNwing (Post 810608)
Since you're retiring, you'll have time to pick the best weather (which means you aren't limited to bluewater boats).

I could also buy a boat that's already south, and just stay there. I have to admit that I don't even know enough to make a plan, so it's all wide open at this point :)

deow 12-28-2011 03:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CaptainForce (Post 810639)
we've been liveaboard cruisers for forty years and it's an easy life.

That's a good long time. It appears that a love of sailing tends to become a lifelong thing. I'm surprised how many older people are out in the water, as well. Even though I'm starting late in life, I might still have several years to sail around with.

Faster 12-28-2011 11:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deow (Post 811073)
I need to learn the difference between boats. Is this a matter of fundamental design and specifications, or merely equipment?

Fact is, most boats can probably take more than most people, but if you're doing mostly daysailing harbourhopping, or passages rarely more than a night or two long then pretty well any well-found production boat will do, esp, as wing-n-wing suggested, you pick your weather windows.

Boats considered 'blue water' or serious offshore boats will be better suited for long passages, trans-ocean type of sailing. One of the main requirements here besides serious structural integrity is adequate storage for food, water and gear. These boats tend to be on the heavier side, both in construction and displacement.

Loading down a mid to lightweight cruiser/racer with enough food/water to sustain a crew to Hawaii, for example, can seriously impact the performance of the boat until some of the heavy stores are consumed. Sailing solo some of these issues are easier to deal with as you'll need less.

Buying a boat already there makes sense except that you won't get the boat-owning experience you want in the immediate future (which would stand you in good stead once you set off - there's nothing like truly knowing your boat)

If you're thinking the ICW and maybe Bahamas then another major consideration is going to be draft, I believe over 5 feet can limit your options in the islands. However you can certainly follow that path with a boat that would not be considered 'blue water'...

As you can see, nothing's simple....Do lots of reading and research early on, and do join that club and get some experience on the water... you'll find your way I'm sure!

Here's a link to a google search on hull/keel types - should be some worthwhile browsing here:

http://www.google.ca/#sclient=psy-ab...w=1696&bih=847


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