Compresion post repaired - Page 4 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Boat Builders Row > Islander
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #31  
Old 03-19-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chino Hills, CA
Posts: 39
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
510datsun is on a distinguished road
Re: Compresion post repaired

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
A nice way to pump the icebox is with a foot pump connected to a spigot on the sink. The obvious reason for this? In the morning or early afternoon, when the sink is empty and likely to stay that way, you put in the stopper, pump the icebox, and now you've got a sink full of reasonably clean ice water to cool down drinks for the hot part of the day.

Don't need the cold drinks? That's ok, you can still pump the meltwater down the galley drain.
Genius, I'm changing mine up to this set up, but with my current pump, ASAP.
I used an old thru hole for the exhaust, I have an electric motor, so an easy change.

Just a nice cold splash on the face in the morning to wake you up too!
I guess we need to put this on another thread so we don't get of topic, but still pass on great ideas for modifications to the Islander 28.

Thanks for the suggestion!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #32  
Old 03-19-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chino Hills, CA
Posts: 39
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
510datsun is on a distinguished road
Re: Compression post repaired

Quote:
Originally Posted by gknott View Post
Thanks 510, I'll double check mine. When you were rooting around down there did you have a chance to see what kind of wood was used in the cross members? Mine are completely fiberglass covered so I cannot tell. What I do know from test drilling is that they are sound but saturated. Unfortunately, I do not have a dry bilge - yet. Which leaves me curious about your ice box pump. How did you set that up? Right now mine drains into a plastic container which I empty daily - or forget to empty daily.
Hellosailor has a great solution for the icebox.

The cross members are several piece of plywood fiberglassed together. One is two pieces and the thicker one is three pieces, then glass mat used to attach to the hull.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #33  
Old 03-19-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chino Hills, CA
Posts: 39
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
510datsun is on a distinguished road
Re: Compresion post repaired

Here is the current condition of my bilge.

Before:




After and current condition. I used a rust Encapsulator to seal the plate and the keel bolts. I normally would not have sealed the keel bolts, but mine are rusted so bad they are not serviceable and would need to be replaced. However, they are not leaking or needing torqued, so just keeping them from further corrosion.



Thanks to a Dripless stuffing box!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #34  
Old 03-19-2013
hellosailor's Avatar
Plausible Deniability
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,559
Thanks: 2
Thanked 83 Times in 81 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
Re: Compresion post repaired

Nice clean bilge. I still have a limited trust for concrete, it will find ways to steal water, even from the air on damp days, and then stash it away internally.

If you're planning to use the icebox water on your face, or anything similar, just take care not to let spilt milk, etc. get in the box. If you're just using it to cool drinks, you've got a little extra isolation from it in case of "funk" in the water.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #35  
Old 03-19-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chino Hills, CA
Posts: 39
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
510datsun is on a distinguished road
Re: Compresion post repaired

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Nice clean bilge. I still have a limited trust for concrete, it will find ways to steal water, even from the air on damp days, and then stash it away internally.

If you're planning to use the icebox water on your face, or anything similar, just take care not to let spilt milk, etc. get in the box. If you're just using it to cool drinks, you've got a little extra isolation from it in case of "funk" in the water.
LOL, for sure, maybe not using it on the face is such a good idea.

I have totally squashed the idea of concrete in the bilge as part of the fix, for the reasons you have given. That is whats nice about having a forum to bounce off ideas, and come up with legitimate solutions for the problem.

I'm sticking to the joices being rebuilt, the aluminum plate, and I have a piece of 3/4 inch Teak to cut out a 5 inch ring to use between the wood post and the metal post.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #36  
Old 03-20-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chino Hills, CA
Posts: 39
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
510datsun is on a distinguished road
Re: Compression post repaired

Here are some pictures of the two support for the compression post under the cabin sole. You can see the fiberglass cloth cracking and separating from the supports.

Here is the Aft support, and most visible from the bilge. The separation is at the bottom of the the fiberglass attaching the support to the hull in the bilge.


Here is the forward support at the location between the two supports. You can clearly see the delamination where the support is attached to the hull in the bilge wall.


In this shot, it doesn't look like they use much to attach the forward support on the forward portion of the bilge wall. I think it should be well attached here for better support.


Here is a shot of both supports and the problem area


Here is a shot of the cabin sole of what I have cut away to start the repairs.


Here is a shot in the head showing my initial outline cutting of the head sole. You can see they used a piece of FRP, white square, to shim the wood compression post.


Initially I thought Islander used a piece of 3/4 thick plywood under the wood post, between the wood post and plywood floor, but after taking the head wood work apart to be able to do the repairs, and having better light and visual of the wood post, it's actually a water line from resting water in the boat for a long period of time. The waterline is visible on the salon sautés too. Good thing they used the grad of plywood that they did, most plywood would have rotted, but the floor is fine. The teak and holy plywood is junk for sure. The extended period of water that high in the boat would contribute to the degeneration of the support fiberglassed sections too.


I will post more pictures and how I repair the area as I get time.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #37  
Old 03-30-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Chino Hills, CA
Posts: 39
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
510datsun is on a distinguished road
Re: Compression post repaired

Ok, I finally finished the "Compression Post Repair", I'm going to attempt to recount my process of this fix for you.

First, after doing this repair, the best thing to do for this repair is to REMOVE THE MAST. You don't have to haul the boat out to remove the mast. Find a recommended rigging person, hire them to remove the mast for you, they can put it back up for you too, it's worth the $200 for each way. If you are going to do the repair, you are saving plenty of $$ by not paying a contractor to do the repair. I found with all of the repairing required it was safer and easier to work on the area.

I did this repair with basic knowledge, mechanical ability, wood and fiberglass craftsmanship. If you can use a jigsaw, sawzall, hammer, chisel, skill saw, mix epoxy and polyester resin, you can do the repair.

Materials needed

1 quart or polyester resin and catalyst
3/4 inch marine plywood, smallest portion you can buy, you don't need much
Colloidal Silica- West Marine 406
Low Density Filler- West Marine 407
14 X 10 X 3/4 Teak board
24 X 10 X 3/4 Aluminum Plate
Can Self Etching Primer
Can Black paint

So, here is the problem on my particular boat in the below pictures.

Cabin Top


Cabin Counter



Cabin Sole


Basic procedure, after mast has been removed, I cutout a section of the cabin sole a little over twice the size of the aluminum plate I was installing. You need an area large enough to put the plate down and then slide it under the wood post and bulkhead. I cut out the two cabin sole mast supports, fiberglass in new supports, installed the plate, and lowered the cabin top. I then removed the bolts from the bottom of the metal post. I then jacked up the cabin top again. I removed the metal post, cut out the counter top, replaced the counter top portion with a teak piece, and the problem fixed. I have to replace my cabin sole, but with planning, you could still manage to save the cabin sole.

So, the first few things to do to prepare the area before jacking up the cabin top. I removed two pieces of the trim on the counter, one long piece of trim along the head door and meeting at the counter, I removed the head, head platform, and the angled wood and trim by the wood post. I removed the table from the screw on bracket at the slide bar.

I cut off the 1/4 teak cabin sole plywood, I will be replacing the cabin sole. I cut the floor back to the next aft floor support from the two under the compression post. I used a 1 1/2 diameter wood drill to drill hole I could then use my sawzall to make the cut out.

I plan to make the access area for the bilge, keel bolts, and compression post plate, as two doors instead of one door arrangement originally. While I believe my plate will last many years, I still want to be able to visually inspect it from time to time or replace if needed.

Floor cut out in the head


Floor cut out in the Cabin Sole


I used a non-hydraulic because I can control raising and lowering better, and the jack won't have the risk of bleeding off. I didn't get pictures of how I rigged the jack and boards because I was busy during the procedure with too many variables to snap pictures.

I put a 3/4 piece of plywood against the port sautee across from the head at the most forward portion. I then put a short piece of 2x4 several inches away from the plywood on the cabin sole, to create an even surface this is where the cabin sole on the port side starts to angle up and in. I then placed a 3/4 piece of plywood on the 2x4 and braced against the other plywood. I put the bottle jack on the plywood, placed a small piece 2x4 beside the jack between the plywood and jack to keep the jack from "kicking out". From there I measured the distance from the jack to the metal post by the flange by the bolt, cut a 2x4 a little shorter to have room to put it all in place and jack up. Make sure you have the head door "OPEN", the whole time doing the work. I then jacked up the cabin top about 1 inch, stopped when I heard the bulkhead cracking back by the starboard sautee. I was able to move the cabin sole portion under the wood post too. I then put wedged shims under the bulk head back by the starboard suatee and under the head door floor seal. I then let the jack down and removed the cut out piece of floor. I had a screw in the piece of wood to be removed right under the wood post. The manufacture obviously installed the 3/4 cabin sub-floor before putting in the bulkhead and compression post. So, I had to use a sawzall to cut the screw to be able to remove the piece of wood.

I then cut out the Two compression post supports and prepared the bilge and cabin sole area for epoxy.

Cabin floor aft support removed


Aft support after removal, you can see the supports are made of 3/4 plywood. The aft support was 2 pieces or 3/4 and the forward support was 3 pieces.





Head area ready for epoxy


Bilge and Cabin sole area ready for epoxy


I then applied the epoxy to the areas. I used epoxy to seal the area from water getting in to the areas. After the epoxy cured, about 24 hours, I then roughed up the epoxy, and then used polyester resin to glass the supports in place.

I used some flexible wire to make a pattern for the supports. I used polyester resin to glass 3/4 plywood, 2 pieces for the aft support, and 3 pieces for the forward support. I traced the wire and cut out the supports. I made my forward support the same height as my aft support, mine were not at the same height from manufacture, and the forward support did not make contact with the cabin sole on the other side of the bilge cutout. I had to sand the supports until i got them at the same level, and close to the original height of the aft support at original manufacture.

I had to add some support blocks under the cabin sole on each side of the bilge forward of the forward support to support the cabin floor. You need to do this prior to glassing the supports in.

I mixed up some polyester resin with West Marine 406, be careful on how much you add, too much, and the resin will harden to quickly. I then glassed in the forward support, mixed more resin, and glassed in the aft support.

Resin with 406


Glassed in supports




I then put some auto wax on the bottom of my aluminum plate, I want to be able to remove the plate if I need to at a later date. I then mixed up some polyester resin with 407, used for fairing out hull imperfections, etc, hard but sandable. I used this to "bed" my plate to the two supports. I then jacked up the cabin top, an installed the plate.

Plate installed cabin sole


Plated installed head area


I then let the jack down. I removed the screws from the bottom of the metal post. I then put a 2x4 cut to length to go between the bulkhead and the metal post. I had to do this to get the top portion of the cabin top to jack up some what evenly to be able to remove the metal post. This is the main reason for removing the mast, to fix the compression post, you need to replace the plywood between the metal post and the wood post in the head. You can get creative I suppose, and not do this, but I found it better solution. I used 3/4 teak wood to replace the counter top, they used teak between the cabin top and metal post, and it looked fine, so I went with it. I cut 14 inches from the corner at the head over. Getting the post in and out takes two people because of the wires running through the metal post.

Post removed


Counter top fixed


I replaced the wiring for the mast at this point, mine were so corroded several lights didn't work, and the wiring was the problem. Just another reason to remove the mast during this fix.

One of the problems facing with the metal post, is where to bolt it to on the counter top. I used the old counter top wood to get an approximation, then I used a square placed next to the post. I had the square level and looked to see if the square was parallel to the post, did this from several sides. Once I was happy, I marked the bolt holes, removed the post, drilled the four mounting holes and the center hole. Put the post back up, used one through bolt for the mast ground wire, and three #14 wood screws for the others. I then let down the jack. I then put the teak trim pieces back on.

Squaring up the post


Finished!!!



Cabin Top After Fix


Sorry for the lengthy post, but I wanted this topic to be covered in one post to give members who have an Islander 28 to see one of the few manufacturing flaws of the boat, and a way to fix it. I said manufacture flaw, not the designers flaw, the designer had the mast stepped at the keel, at least from what I have read about the boat. Bottom line is, it's worth fixing, I just love my Islander 28!!

Thanks for reading my lengthy post
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #38  
Old 04-07-2013
Skipaway's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 82
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Skipaway is on a distinguished road
Re: Compresion post repaired

Thanks, 510, for the great write-up & photos.
__________________
Charlie Lincoln • Cathlamet, WA • Islander 28 #108
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #39  
Old 04-08-2013
downeast450's Avatar
Tundra Down
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Seal Harbor, Maine
Posts: 1,228
Thanks: 25
Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 7
downeast450 is on a distinguished road
Re: Compresion post repaired

Well done 510. Thanks for all the detail.

It would be nice to have the old I-28 web site back. Even just the picture library to be kept on a site like photobucket. Lots of great stuff was there.

Down
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #40  
Old 04-08-2013
hellosailor's Avatar
Plausible Deniability
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,559
Thanks: 2
Thanked 83 Times in 81 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
Re: Compresion post repaired

down-
if you still have the old URL, look it up on the wayback machine at Internet Archive: Digital Library of Free Books, Movies, Music & Wayback Machine and you can, somewhat laboriously, pull up and save a copy of every page that was there.

Something like trying to build a chicken from a pot of chicken soup, but you should be able to find it there. And then of course, hosting a new web site to disseminate it is just a matter of money.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Failure to Navigate - interesting post on Panbo Blog & from the NewsReader Mass Bay Sailors 0 12-11-2006 06:15 PM
Eliminate Compression Post? Calculation of Force kaakre Gear & Maintenance 3 10-29-2006 04:01 PM
Wife abuser deported to Canada - National Post NewsReader News Feeds 0 09-29-2006 08:15 AM
Bent Rudder Post - C&C 36 PSSEATTLE Gear & Maintenance 4 05-18-2001 08:42 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:32 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.