Someone's giving me an Islander 24' - Page 3 - SailNet Community

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  #21  
Old 03-22-2013
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Re: Someone's giving me an Islander 24'

Okay, if you're simply going to plow down the ICW all the way home, (as you should) then any structural weakness caused by spongy bulkheads is a non-issue.


But, having said that....

As it stands you are into this boat for nothing, so, if it was me, here's what I would do:
When you get to the boat, grab something pointy and poke at the bottom of the bulheads and around the chainplates. if it's all mostly solid, you can consider stepping the rig.
Now, check the rig- how is the standing rigging? no meathooks, no tang cracks, bad looking swages, etc.? Running rig all present and usable? Good - step the rig.

Check any and all through-hulls for operation, and if they are even remotely suspect, slam a tapered plug in now, and mess with them later at your destination.
Clean it all up and bleach the hell out of it, and spend $50 on paper towels, garbage bags, cleaner and gloves. Yeah, i know, it odesn't need to be clean to sail. You're gonna be onboard for a while. Nothing makes a bad boat feel worse than being surrounded by filth.

Have fun, stay safe.
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  #22  
Old 03-22-2013
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Re: Someone's giving me an Islander 24'

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Originally Posted by bljones View Post
Okay, if you're simply going to plow down the ICW all the way home, (as you should) then any structural weakness caused by spongy bulkheads is a non-issue.


But, having said that....

As it stands you are into this boat for nothing, so, if it was me, here's what I would do:
When you get to the boat, grab something pointy and poke at the bottom of the bulheads and around the chainplates. if it's all mostly solid, you can consider stepping the rig.
Now, check the rig- how is the standing rigging? no meathooks, no tang cracks, bad looking swages, etc.? Running rig all present and usable? Good - step the rig.

Check any and all through-hulls for operation, and if they are even remotely suspect, slam a tapered plug in now, and mess with them later at your destination.
Clean it all up and bleach the hell out of it, and spend $50 on paper towels, garbage bags, cleaner and gloves. Yeah, i know, it odesn't need to be clean to sail. You're gonna be onboard for a while. Nothing makes a bad boat feel worse than being surrounded by filth.
Really good advice, thanks! The marine surveyor thought the bulkheads were sound, and he thought they were made of solid mahogany. We'll double check when we get there. We plan to spend a good two to three days working on it while we're there, and were planning on replacing the through-hulls and painting the bottom anyway.
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  #23  
Old 03-22-2013
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Re: Someone's giving me an Islander 24'

ap-
Your biggest problems may be the chainplates, which are heavy metal straps that connect the rigging to the hull on each side of the boat. If the material they are bolted into is the hull, or the bulkheads, you need to examine that very carefully. if it is wood that has rotted, literally the mast can pull them out and really ruin your day.

Then there's the deck, particularly where the mast is stepped on it and around that area. If it is mushy form water getting into the core, again, the mast can come down and really ruin your day.

Last is the interior woodwork, the settee bases, the bulkheads, all of it. If it has taken water damage and is unsound, the repair can be huge. To fix that properly you need to unbuild what is rotten, and then rebuild with proper marine grade lumber, not just plywood from Home Depot.

And then there's the rigging itself. If you run a white terrycloth over the cables, and ANY part of the cloth is torn off by "meathooks", the cabling all needs to be replaced. Not a huge expense on a 24'er but still, not cheap.

Could be a great adventure, and Islanders are generally well-behaved soundly built boats. The rule of thumb is that any work you do on a boat will cost 2-4x more than you think it will, and it will take 2-4x longer than you think, too. And that's optimistic.

Take a long hard look at it, put down some numbers of paper for what you think materials or repairs will cost, go to a diner (or bar<G>) and think it over carefully before you decide. If you take it home but change your mind later--that's a big expensive piece to haul to the landfill.

There can be other surprises, small problems that require expensive repairs to the rudder or keel, but that's an awful lot to get into with so little time. Boats can get very expensive, or you can get very lucky.
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Old 03-23-2013
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Re: Someone's giving me an Islander 24'

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Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
ap-
Your biggest problems may be the chainplates, which are heavy metal straps that connect the rigging to the hull on each side of the boat. If the material they are bolted into is the hull, or the bulkheads, you need to examine that very carefully. if it is wood that has rotted, literally the mast can pull them out and really ruin your day....

or you can get very lucky.
Thanks, hellosailor! More really helpful info. We'll try to look at everything very carefully. It can be difficult to do with the emotion of getting a new boat.
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Old 03-25-2013
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Re: Someone's giving me an Islander 24'

I had an Islander 24. Was the first sailboat I owned. Deck and cabin is half inch fiberglass. The hulls are solid glass. No coring. Full keel with outboard well. Cabins were small with a sink to starboard and a small cabnet to port. If I was given one I would take it. The hull is bullit proof.
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Old 03-25-2013
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Re: Someone's giving me an Islander 24'

Thanks again guys, just an update: hull does look sound, we've already painted the bottom, but will leave the rest of the painting for when we get back to New Orleans. The bulkheads need to be replaced at some point, but we've had two more experienced guys look at them and tell us that they are good for getting back home. They've been scabbed once already. The interior should be gutted as well, but we've got a lot of help and we'll enjoy doing the work. We haven't tested the running lights, but that's next on the list. The wind looks great this week for the gulf coast, even if it will be a little chilly.
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Old 03-25-2013
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Re: Someone's giving me an Islander 24'

That's the right attitude. Go for it. It will all buff right out.
No need to worry about the mold or the leaky chain plates or god for bid the hole in the deck. Splash some bottom paint on and drop her in.
How much time you putting in again? I think I remember hearing a "Good 2-3 days" prior to departing? And How far do you have to go? 250Miles or so?
One of my biggest concerns would be where are we going to sleep?
Off watch for me is very important and I don't think I would get much rest on a moldy board in a sleeping bag.
Hey, chances are you will be just fine, maybe not comfortable but you should survive.

One thing I remind myself of every time I am out there... I am the ONLY one responsible for my ship and every soul on board. Me and only me. There is not anybody that can come help if I get myself in a tight spot. "I" have to be responsible for getting my own ass and all those on board home safe.
You mentioned about getting Tow Boat Towing Insurance. This is probably a good idea, BUT DON'T think of it as a get out of Jail Free Card. YOU are responsible for your own safety and the safety of everybody on board that leaky boat.
When things go South, you have to be able to get North. NOBODY is going to come help you. You need to be able to react.

Do you have all the necessary safety devices; PFD's Throwable, MOB Recovery techniques, Flares, Fire extinguishers, First Aid Kits, Etc, Etc,

Just because you are taking a motor boat ride down the ditch does not mean stuff can't happen. It can and it will. You need to be prepared for any scenario.
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Old 04-26-2013
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Re: Someone's giving me an Islander 24'

I just returned with my $1000 boat on a $4000 trailer from Central FL East Coast having spent 5 mos. there; good fun, small budget. She is an Islander 24 Bahama. The advice given here is great! You can sure pour a lot of money into a boat, so buying one in good condition is very wise! Take your time, try to listen and consider all the advice and then take some more time. You are marrying this gal, not going for a weekend.
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