Centerboard Tradeoffs - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Contributing Authors > Learning to Sail Articles
 Not a Member? 


Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 12-02-2001
Contributing Authors
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 244
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
Mark Matthews is on a distinguished road
Centerboard Tradeoffs

What do you consider the negative aspects of a centerboard?

Mark Matthews responds:
Thanks for your question. The main drawback of a centerboard is maintenance. The worst thing that can happen with a centerboard is that it can become jammed in its trunk, whether because an overzealous crew member winched the board up too far and it got stuck, or because the wire pennant corroded or jumped the sheave, jamming the board in a halfway-up and halfway-down position. Also, weeds and other marine growth can also foul a centerboard, causing it to get stuck up in the trunk, and barnacles and other bottom growth can take a liking to the centerboard controls, which often requires that you use a pressure washer to remove them. Also, a life spent immersed in salt water can be hard for the cables or lines that lift the board, so these can also fail leaving the centerboard permanently in the down position.

Another drawback to centerboards is that some can clunk around in their trunks in a seaway or at a rough anchorage keeping you from a good night's rest or any peace and quiet during the day.

Also, if a centerboard is sufficiently large, it may require extra care when raising and lowering it. I once witnessed someone raising the centerboard on a 45-foot aluminum boat. The board was so large that the process required a two-handed winch handle. While I was watching, the crew lost control of the line, the centerboard fell, and the spinning winch handle whacked him several times before he knew what happened.

On the brighter side, centerboards can offer increased windward performance while still allowing a boat to enter shallower waters. Like so many other elements of sailing, centerboards offer a trade-off between sailing performance and potential maintenance headaches. Here's hoping this information is useful to you.


Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:23 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012